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Huntington Arts Council

'Tater Hill' by Adam Kane Macchia

“To the body and mind which have been cramped by noxious work or company, nature is medicinal and restores their tone. The tradesman, the attor­ney comes out of the din and craft of the street and sees the sky and the woods, and is a man again. In their eternal calm, he finds himself.” – Ralph Waldo Emerson

Huntington Arts Council, 213 Main St., Huntington invites artists to partic­ipate in “A Time For Reflection.”  Entries should focus on landscape works revolving around the theme of reflection and identity.

DEADLINE: October 11, 2021

EXHIBITION DATES: November 19 – December 18, 2021

ENTRIES

• Entries must be original to entrant. Framed entries require hanging wire. Submission materials cannot be returned.

• Selected works are chosen by the juror. No more than two works per artist are selected.

ELIGIBILITY

• All artists and media 

SIZE

• No work should exceed 48 inches in any direction.

• Standing work cannot be higher than 72 inches. 

ENTRY FEE

• First three entries

  • JOURNEY* school students $15
  • Full-time students $25
  • Artist Circle members $30
  • Non-members $40
  • Additional entries $5 each

Please note: Fees are nonrefundable. 

For all of guidelines for this call to artists click here.

Digital Submissions only – to submit application digitally click here.

To download the prospectus click here. 

About the Juror: Barbara Applegate loves art and, like Ralph Waldo Emerson, knows that many artists respond to a special call to create works about the landscape. Ms. Applegate has taught Art History to college students over the last eighteen years and served LIU’s Steinberg Museum of Art, as Coordinator and later Director, for more than twenty years. She seeks opportunities to engage viewers with works of art across all media. 

Questions? Please email [email protected]

'Phoenix' by Jae JQ Breslow

The Huntington Arts Council (HAC) in partnership with Sea of Visibility is currently presenting SEA of Visibility: The Voyage Exhibition: Curated by Anu Annam at their Main Street Gallery in Huntington and on their website at huntingtonarts.org.  The show runs through Sept. 4.

Artists were invited to “add your vision, your voice, and your voyage, making the invisible, visible, so the story of our collective struggle can be found, and the very specific connection for healing and integration can be made.”

Participating artists include Anu Annam, Tiffany Asadourian, Leila Atkinson, Robyn Bellospirito, Angelo Blanda, Jae ‘JQ’ Breslow, John Cino, Patty Eljaiek, Sueey Gutierrez, Regina Halliday, Andrew Hornberger, Roya Jenner, Maya Kawachi, Christophe Lima, Gina Mars, Margaret Minardi, Loretta Oberheim, Mark Propper, Dr. Nichelle Rivers, Devlin Starr, Robert Stenzel and Chloe Wheeler.

“The artwork for SEA of Visibility: The Voyage was selected based on visual craftsmanship, language, and resonance, and the stories that drove their creation. The work represents the deeply personal and varied experiences of the artists included. Topics range from a life-altering accident, perseverance through various disabilities, strained family relationships, acknowledgment of vulnerabilities and shadow sides, dreams, death, living with grief, facing absurdity, coping with a harrowing pandemic to the inexplicable, even irrational, hope that is the wind in the sails of our own “hero’s journey”. The final artwork selections embrace the sunlit space of the Huntington Arts Council’s Main Street Gallery—chosen based on how they interact with one another and the venue. They create a community voice through this larger work of art that is the exhibition, together, on a singular voyage to be heard and understood” said Curator Anu Annam.

“The Huntington Arts Council is very happy to have the opportunity to partner with Anu Annam and Sea of Visibility. The pieces in The Voyage reflect a beautiful diversity of work and variety of mediums. The exhibition tells individual stories filled with emotion and powerful intent. I encourage everyone to come to our Main Street Gallery and experience this show in person” said HAC Executive Director, Marc Courtade.

The Huntington Arts Council’s Main Street Gallery, 213 Main St., Huntington is open Tuesday to Friday from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. For weekend hours, call 631-271-8423.

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SEA of Visibility is an organization based in Long Island, NY that embraces our multicultural, queer, and disabled artists and our allies, focusing on neurodiversity and mental health. It “Supports Expression through the Arts” (SEA) and promotes destigmatization and integration through multidisciplinary art exhibitions, performances, and art-making programs-broadening the public’s vision on what mental illness is.

The Huntington Folk Festival took place Saturday, July 17, at Heckscher Park. The 15th annual event featured the Long Island-based Americana band Quarter Horse as the headliner.

The free event was co-presented by the Folk Music Society of Huntington and the Huntington Arts Council as part of the 56th Huntington Summer Arts Festival.

Michael Kornfeld, president of the Folk Music Society of Huntington and editor and publisher of AcousticMusicScene.com, conducted an on-stage conversational interview with the featured and opening artists prior to the show.

Pictured clockwise from above, Harmony Workshop with The Honey Dewdrops; Catherine Miles and Jay Mafale; a couple enjoys the show; Rachael Sage; and The Royal Yard, a sea shanty duo with Robin Greenstein and Stuart Markus. On the cover, South Country String Band.

When channeling their creativity, artists sometimes venture beyond the canvas and turn their attention to art that can adorn the human body. Such is the case with the Huntington Arts Council’s latest juried exhibit, Wearable Art 2.0. The show opened at the HAC’s Main Street Gallery on July 2. 

Back by popular demand, the exhibit features artwork that meets at the intersection of fashion and fine art through design, costume, or culture. Submissions are representative of the creative inspiration found in garments, accessories (art jewelry, masks, bags, etc.), and representational work (design boards, performance images, etc.). 

The show was juried by Dominique Maciejka, owner of Paper Doll Vintage Boutique in Sayville and Paper Doll Curiosity Shoppe in Patchogue.

“The work submitted showcased a beautiful range of what wearable art can mean to artists and how it can be interpreted. The works chosen exemplified a strong vision conceptually, technically or a combination of both. Some pieces were more traditional, while others had a modern and contemporary spin for a wonderful variety of works,” said Maciejka.

Participating artists include Lisa Cangemi, Oksana Danziger, Ciamara Donawa, Diane Godlewski, Steven Goldleaf, Nathaly Gomez, Jan Guarino, Veronica Haley, Drew Kane, Julianna Kirk, Allison Mack, Lorraine Manzo Angeletti, Meagan J. Meehan, John Micheals, Gail Neuman, Luda Pahl, Eileen Palmer, Athena Protonentis, Amanda Reilly, Cindy Russell, Jasmine Scarlatos, Meryl Shapiro, Danangelowe Spencer, Steven Tze, Ana Urbach and JoAnn Zambito.

Wearable Art 2.0 is a direct extension of the first version of this theme that took place in our Main Street Gallery three years ago. The creativity, technique, and artistry represented in this revival of Wearable Art has exceeded our expectations,” said Marc Courtade, Executive Director of the Huntington Arts Council.

The following participating artists received special acknowledgement from Maciejka at a private reception on July 9.

Best in Show: 
Covid Warrior by Ana Urbach
Honorable Mentions:
Bejeweled & Bedazzled Collection by Meghan J. Meehan
Unfinished by Luda Pahl
Hypnotic Bee Scarf  by Amanda Reilly
It’s a Trend DON’T SHOOT by Danangelowe Spencer
Fawl by Steven Tze

“The interpretation of the call is a true testament to how art can be designed and expressed in so many impactful and beautiful ways. Whether it be jewelry, quilted jackets, existing items that have been customized or hand painted silk, the exhibit is a show stopper. All are invited to stop by our gallery and experience the work in person,” said Courtade. 

The Huntington Arts Council’s Main Street Gallery, 213 Main St., Huntington will present Wearable Art 2.0 through July 31. The exhibit is also on view online. Hours for the gallery are Tuesday to Friday from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. For weekend hours, visit www.huntingtonarts.org or call 631-271-8423.

**This article was updated on July 13 to announce Best in Show and Honorable Mentions.

The Huntington Arts Council recently announced the winners of its High Arts Showcase XVII art exhibit.

High Arts Showcase XVII is a component of the JOURNEY Arts in Education Program providing partner school 11th and 12th grade students with the opportunity to present their talents in a gallery setting through this exclusive visual art exhibition. Participating school districts include Cold Spring Harbor Jr/Sr High School, Commack High School, Harborfields High School, Huntington High School, King’s Park High School, Northport High School, Plainview-Old Bethpage John F. Kennedy High School, and Walt Whitman High School. For more information on the artists and their work click here.

Congratulations to the following students awarded Best in Show and Honorable Mentions for their work:
  • Best in Show
    “Isiah” by Anthony Colley, Harborfields High School
  • Honorable Mentions
    “Conceptual Portrait 1” by Samantha Drouin, Commack High School
    “Grandpa John” by Olivia DeFeo, Northport High School
    “Primary Tribal” by Kendal Eggert, Kings Park
    “The Son of Man” (video) by Lauren Gooding, Huntington High School

The exhibit is on view at the Huntington Arts Council’s website, www.huntingtonarts.org, through April 10.

Photo from HAC
Calling all artists! The Huntington Arts Council’s Main Street Gallery, 213 Main St., Huntington seeks submissions for its upcoming exhibit, Paradoxical Paradigms, to be held from Feb. 3 to March 13, 2021.  Deadline to enter is Jan. 4, 2021.
A paradox is defined as something that contradicts itself but is nevertheless true, something that should not exist but defies expectations. Huntington Arts Council is calling for artists to challenge themselves and push the boundaries with what is possible with their art. Pieces that seem impossible yet exist anyway, exploring themes of the impossible and the contradictory.
About the Juror: Kristin Cuomo is the Senior Museum Educator at the Long Island Museum in Stony Brook, NY. She develops and facilitates interpretive history and arts programming, with a focus on accessibility for all audiences. She curates the museum’s community exhibits, including annual student art shows and exhibits celebrating the work of artists from community partnerships. Prior to the museum, Kristin developed and taught arts programming for out of school time and community programs across Long Island; she also works as an arts manager. She holds a BA in The Arts and Community Programming and is an MA candidate in the Museum Studies program at City University of New York.
ENTRIES
* Entries must be original to entrant. Framed entries require hanging wire. Submission materials cannot be returned.
* Selected works are chosen by the juror. No more than two works per artist are selected.
ELIGIBILITY
* All artists and media.
SIZE
* No work should exceed 48 inches in any direction.
* Standing work cannot be higher than 72 inches.
* Video maximum: 50 MB.
ENTRY FEE
* First three entries:
JOURNEY* school students $15
Full-time students $25
Artist members $30
Non-members $40
Additional entries $5 each
Please note: Entry fees are nonrefundable.
HOW TO ENTER
  1. To submit application and payment  click here.
  2. To download paper application click here. Mail or drop off with
    Note: Images must be 300 dpi, 2400 pixels on the longest side. QUESTIONS email [email protected]

The Huntington Arts Council (HAC) will present the juried exhibit Mirror Mirror virtually and at its Main Street Gallery from Nov. 13 to Dec. 19.

Artists were asked, “What kind of mirror does your artwork hold up to the world? During times of reflection is it a full length, vanity, compact, or a funhouse mirror containing many multitudes? Maybe it is more of a looking glass. Allow yourself to observe and then say, “I contain enough.” and let it out.”

Congratulations to all of the artists accepted into this show: Diane Brown Ardell, Sheri Berman, Sílvia Soares Boyer, Christie Devereaux De Cesare, Ellen DiFazio, Eliseea Faur, Jim Finlayson, Jan Guarino, Sueey J. Gutierrez, Heather Heckel, Imperfectly Perfect By Wendy, Margaret Henning, Julianna Kirk, Sarah Lambert, Kirk Larsen, Allison Mack, Kristen Memoli, Kasmira Mohanty, Gail Neuman, Luda Pahl, Sophia Pirone, Andrea Rhude, Thomas “TJ” Roszko, Khurshid Saleem, Lori Scarlatos, Meryl Shapiro, Neill Slaughter, Christina Stow, Tracy Tekverk, Amy Goodfellow Wagner, Stephen Wyler and Allison Zhang.

“I was so captivated and impressed by the broad spectrum of interpretations and varied mediums for the theme of Mirror, Mirror. The entries were so strong, but a concise vision for the exhibit began to form after reviewing every entry and guided my final selections. While jurying this exhibit I could not help but contemplate the way we “see” ourselves in so many places besides physical mirrors and photos,” said juror Caitlyn Shea.

“This exhibit truly highlights how we “see” ourselves when we interact with a person or animal, and how we intellectually “see” ourselves when we look contemplatively at the world around us – desiring a sense of purpose and belonging. The artists even “see” themselves mirrored in the act of creating. While Narcissus so egocentrically fell in love with his own reflection, the curious human act of searching for familiarity and mirrored traits in places like the cosmos, nature, and in other living creatures actually leads us to expand our horizons and grow our true sense of “self”. While artists are usually taught to look at their subjects objectively first, the artist cannot escape being reflected in their own work. This exhibit is an incredible exploration into introspective thought and self-reflection,” she said.

“The sentiment of this exhibition is in itself, reflective of our times. The challenges and changes that we have faced over the last several months have made us all look at things differently. The arts continue to provide a much needed “connection” to ourselves, communities, members and partners,” added  Executive Director of Huntington Arts Council, Marc Courtade. “Mirror Mirror is simultaneously thought provoking and uplifting. Please stop by our gallery or view on our website and “reflect” on this beautiful body of work.”

Mirror Mirror is on view at the Huntington Arts Council’s Main Street Gallery, 213 Main Street in Huntington, from Nov. 13 to Dec. 19 and on online at www.huntingtonarts.org. The gallery is open to the public Tuesday to Friday from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. and some Saturdays. Social distancing and masks are required. To schedule a visit, please call 631-271-8423.

Images courtesy of HAC

Nocuous Best Friend, digital illustration, by Fiorella Benitez of Huntington Station

It wouldn’t be Halloween in Huntington without the Huntington Arts Council’s (HAC) annual Nightmare on Main Street show. Now in its 9th year, the juried student art exhibit is on display in the HAC’s Main Street Gallery, 213 Main Street, Huntington and on its website (www.huntingtonarts.org) from Oct. 16 to Nov. 7.

What’s Underneath, photograph and photoshop by Ellie Smith of Greenlawn

Students in grades 6 to 12 were invited to submit art inspired by the theme of Halloween. For inspiration, juror Raquel Skellington asked, “Halloween is everybody’s favorite time of year to experience new things and get out of their comfort zones. It’s one of the greatest times for creative inspiration, the changing of the seasons, the spooky atmosphere, to bring to life some of our greatest creative endeavors. October 31 is the day where everybody can embody their favorite hero or their greatest fear. Paper and pen, paints and brushes, or costume and makeup, what method will you choose to bring your greatest creative idea to life?”

Congratulations to all of the students accepted into this show: Mia Bacchi, Fiorella Benitez, Sofia Bertolotti, Anna Bielawski, Jesse Boxenhorn, Ronald Cheng, Sofia Orellana Contreras, Paul Coppola, Giuliana Corliss, Olivia DeFeo, Sayra Fernandez, Taryn Gerlach, Calista Gipson, Shane Halleran, Meghan Hanley, Davan Howard, Corinne Lafont, Katelyn Lalehzar, Suah Lee, Liz Angela Lopez, Vincent Maio, Gianna Mancusi, Madeline Marcus, Emma Martensen, Vita Mazza, Thalia Merseburg, Delia Miles, Daniella Pedi, Marissa Reichelscheimer, Vivien Reyes, Tony Salinas, Ivette Sanchez, Natalie Schiff, Leo Schindler, Chloe Sealove, Serena Sellers, Sajjal Shah, Adriana Shields, Ellie Smith, Brooke Speicher, Aiyanna Torres, Cindy Wang, Isabella Weber, Jasmine Weston, and Elan Ben Yosef.

Caught Red Handed, digital photography and manipulation by Jesse Boxenhorn of Dix Hills

“It’s been such a joy to judge and go through these Spooktacular entries! Everyone clearly put their imagination to work and really produced some creative pieces,” said Skellington.

“It is remarkable that Nightmare on Main Street is in its 9th year and still going strong. This show is a testament to the students and teachers who support the desire and eagerness to create,” said Executive Director of Huntington Arts Council, Marc Courtade.

“We have 46 pieces in the show and the work does not disappoint! Students from across Long Island are participating with work reflecting a variety of media. The imagery is strong and both playful and haunting. We hope you will take the time to stop in and see for yourself the terrific work that these students have created. Our gallery continues to follow safety protocols, all of which are listed on our website,” he added.

The Main Street Gallery, 213 Main St., Huntington will present Nightmare on Main Street through Nov. 7. Hours are Tuesday to Friday, from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. and some Saturdays. Social distancing and masks are required at all times. Please call 631-271-8423 to schedule your visit.

Music and Art by Naomi Diracles

By Melissa Arnold

Looking at a beautiful painting, photo or sculpture can sometimes evoke strong memories or emotions. For many people, the same is true when listening to music. It’s even possible to have a piece of music conjure up an image in the mind’s eye, or for artwork to seem musical.

The Huntington Arts Council is exploring the intersection of visual arts and music in its newest exhibit, Sights and Sounds: Rhythms and Scales, on view at its Main Street Gallery from Feb. 7 through March 14.

The unique subject has been on business manager Kieran Johnson’s mind for some time.

“The overlap of music and visual art has always been a fascination of mine with my favorite visual artists, both contemporary and historical, having their background in music,” Johnson said. “I was reviewing video and listening to tracks from our monthly Singer-Songwriter Night and decided I wanted to do [an exhibit] about auditory and visual art.”

Artists were asked to consider a series of questions as inspiration for their submissions: Does your work exude rhythm, melody, lyrics, harmony or dissonance from a social, political or musical perspective? Does it elicit a reaction in sounds, words or movement? Does it dance or sway? Does it move or move the viewer? Does it sing? 

Johnson called on friend of the Huntington Arts Council Kevin McEvoy to jury the exhibit. McEvoy has worked with the council in a number of capacities, from a member and past juror to panelist and educator.

“Kevin has been a supportive partner in the work we do for over a decade. He is an incredibly skilled artist and arts educator, and his professional and personal background make him an interesting person to know and work with,” Johnson said.

A Long Island native, McEvoy studied fine arts at Stony Brook University and refined his painting skills while in Chile and Italy. He is also the founder of The Atelier at Flowerfield in St. James.

“I’ve always appreciated the relationship of mutual respect and support I’ve had with the Huntington Arts Council. They are so warm and encouraging not just with me, but with all of the artists who approach them,” McEvoy said. “I’ve painted a lot of musicians, musical instruments and music inspired pieces, and I’m excited to jury an exhibit on a subject I feel passionately about.”

In total, 60 artists from across the country submitted 156 pieces for consideration. McEvoy narrowed the field to 44 pieces by 40 artists. The final exhibit includes oil paintings, pastels, graphite drawings, photography and more.

Participating artists include Rose Ann Albanese, Sheri Berman, Zintis Buzermanis, Lisa L. Cangemi, Linda Ann Catucci, Kenneth Cerreta, Kaylynn Chenn, Jody Cukier, Doris Diamond, Naomi Diracles, Vicki Field, Jim Finlayson, Cori Forster, Andrea Fortunoff, Kathleen Gerlach, Roxana Gheorghe, Bill Grabowski, Jan Guarino, Margaret Henning, Nayyar Iqbal, David Jaycox Jr., Wendy June Jensen, Marc Josloff, Julianna Kirk, Beth Laxer-Limmer, Jacques LeBlanc, Stephanie L. Marcus, Kristen Memoli, Margaret Minardi, Mary Nagin, Thais Osorio, Luda Pahl, Eli Rabe, Andrea Rhude, Olivia Rodson, Saul Rosenstreich, Barbara Stein, Victor Vaccaro, Pamela Waldroup and Ella Yang.

“Long Island is a musical place. Our identity is rooted in music and it’s a big part of the culture here, so it’s a natural fit for artists to explore,” McEvoy said. “I tried not to bring any preconceptions of what a piece should look like. Whether it is a lilting line of a kinetic wire sculpture, an atmospheric photo of a violin that almost reads as a mountainscape, or the joyful pluck of an instrument in beautiful pastel colors, indeed, across Long Island, painters, sculptors and musicians are still singing.”

Andrea Fortunoff of Syosset created a digital collage entitled “Dance the Floor: Generations in Rhythm,” depicting dancing people of African heritage in various styles of dress.

“The Huntington Arts Council artist call for Sights and Sounds: Rhythm and Scales spurred me to reflect on the historical synergy between music and dance,” Fortunoff stated in an email. “As an ancient and ephemeral art, dance relies on passing cadence from body to body. My collage is a visual representation of how rhythm and pattern intertwine and are inscribed in a dancer’s memory; reverberating from dancer to dancer through time.”

The exhibit’s opening reception on Friday, Feb. 7 from 6 to 8 p.m. will allow artists and visitors the chance to get to know each other while appreciating the variety of media on display. McEvoy will select a best in show and honorable mention before the reception begins.

“We are thrilled to feature this exhibit and have Kevin McEvoy as the juror. This show is a wonderful depiction of the intertwined nature of art. The work is beautiful and highlights a wide array of artists,” said HAC Executive Director Marc Courtade. “Kevin has been a longtime friend of HAC. His talent, knowledge and contribution to the arts have meant so much to us and the Long Island community. We are looking forward to seeing him at the reception.”

The Huntington Arts Council will present Sights and Sounds: Rhythms and Scales at its Main Street Gallery, 213 Main St., Huntington through March 14. For further information, call 631-271-8423 or visit www.huntingtonarts.org.

The Huntington Arts Council announced the winners of its 8th annual student exhibit, Nightmare on Main Street, at a costume party reception at its Main Street Gallery on Oct. 25. The Halloween-inspired juried art show was open to Nassau and Suffolk counties students in grades 6 to 12 and runs through Nov. 16.

Best in Show in the Junior Division was awarded to “Reaper” by Jack Ruthkowski, an eighth-grader at Finley Middle School in Huntington. Honorable mentions in the same division went to “Half of Me” by Holly Sternlicht and “Phantom” by Fiona Lawrence, both eighth-graders at Weber Middle School in Port Washington and “Lost Inside” by eighth-grader Giada LoPorto from Finley Middle School of Huntington.

“Spider-Web Bat” by Vivienne LaVertu, an 11th-grader at Huntington High School, won first place in the Senior Division. Honorable mentions were awarded to “In the Spotlight” by Julia Crapanzano, ninth grade, Walt Whitman High School; “Demon Doll Tea Party” by Jaelin Woracek, 12th grade, Valley Stream North High School; and “Sprout” by Margaret Marzigliano, 12th grade, Northport High School.

Congratulations to all the winners!