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Dale

MEET DALE AND BRENNAN!

This week’s shelter pets are Dale and Brennan, two 6-month-old orange tabby cats currently waiting at the Smithtown Animal Shelter to be adopted.

Brennan

These handsome, bonded brothers came to the shelter about two months ago with severe upper respiratory infections. After some TLC, they are now healthy and ready for their happily ever after together. These gentle mushes love to cuddle together and get affection from people too. They were very shy when they arrived at the shelter, but have warmed up to everyone. They would do best in a quieter home. They come neutered, microchipped and are up to date on all their vaccines.

If you are interested in meeting these brothers, please call ahead to schedule an hour to properly interact with them in the shelter’s Meet and Greet Room. The Smithtown Animal & Adoption Shelter is located at 410 Middle Country Road, Smithtown. For more information, please call 631-360-7575 or visit www.smithtownanimalshelter.com.

Joseph Lloyd Manor

Preservation Long Island, a regional preservation advocacy nonprofit based in Cold Spring Harbor, is pleased to announce the United for Libraries Literary LandmarkTM designation for one of its historic properties, Joseph Lloyd Manor, an 18th -century manor house in Lloyd Harbor, NY, and a site of Black enslavement. The designation honors Jupiter Hammon (1711– ca.1806), one of the earliest published African American writers who composed his most well- known works while enslaved at the manor.

The Literary LandmarkTM plaque unveiling and virtual celebration will take place at 2 p.m. ET on Saturday, Oct. 17, which recognizes Hammon’s 309th birthday as well as Black Poetry Day. This will mark the first Literary Landmark dedication to be livestreamed.

Jupiter Hammon’s life and writings offer an exceptionally nuanced view of slavery and freedom on Long Island before and after the American Revolution. His works are especially significant because most literature and historical documents from the eighteenth century were not written from an enslaved person’s point of view.

Hammon’s known works include at least six poems and three essays published during his lifetime. At Joseph Lloyd Manor in 1786, he penned “An Address to the Negroes of the State of New-York” and “An Essay on Slavery.”

“As one of the significant early examples of African American literature before the republic, Jupiter Hammon’s work is a masterful ethical critique on slavery, religion, and humane relationship,” said Dr. Georgette Grier-Key, Executive Director and Chief Curator of Eastville Community Historical Society and a member of the Jupiter Hammon Project Advisory Council.

“The designation by United for Libraries validates what we recognized from the beginning, that Jupiter Hammon is a nationally significant individual in history but not many people know about him,” said Lauren Brincat, Curator at Preservation Long Island.

“The Literary Landmark designation complements the work of our multi-year Jupiter Hammon Project that aims to engage the site more fully to reflect the multiple events, perspectives, and people that shaped the house’s history, including elevating the voice and history of Jupiter Hammon”, said Alexandra Wolfe, Preservation Long Island’s Executive Director.

The unveiling event will feature remarks by Rocco Staino, United for Libraries Board Member and Director of Empire State Center for the Book and Irene Moore, Chair, Huntington African American Historic Designation Council. Actor/writer, Malik Work will perform his poem, “An Aria of Pain”. The winners of the Jupiter Hammon Essay/Poetry Contest from Silas Wood Sixth Grade Center, South Huntington Union Free School District, will recite their winning entries. Closing remarks will be delivered by Joye Brown, Columnist/Associate Editor, Newsday.

“One of the advantages of a virtual event and livestreaming of the designation ceremony is that it will be accessible to a much larger audience. We will also have recorded documentation of this celebration of Hammon’s significant accomplishments and contributions to American history and literature that will endure digitally on our website”, said Wolfe.

To register for the virtual event via Zoom visit:

https://www.eventbrite.com/e/jupiter-hammon-literary-landmark-virtual-celebration-tickets- 91899358455

To view the event via Facebook Live (no registration required), visit Preservation Long Island’s Facebook page on October 17th at 2 p.m.:
https://www.facebook.com/preservationlongisland/

Photo by Heidi Sutton

The Port Jefferson Station/Terryville Chamber of Commerce hosted a ribbon cutting for SoBol in Port Jefferson Station on Oct. 7. The event was attended by members of the chamber, state and local officials as well as corporate members from SoBol.

Photo by Heidi Sutton

Located at 1035 Route 112, Port Jefferson Station in the Crossroads Shopping Center, the East Coast based franchise specializes in acai bowls, pitaya bowls, green bowls and fruit smoothies. They also offer coffee and kids bowls.

“Thank you to all who have been a part of our opening! We are so excited to be a part of the Port Jefferson Station community,” said owner Numa Hernandez.

Pictured from left, SoBol co-founder Jim Kalomiris; Suffolk County Legislator Kara Hahn; owner Numa Hernandez; Councilwoman Valerie Cartright; President of Port Jefferson Station/Terryville Chamber of Commerce Jennifer Dznovar; SoBol Project Manager Bill Meindl; SoBol founder Jason Mazzarone; Town of Brookhaven Supervisor Edward P. Romaine; NYS Assemblyman Steve Englebright; and President of Port Jefferson Chamber of Commerce Barbara Ransome.

The cafe offers call in orders, online orders, and works with third-party delivery services like Doordash, Uber Eats, Postmates and GrubHub. Hours are 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. Monday through Saturday, 9 a.m. to 8 p.m. on Sundays. For more information, call 631-743-9643 or visit www.mysobol.com.

Residents in Commack and East Northport were treated to a rolling car show Oct. 11. The show was the eighth one that took place this year and the last for 2020. Smithtown resident Patty Mancuso organized the events and started the Facebook page Smithtown Rolling Car show. “I started this because there were no car shows this spring, something me and my husband Phil really look forward to,” she said. “As I watched one SUV birthday parade after another pass my house while working from home, I dreamed of something better to watch.” Mancuso said after choosing what neighborhood to drive through, she would map out the route and contact residents through the Nextdoor app. During the last few months, the rolling car show has been spotted in Smithtown, Hauppauge, Dix Hills, Commack, East Northport and Kings Park.  Photos by Jennifer Castillo

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Emma S. Clark Memorial Library, 120 Main St., Setauket hosts a Community Shred Day in its parking lot on Saturday, Oct. 17 from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Protect your privacy and get rid of clutter. A shredding truck from A Shred Away, Inc., will be in the library’s parking lot for on-site shredding of personal documents.  Please NO plastic, carbon paper, hanging files, red well folders, cardboard, newspapers or magazines will be accepted. Clips and staples are fine to put through the shredder. NO wet papers, and please take any boxes, bags, etc., back home with you. All paper collected will be recycled at a certified paper mill. Please wear a mask. No registration required. For more information, call 631-941-4080.

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Time to shop for treasures

Good news! The Red Barn Boutique at Mt. Sinai Congregational Church, 233 North Country Road, Mt. Sinai, will reopen for the season on Oct. 17 and every Saturday thereafter through Dec. 19 from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. New items are being donated every week and all proceeds from the sale go to support the church and its missions. For further details, please call 631-473-1582.

By Heidi Sutton

In perfect harmony with autumn and Halloween, a special little pumpkin patch has sprouted in Smithtown; one that sings and dances and teaches us that the things that make you different make you special.

In partnership with the Smithtown Historical Society, the Smithtown Center for the Performing Arts presents a socially distant outdoor production of Spookley the Square Pumpkin: The Musical on the society’s grounds through October.

Based on the animated film Spookley the Square Pumpkin by Joe Troiano and Tom Hughes and the book The Legend of Spookley the Square Pumpkin by Troiano, it tells the story of a square pumpkin living in a round pumpkin patch and his struggle to fit in.

Kieran Brown stars as Spookley

It’s Halloween and all of the pumpkins at Holiday Hill Farm are hoping that Farmer Hill will choose them as the Pick of the Patch this year, the highest honor a pumpkin can receive. Jack Scarecrow introduces the audience to the top contenders —  Big Tom and Little Tom who are attached by a vine and Bobo the perfectly round and pretty pumpkin. When a square pumpkin named Spookley appears from under a leaf he is immediately bullied by Little Tom who convinces the other pumpkins to shun him because he looks different.

Spookley makes friends with Jack and three spiders, Edgar, Allen and Poe, who encourage him to try out for the Pick of the Patch contest but he has lost his confidence because of the constant teasing. When a mighty storm appears and all the round pumpkins start rolling away toward the river, Spookley realizes it is up to him and his square shape to save the day. Will they stop teasing him now? Will he win the contest?

Directed by Jordan Hue, with musical direction by Melissa Coyle, choreography by Courtney Braun and costumes by Ronnie Green, the professional young cast of 13 give a flawless performance and succeed in bringing this sweet treat and its important message to life during National Bullying Prevention Month.

Special mention must be made of Kieran Brown who is perfectly cast as the soft-spoken and kind Spookley and Max Lamberg as Little Tom who steals the show with his incredible personality. This adorable show has it all — a terrific cast, wonderful songs and an important lesson. Your kids will love it!

The cast: Gabrielle Arroyo, Ava Bernardo, Gabby Blum, Kieran Brown, Max Lamberg, Emmerson Lebrecht, Stephanie Nigro, Dylan O’Leary, Logan O’Leary, Adrienne Porti, Savannah Shaw, Ari Spiegel, and Justin Walsh Wiener

The Smithtown Center for the Performing Arts presents Spookley the Square Pumpkin: The Musical in the open air outdoor performance space behind the Smithtown Historical Society’s Roseneath Cottage, 239 Middle Country Rd., Smithtown on Saturdays and Sundays through Oct. 31. Running time is one hour with no intermission. Masks are required and costumes are encouraged. Tickets are $18 per person. For a complete schedule and to order tickets, visit www.smithtownpac.org.

Photos by Courtney Braun

Photo by Rachel Shapiro

Long Island’s largest freshwater lake needs a little help. Join volunteers from the Lake Ronkonkoma Improvement Group for a cleanup at Lake Ronkonkoma on Saturday, Oct. 17 from 10 a.m. to noon. Help clean the beach front, paint a wall to prep for a mural, and clear debris from a wooded area. Students will receive community service hours. All cleaning supplies will be provided except gloves. Children under 11 must be accompanied by an adult. Meet at Michael P. Murphy Beach, Lake Shore Road, Ronkonkoma. This community event is sponsored by Sachem Public Library. Questions? Call Evelyn at 631-588-7599.

Port Jefferson hosted its 24th annual Charles Dickens Festival In 2019. It won't be back until 2021. File photo by Kyle Barr

The 25th annual Charles Dickens Festival may be quarantined until next year, but Santa himself may be coming down from the North Pole for some socially distanced festivities come December.

Village and chamber officials both confirmed the annual Dickens fest is moving to next year, skipping this year to host their quarter-century event. Though Charles Dickens won’t appear on any of the taglines or advertising, there will still be holiday-based events. 

The village is hosting what’s been dubbed A Touch of Holiday Cheer on the three Saturdays before Christmas. 

“What we really would like to see happen is on the Saturday’s through December, we can find some small ways for having people come down and celebrate the holiday season,” Mayor Margot Garant said. 

Although Garant said that not hosting the festival’s 25th anniversary is “gut-wrenching,” they do not want to create an atmosphere that could become unsafe, since the festival normally brings in thousands of people Down Port. 

“We want to give reasons for people to come down here, celebrate the day, do some local shopping, support our local markets,” she said. “That’s the underlying reason we do Dickens, after all, to be together and hopefully we have something to celebrate come December.” 

A full list of happenings are still being determined, but the chamber has set several events already for the three December Saturdays before Christmas. Barbara Ransome, the executive director of the Greater Port Jefferson Chamber of Commerce, said they still plan to do Cookie Land for kids to decorate cookies by appointment at the Village Center. The chamber will host a photo opportunity with Santa on his big red sleigh from 1 to 4 p.m. Children will be staged in front of the sleigh instead of their usual position on his lap so there will be no direct contact. People are also asked for a $5 donation to the chamber.

Garant added the Festival of Tress – with social distancing – is planned on the third floor of the village center, some outdoor concert and plays, as well as a performance from Setauket resident and singer Carolyn Benson. A belle choir is also scheduled for Dec. 5.

“It’s going to be an interesting season,” Garant said. “But I think the one thing that brings everyone together is the holidays, and I think we can all agree on that.” 

More information on chamber events can be found at portjeffchamber.com

Additional reporting by Kyle Barr

By Melissa Arnold

For decades, Carmela Kolman labored over canvas and paper to capture the world through her eyes. Painting was her greatest passion, and coupled with great talent, it carried her work to galleries across the United States.

But it wasn’t always easy. Kolman also had Marfan syndrome, a rare connective tissue disorder that can affect the entire body. In daily life, she struggled with her eyesight, and ultimately died from complications of the condition in 2018. She was 57.

In recognition of Kolman’s extensive career and her contributions to the local art community on Long Island, Gallery North in Setauket is hosting a retrospective exhibition titled Visions. The solo exhibit features 17 pieces that reflect much of Kolman’s career, from her early days as a student to the final years of her life.

Painting was Kolman’s first love from an early age, even though she was blind in one eye and her vision was severely impaired in the other. In an artist statement from Aug. 2016, she wrote: “I painted constantly, with my face pressed close to the canvas. I would have to really look and study things to make them out … I could not recognize something more than three feet from me ­­— Blue eyes? I didn’t even know what blue eyes were … My vision was blurry, and I painted what I saw.”

Despite her difficulties, Kolman pressed on. She received a bachelor’s degree in illustration from the Rhode Island School of Design (RISD), then attended Yale for a master’s degree in painting. Her cloudy painting style earned her high praise, even as she dealt with constant self-criticism and frustration.

It was during her time at RISD that Kolman met John Rizzo, who attended nearby Brown University. The pair wouldn’t get acquainted until much later at a party hosted by a mutual friend in Chicago, but Rizzo called the experience a work of fate. They married in 1989.

“I’m a professor and economist with zero artistic talent,” joked Rizzo, who shared 28 years of marriage with Kolman. “We were an unlikely couple, for sure. I think our friends were surprised at how we took an interest in one another. But she was an incredibly tender-hearted person, very open and empathetic.”

At 22, Kolman had cataract surgery, catapulting her vision from a cloudy haze to an overwhelming perfection she didn’t know how to process. She stopped painting for several years, only starting again while recovering from a cardiac incident. From then on, she sought to integrate the impressionistic blur of her early work with the realism that came along after her eye surgery.

Gallery North’s Executive Director Ned Puchner didn’t have the chance to meet Kolman, but worked closely with Rizzo to choose work that reflected every season of her life and artistic style.

“These paintings capture something about reality that goes deeper than what we see,” Puchner said. “[Carmela] was influenced by the impressionists and the Fauvists, and would focus on singular objects over and over again in an almost meditative way. I’m really impressed by the attention to detail. Her work is breathtaking.”

Rizzo noted that Kolman preferred still life portraits, especially of fruit and flowers. Today, one of the rooms in his Port Jefferson home has rose-themed decor, with her rose paintings hung all around.

“She liked to play with different kinds of light, shading and shadow, and still life allowed her to control those elements carefully,” he explained. “It’s hard to choose a favorite painting, but I love all of the rose portraits. How many people can say their wife left beautiful oil paintings to remember her by? They help me to feel close to her.”

After her death, Gallery North approached Rizzo with an idea: Why not establish a fellowship in Carmela’s name, allowing other artists the time to create while sharing their expertise with others?

The Carmela Kolman Fellowship in Fine Art program will award one artist per year 10 weeks of studio time at the gallery. In addition to pursuing their artistic practice, the fellows will also teach workshops, help to organize community programming, or assist with classes as needed. The first fellow, Meagan Flaherty, will exhibit her work in 2021.

Carmela Kolman: Visions will be on view at Gallery North, 90 North Country Road, Setauket from Oct. 8 to Nov. 8. Admission is free. The gallery is currently open Wednesday through Friday from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. and Sunday from 3 to 5 p.m. A virtual reception will be held via Zoom on Oct. 22 from 6 to 8 p.m. For more information, call 631-751-2676 or visit www.gallerynorth.org.

Images courtesy of Gallery North