Authors Posts by Heidi Sutton

Heidi Sutton

Heidi Sutton
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Glen and Tara Grippe
Patrice and Jimmy Perreca, Sound Beach
Patrice and Jimmy Perreca

It was Thanksgiving weekend 1995. I was recently divorced and a teacher colleague and I decided that we should go out that Friday night. We decided on the Unitarian Church in Stony Brook, where they held gatherings for singles. Chairs forming circles of ten were throughout the room. A moderator posed questions we each had a minute to answer. We moved to different circles and at the end of the night, I found myself sitting next to a guy who had been in the first group! His name was Jim and he told me later at the diner where we went for coffee that he had planned that! We were married in 1997 and still celebrate Nov. 24th as a special anniversary!

Sue and Dave Rosner, East Setauket
Dave and Sue Rosner

What a love story!  When romance starts again at age 57, the second time around can be the best!

Sue and Dave met on Match.com 10 years ago. He said it was her smile that attracted him to her profile picture, and she said it was his blue eyes. As it turned out, they both had easy going personalities, enjoyed outside activities, music and adventure. Similarly, together they had 3 daughters who became instant friends once they met. Their first date was at “Sweet Mamma’s” in Northport for brunch. Dave brought along their Zodiac Signs, which matched them as well!  Now married for 8 years, they truly are each other’s soul mate!

Robin and Cliff Lemkin, East Setauket
Cliff and Robin Lemkin

It was a lovely fall day in 1983. I was strolling around the Smith Haven Mall when I realized it was time for an eye exam. Off I went to Sterling Optical.

As I was settling into the exam chair, this very handsome, adorable and very single Optometrist entered the room. The examination began. Dr. Lemkin looked into my beautiful green eyes. He proceeded to tell me that I had the most Captivating Corneas, the most Ravishing Retinas and the most Iridescent Irises that he had ever seen!

Shortly after we went on our first date. We were married on May 25th, l986 at the North Shore Jewish Center. Cliff and I were the first guests to stay in the honeymoon suite at the newly opened Danfords Hotel.

Kate and Larry Passaretti, Setauket
Kate and Larry Passaretti

Larry and I met in an evening business course at Nassau Community College in 1978.  We’re  blessed with two children … a wonderful son-in-law and grandson and a sweet future daughter-in-law!

Life is good and we feel fortunate to maintain good health so we can enjoy all that is to be. As my dear Dad used to always say to be happy in life you need three things:

“… someone to love … something to do … and something to look forward to …”

… we look forward to our son’s wedding this summer!!

Glen & Tara Grippe, Setauket

We met in 11th grade in the hallways of Ward Melville High School. We were high school sweethearts and even attended the 1990 Ward Melville Senior Prom together. We recently celebrated 25 years of marriage in November of 2020 and have two children, Connor and Emily who are both college students.

 

 

 

And a post from TBR News Media’s Instagram …

Our Moms were pregnant at the same time. He was born three weeks after me and we played together in my sandbox as toddlers. So, pretty much known each other forever. Reconnected on FB after 25 years without speaking.

— Kristen Memoli, Huntington

Thank you to all who participated in TBR News Media’s How I Met My Mate contest! Congratulations to Patrice and Jimmy Perreca of Sound Beach! They win dinner for two at Bliss Restaurant in East Setauket with a choice of dining in or takeout. Happy Valentine’s Day!

 

Photo from Councilman LaValle's office

The Ronkonkoma Chamber of Commerce celebrated the opening of Super Greek Gyro Bowls & More with a grand opening and ribbon cutting ceremony on Jan. 12. 

Located at 966 Portion Road in the former Peter’s Kitchen, the restaurant specializes in gyro bowls and other Greek classics while providing their own twist to Greek street food with Greek Nachos and Poutine, homemade Spinach and Cheese Pies, and Greek sodas.

The event was attended by New York State Senators Alexis Weik and Mario Mattera, Brookhaven Town Councilman Kevin LaValle, Suffolk County Legislator Nick Caracappa’s Chief of Staff Robert Martinez, Ronkonkoma Chamber of Commerce President Kevin Hyms and Farmingville Hills Chamber President Michael Wentz, friends and family who wished owners Ralphy and Kostas Mokkas and Mikey Hernandez well on their new venture.

Operating hours are 11 a.m. Mondays through Saturdays, closed on Sundays. For more information, call 631-648-9080 or visit www.supergreekny.com.

From left, Branch Manger Hope Kinney; Retail District Manager Michael Billia; President & Chief Operating Officer Domenick Cama; Retail Market Executive Ana Oliveira; Manuel London, Dean, Stony Brook University’s College of Business; and John Tsunis. Photos by Leah Dunaief

Investors Bank of Setauket presented a check in the amount of $25,000 to the Stony Brook School of Business on Jan. 19. The donation will be used to fund the College of Business’s Pandemic Shift program to support small businesses in Suffolk County as they pivot, re-start, and expand.

Domenick Cama

“So many of our small businesses have been hurt by this pandemic.  Supporting Stony Brook brings help and hope to these businesses.  We believe their progress is our responsibility as a member of the Long Island community,” said Domenick Cama, President and COO of Investors Bank.

A division of Suffolk Forward, spearheaded by County Executive Steve Bellone, the program provides workshops for business owners, virtual internships for students to work with businesses, pro-bono faculty consulting, technology support from Stony Brook’s Office of Economic Development, and faculty research on the effects of the pandemic on businesses and consumers. 

Each session consists of four interactive 90-minute sessions via Zoom. For more information, please visit www.shiftgroup.com/pandemic-shift.

 

 

Stay indoors during a winter storm warning. METRO photo
Leg. Nick Caracappa

The winter season is upon us, and with a 70 percent chance of 1 to 3 inches of snow on Monday night, Jan. 25 into Tuesday, Suffolk County Legislator Nick Caracappa would like to offer residents helpful tips and websites in preparation for extreme cold weather and winter storms.

“It is important to take simple precautionary measures to keep your family safe and protect your home, pets and personal property during the brutal winter months,” said Legislator Caracappa.

The following information is provided courtesy of https://www.ready.gov/

Winter storms create a higher risk of car accidents, hypothermia, frostbite, carbon monoxide poisoning, and heart attacks from overexertion. Winter storms including blizzards can bring extreme cold, freezing rain, snow, ice and high winds.

A winter storm can:

  • Last a few hours or several days.
  • Cut off heat, power and communication services.
  • Put older adults, children and sick individuals at greater risk.

IF YOU ARE UNDER A WINTER STORM WARNING, FIND SHELTER RIGHT AWAY

  • Stay off roads.
  • Stay indoors and dress warmly.
    • If you need to spend time in a public indoor space in order to stay safe from the cold, follow CDC precautions to protect yourself and others from COVID-19: wear a mask and maintain a distance of at least six feet between yourself and those who are not a part of your household. Masks should not be worn by children under two years of age, those who have trouble breathing, and those who are unable to remove them on their own.
  • Prepare for power outages.
  • Use generators outside only and away from windows.
  • Listen for emergency information and alerts.
  • Look for signs of hypothermia and frostbite.
  • Check on neighbors while following the latest guidelinesfrom the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) on maintaining social and physical distancing. https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-nCoV/index.html. Consider connecting with family and friends by telephone, e-mail, text messages, video chat, and social media. If you must visit in person, wear a mask and maintain a distance of at least six feet from them.

 

HOW TO STAY SAFE WHEN A WINTER STORM THREATENS:

Prepare NOW

  • Know your area’s risk for winter storms. Extreme winter weather can leave communities without utilities or other services for long periods of time.
  • Prepare your home to keep out the cold with insulation, caulking and weather stripping. Learn how to keep pipes from freezing. Install and test smoke alarms and carbon monoxide detectors with battery backups.
  • Know your winter weather terms. https://www.weather.gov/bgm/WinterTerms
  • Pay attention to weather reports and warnings of freezing weather and winter storms.
  • Sign up for your community’s warning system. The Emergency Alert System (EAS) and National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Weather Radioalso provide emergency alerts. Sign up for email updates about coronavirus from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) here: https://www.cdc.gov/Other/emailupdates/.
  • Gather supplies in case you need to stay home for several days without power. Keep in mind each person’s specific needs, including medication. Remember the needs of your pets. Have extra batteries for radios and flashlights.  If you are able to, set aside items like soap, hand sanitizer that contains at least 60 percent alcohol, disinfecting wipes, and general household cleaning supplies that you can use to disinfect surfaces you touch regularly.
  • Create an emergency supply kit for your car. Include jumper cables, sand, a flashlight, warm clothes, blankets, bottled water and non-perishable snacks. Keep a full tank of gas.
    • Remember that not everyone can afford to respond by stocking up on necessities. For those who can afford it, making essential purchases and slowly building up supplies in advance will allow for longer time periods between shopping trips. This helps to protect those who are unable to procure essentials in advance of the pandemic and must shop more frequently. Being prepared allows you to avoid unnecessary excursions and to address minor medical issues at home, alleviating the burden on urgent care centers and hospitals.

 

  • Learn the signs of, and basic treatments for, frostbite and hypothermia.
    • If you are sick and need medical attention, contact your healthcare provider for further care instructions and shelter in place, if possible. If you are experiencing a medical emergency, call 9-1-1 and let the operator know if you have, or think you might have, COVID-19. If possible, put on a mask before help arrives.

Learn the symptoms of COVID-19 https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/symptoms-testing/symptoms.html

Frostbite causes loss of feeling and color around the face, fingers and toes.

    • Signs: Numbness, white or grayish-yellow skin, firm or waxy skin.
    • Actions: Go to a warm room. Soak in warm water. Use body heat to warm. Do not massage or use a heating pad.
  • Hypothermia is an unusually low body temperature. A temperature below 95 degrees is an emergency.
    • Signs: Shivering, exhaustion, confusion, fumbling hands, memory loss, slurred speech or drowsiness.
    • Actions: Go to a warm room. Warm the center of the body first—chest, neck, head and groin. Keep dry and wrapped up in warm blankets, including the head and neck.

 

Survive DURING

  • Stay off roads if at all possible. If trapped in your car, then stay inside.
  • Limit your time outside. If you need to go outside, then wear layers of warm clothing. Watch for signs of frostbite and hypothermia.
    • Be sure to have several clean masks to use in case your mask becomes wet or damp from snow. Cloth masks should not be worn when they become damp or wet. Be sure to wash your mask regularly.
  • Avoid carbon monoxide poisoning. Only use generators and grills outdoors and away from windows. Never heat your home with a gas stovetop or oven.
  • Reduce the risk of a heart attack by avoiding overexertion when shoveling snow and walking in the snow.
    • Masks may make it difficult to breathe, especially for those who engage in high intensity activities, like shoveling. If you are unable to wear a mask, maintain a distance of at least six feet between yourself and those who are not part of your household.
  • Watch for signs of frostbite and hypothermia and begin treatment right away.
  • If it is safe to do so, check on neighbors while following the latest guidelines from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) on maintaining social and physical distancing. Consider connecting with family and friends by telephone, e-mail, text messages, video chat, and social media. If you must visit in person, wear a mask and maintain a distance of at least six feet from them. Masks should not be worn by children under two years of age, those who have trouble breathing, and those who are unable to remove them on their own.

Be Safe AFTER

  • Frostbite causes loss of feeling and color around the face, fingers, and toes.
    • Signs: Numbness, white or grayish-yellow skin, and firm or waxy skin.
    • Actions: Go to a warm room. Soak in warm water. Use body heat to warm. Do not massage or use a heating pad.
  • Hypothermia is an unusually low body temperature. A temperature below 95 degrees is an emergency.
    • Signs: Shivering, exhaustion, confusion, fumbling hands, memory loss, slurred speech, and drowsiness.
    • Actions: Go to a warm room. Warm the center of the body first—chest, neck, head, and groin. Keep dry and wrapped up in warm blankets, including the head and neck.
  • If you are sick and need medical attention, contact your healthcare provider for further care instructions and shelter in place, if possible. If you are experiencing a medical emergency, call 9-1-1 and let the operator know if you have, or think you might have, COVID-19. If possible, put on a mask before help arrives.
  • Engage virtually with your community through video and phone calls. Know that it’s normal to feel anxious or stressed. Take care of your body and talk to someone if you are feeling upset. Many people may already feel fear and anxiety about the coronavirus 2019 (COVID-19). The threat of a winter storm can add additional stress. Follow CDC guidance for managing stress during a traumatic event and managing stress during COVID-19.
  • It is important to help our first responders by removing snow around fire hydrants.

For more safety and health-related guidelines, visit https://www.cdc.gov/.

Sofia Heimbold

LUCKY DUCK!

Congratulations to Sofia Heimbold of East Setauket for being the winner of Studio 268’s raffle! “View From the Second Stone Bridge” by artist Mary Jane Van Zeijts with custom walnut framing by Jonathan Busko was raffled off during the art studio’s student exhibit, Nature, in December. The pastel painting depicts Conscience Bay in November at high tide. 

A preview of the exhibit was published in the Dec. 3 issue of TBR News Media’s Arts & Lifestyles section.

The total raffle sales of $1,340 was donated to the Frank Melville Memorial Foundation as a thank you for allowing Studio 268 to hold outdoor social distanced art classes at the picturesque Frank Melville Memorial Park in Setauket this past summer.

Time to show off your smarts! Join the Whaling Museum of Cold Spring Harbor for a virtual Trivia Night for adults on Thursday, Jan. 7 at 7 p.m. This month’s theme is FOOD. Don’t worry, you’re not breaking any resolutions, just come with your best foodie facts! Win bragging rights and museum passes. ​Free to play. $5 suggested donation appreciated. 
Register Here

Keep an eye on their social media posts in the upcoming week for a trivia hint or two! Follow them on FacebookTwitter, and Instagram For more information, call 631-367-3418 or visit www.cshwhalingmuseum.org.

Bob's Stores in Selden. Photo by Heidi Sutton

Bob’s Store in Selden may be closing its doors but it’s not ready to call it quits. An employee at the 17 Middle Country Road location confirmed that the business is moving next door into the former A.C. Moore Arts and Crafts location at 15 Middle Country Road by the end of February.

The large department store, which sells clothing and shoes, is located in the College Plaza Shopping Center which also houses ShopRite, Panera Bread, Duck Donuts and the Selden Post Office.

It is rumored that the national crafts and home decor chain Hobby Lobby has expressed interest in the space.

Photo from Councilman LaValle's office

Brookhaven Town Councilman Kevin LaValle (center) attended a ribbon cutting for Popeyes Louisiana Kitchen in Centereach on Nov. 23. Located at 1770 Middle Country Road in front of Island Thrift, the fast-food chain is known for its signature chicken, fried shrimp, biscuits and most recently, its fried chicken sandwiches.

“I was happy to attend the ribbon cutting ceremony for Popeyes Louisiana Kitchen … I want to thank them for giving me the grand tour of their new building and letting me try some of their delicious food, and I wish them the best of luck with their new business!” said Councilman LaValle.

In addition to the Centereach location, there are currently nine other Popeyes locations in Suffolk County including Patchogue, Shirley, Lindenhurst, Bay Shore, Huntington, Riverhead, Brentwood, Deer Park and Coram.

Hours for the Centereach restaurant are 10:30 a.m. to 11:30 p.m. Wednesdays through Mondays and 10 a.m. to 11:30 p.m. on Tuesdays. For more information, call 631-648-8736

Photo from HAC
Calling all artists! The Huntington Arts Council’s Main Street Gallery, 213 Main St., Huntington seeks submissions for its upcoming exhibit, Paradoxical Paradigms, to be held from Feb. 3 to March 13, 2021.  Deadline to enter is Jan. 4, 2021.
A paradox is defined as something that contradicts itself but is nevertheless true, something that should not exist but defies expectations. Huntington Arts Council is calling for artists to challenge themselves and push the boundaries with what is possible with their art. Pieces that seem impossible yet exist anyway, exploring themes of the impossible and the contradictory.
About the Juror: Kristin Cuomo is the Senior Museum Educator at the Long Island Museum in Stony Brook, NY. She develops and facilitates interpretive history and arts programming, with a focus on accessibility for all audiences. She curates the museum’s community exhibits, including annual student art shows and exhibits celebrating the work of artists from community partnerships. Prior to the museum, Kristin developed and taught arts programming for out of school time and community programs across Long Island; she also works as an arts manager. She holds a BA in The Arts and Community Programming and is an MA candidate in the Museum Studies program at City University of New York.
ENTRIES
* Entries must be original to entrant. Framed entries require hanging wire. Submission materials cannot be returned.
* Selected works are chosen by the juror. No more than two works per artist are selected.
ELIGIBILITY
* All artists and media.
SIZE
* No work should exceed 48 inches in any direction.
* Standing work cannot be higher than 72 inches.
* Video maximum: 50 MB.
ENTRY FEE
* First three entries:
JOURNEY* school students $15
Full-time students $25
Artist members $30
Non-members $40
Additional entries $5 each
Please note: Entry fees are nonrefundable.
HOW TO ENTER
  1. To submit application and payment  click here.
  2. To download paper application click here. Mail or drop off with
    Note: Images must be 300 dpi, 2400 pixels on the longest side. QUESTIONS email [email protected]