Animals

Jack

MEET JACK IN THE BOX!

Jack

This week’s shelter pet is Jack, a 4½-month-old ginger tabby kitten who arrived at Kent Animal Shelter after he was left on someone’s porch in a box. 

Now he is affectionately known as Jack in the Box by Kent’s volunteers who tell us that this handsome boy is shy but very friendly and loving once he warms up to you. Why not drop by and meet him? He comes neutered, microchipped and up to date on his vaccines. 

Kent Animal Shelter is located at 2259 River Road in Calverton. The adoption center is open seven days a week from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. 

For more information on Jack and other adoptable pets at Kent, call 631-727-5731 or visit www.kentanimalshelter.com

A RARE SIGHT

Cathy Taldone Cammann of Shoreham snapped this photo of a western kingbird in Stony Brook on Oct. 16. She writes, The western kingbird is rare to the East Coast but made its way to West Meadow Wetlands Reserve and had been spotted along Trustees Road that past week.

Send your Photo of the Week to leisure@tbrnewspapers.com

 

Stock photo

By Matthew Kearns, DVM

Dr. Matthew Kearns

When I think of turkeys in the month of November, I usually am thinking about a main course with a little stuffing, potatoes, gravy and cranberry sauce. However, many believe turkeys can also make good pets. Domesticated turkeys are quite friendly and can be socialized to humans and other pets.

Before considering acquiring any turkeys please make sure to consult your neighbors. Turkeys (especially males) will make a gobble sound in reaction to any strange noise and the females will make a variety of sounds. What I mean is, both genders make a lot of noise. 

Make sure there is enough room to exercise. Turkeys need about 90 square feet to be able to properly “shake their tail feathers” and make sure the enclosure has a fence that is at least 6 feet high. Most domesticated turkeys cannot, or will not, attempt to fly over the fence, but it is possible and they may require routine clipping of the flight feathers to prevent a “great escape.” They also need safety from predators at night. A commercially made turkey pen or 8×6-foot garden shed makes a good enclosure. This size shed can house up to more than one turkey. 

Good husbandry is a key. A dirt floor with either hay or shavings is easiest to keep clean and not hard on the turkey’s feet. The hay or shavings should be changed every few days. 

Stock photo

There is also one consideration if you wish to keep both turkeys and chickens as pets. Chickens carry but are not affected by a single-celled parasite called Histomanis meleagridis, leading to a condition known as blackhead. This parasite causes diarrhea, liver damage and sudden death in turkeys. Therefore, do not house the turkeys and chickens together, nor keep the turkeys in an area that has recently been used by chickens. Periodic treatments with anti-parasitc medications also reduce the risk of blackhead. 

Food is easy. Fowl pellets are the mainstay of their diet and they can be bought at any feed store or online. Young turkeys may initially prefer to eat bugs such as crickets, mealworms and beetles but will quickly transition to pellets if you crush the bugs and pellets and mix them together. 

Turkeys also will eat a variety of fruits, vegetables and nuts. Items such as kale, grapes, berries, etc. are all delicious additions to a turkey’s diet. Crushed oyster shells make not only an excellent source of calcium but also help grind food for digestion in a part of the turkey’s stomach called the gizzard.

I have to admit that I don’t own any turkeys, nor have I treated any turkeys but who knows what the future holds. “Gobble, Gobble”!!!!!

Dr. Kearns practices veterinary medicine from his Port Jefferson office and is pictured with his son Matthew and his dog Jasmine. Have a question for the vet? Email it to leisure@tbrnewspapers.com to see his answer in an upcoming column.

King Rotor

MEET KING ROJOR!

King Rotor

This week’s shelter pet is  King Rojor, a mixed-breed dog rescued from the meat trade in Thailand and now safe at Kent Animal Shelter.

King, who weighs approximately 35 pounds,  has a very sweet disposition, and even though he is missing one of his back legs he is still a happy-go-lucky fella! He gets around just fine, and loves to go for walks with the shelter’s volunteers. 

This sweet boy comes neutered, microchipped and up to date on his vaccines. 

Kent Animal Shelter is located at 2259 River Road in Calverton. The adoption center is open seven days a week from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. For more information on King Rojor and other adoptable pets at Kent, call 631-727-5731 or visit www.kentanimalshelter.com.

Update: King Rojor has been adopted!

After 50 years of trials and tribulations, the Commack School District is forging ahead with a plan to use the Marion Carll Farm on Commack Road for educational purposes, but some activists are not happy with the decision. 

Since July, the district has been renting its barns to Long Island University. The site is expected to become the region’s first veterinarian school of medicine by September 2020.

“We expect animals to be on the site by February,” said Superintendent Donald James.

But, Cynthia Clark, a concerned citizen, who formed the Marion Carll Preserve Inc. said she has asked the New York State Attorney General’s Charities Bureau to intervene. Her goal, she said, is to acquire, restore and sustainably run the site in perpetuity according to benefactor Marion Carll’s wishes. 

“For 50 years, the district has squandered this gift,” Clark said. “It’s a crime! A cultural and ethical crime.” 

Clark said that she has commitments with Harbor Harvest to buy organic produce grown on the 9-acre site and can secure grants to restore all buildings. But the district unanimously chose the LIU proposal over her application earlier this year. 

LIU’s proposal, according to an LIU spokesperson, met both the wishes of Marion Carll’s Last Will and Testament along with the Commack School District’s standards for financial viability. The district stated the plan will include providing valuable educational programs to the children of the district. James said that the district expects to implement a shadowing program that will provide an opportunity for students to look at career options that they might not otherwise consider. Animals on the premises will include cows, goats and chickens. The district also expects to offer lessons on beekeeping to the students. 

The site is listed on the National Register of Historic Places and has not been adequately maintained.  Carll’s will, granting the property to the district, stipulates maintaining the buildings as historical museums for educational purposes. Clark sounded the alarm this past summer, she said, when the property was being cleared without appropriate permits and as work commenced to replace the barn’s roof. The state Department of Education has since issued a stop work order.

The home on the Marion Carll Farm in its current condition.

In an interview on the Marion Carll Farm, James said that he expects to have all needed permits before the year’s end. LIU’s rent of $15,000, he said, will fund the stabilization of the house and barn and be used to properly catalog and preserve the contents of the building. After that, the district said it will remove the antiques within the farmhouse while restoration occurs.  

The house is not part of the lease with LIU, but the district is counting on the rental income to finance repairs. LIU, James said, has already spent $700,000 repairing the historical red barn and replacing its roof and clearing dead trees and overgrowth. The university will also cover expenses related to installing historically correct fencing, complete repairs to the barn and other buildings and lend labor to restore the historic home. Over the next 10 years, LIU is committed to spend $175,000, James said, and the district is committed to spend $350,000, which is the savings associated with LIU maintaining the entire property. 

Clark, who is a preservation specialist for leather clothing and furniture, estimates that the restoration project will cost $2.5 million plus another $1.5 million to restore the furnishings in the house. The preserve, she said, applied for nonprofit 501(c)(3) status last year, but the application is still pending. She said that she’s already spent thousands of her own money on the project, but expects to be able to secure the funds she needs through grants and said in a telephone interview that she is aligned with a successful grant writer with a “100 percent track record.” She could not provide the name. 

Clark’s plan was one of several options that the district considered earlier this year. The district ultimately chose the Long Island University lease, largely because of its long-term economic viability.  

Long Island University’s College of Veterinary Medicine spokesperson Mary  Studdert stated in an email that it has received a Letter of Reasonable Assurance from the American Veterinary Medical Association’s Council on Education (AVMA-COE) enabling LIU to immediately begin accepting applications for the fall 2020 semester. At full enrollment, the veterinary school will serve 400 students, with 100 in each graduating class and will be the first College of Veterinary Medicine in the New York Metropolitan area.

The conflict with Clark arises just years after the district was sued by the Carll heirs to revert ownership back to the Carll heirs because of the district’s failure to fulfill the will’s obligations. The district ultimately won the 2012 case in summary judgment on statute of limitation grounds, stating that the heirs were 12 years too late. Restrictions on the district’s obligations were lifted to clear title, according to board member Jarret Behar. James said that the district could now legally sell the site, if it wanted to, but said the board is committed to its preservation and use as a historical museum with educational purposes. 

The house, according to the district, is structurally sound, but part of the building is still taking on rain. The main structure is covered with a rubber membrane to control leaks, but James said in an email that more leaks formed in different places and need to be fixed. The stop work order, he said, is now yet another hurdle that interferes with the district’s efforts to properly maintain the site.

One of many structures on the 9-acre Marion Carll Farm.

Clark said that she can reveal no details about her conversations with the attorney general’s office but said that she is hopeful. 

The Carll family was one of Huntington’s earliest settlers and Marion Carll was Commack’s first teacher. She died in 1968 and willed the site to the district. The site was occupied by a Carll family member until 1993, as stipulated in the will. The district leased part of the site to BOCES from 1990 to 2000 and sought to sell the farm to developers for $750,000 in 2010, but the public referendum failed. 

Over the years, different school boards have had different ideas on how to use the property. James, who grew up on a farm in Pennsylvania, said that the board is committed to doing what’s best for the district. 

Brookhaven Town Supervisor Ed Romaine with Pam Green, executive director of Kent Animal Shelter and her dog, Frodo. Photo courtesy of Kent Animal Shelter

Brookhaven Town Supervisor Ed Romaine (R) awarded a proclamation to Kent Animal Shelter on Oct. 15 citing its 50 years of dedicated work for the betterment of animal welfare. 

Long recognized for being a small shelter doing monumental work, the Kent Animal Shelter has operated since its incorporation in 1969 as an organization dedicated to helping homeless animals. Since its beginning in its humble space along the scenic Peconic River in Calverton, the shelter has given refuge to over 35,000 homeless animals. 

A humane bedrock in East End communities, it gradually extended its reach throughout Long Island and the tri-state area and now rescues and rehabilitates abandoned, abused and homeless animals throughout the U.S. and neighboring countries especially during crisis situations. 

Programs include rescue, adoption, low-cost spay/neuter and humane education. To date, over 50,000 animals have been spayed or neutered to help control animal overpopulation. Over the years, plans to expand the shelter have been blocked by town and government regulatory agencies due to zoning and restrictions within the Pine Barrens. 

“Our efforts will not be thwarted, and the shelter fully intends to rebuild its facility on its current footprint. We are grateful to Ed Romaine and the Town of Brookhaven for recognizing and always supporting the vital efforts of the shelter to make a difference in the lives of companion animals,” said Pam Green, executive director at Kent. 

Kent Animal Shelter is a 501(c)(3) organization, no-kill that operates solely on the generosity of individuals and foundations. For more information, call 631-727-5731 or visit www.kentanimalshelter.com.

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Sally

MEET SALLY!

This week’s shelter pet is Sally, a 1½-year-old heeler mix rescued by Kent Animal Shelter from Texas, where sadly many dogs are euthanized. Sally is one of the lucky ones and is very grateful to have a second chance at life! She is eager to please and loves to go for walks with our volunteers. All she needs is a new home. Come on down to visit her!

Sally comes spayed, microchipped and up to date on her vaccines. 

Kent Animal Shelter is located at 2259 River Road in Calverton. The adoption center is open seven days a week from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. For more information on Sally and other adoptable pets at Kent, call 631-727-5731 or visit www.kentanimalshelter.com.

Fred and Ginger

MEET FRED AND GINGER!

Check out these cuties! 

Recent arrivals from South Carolina, Ginger (white) and Fred (black and white) are 2-month-old Chihuahua puppies currently up for adoption at Kent Animal Shelter. They’re brother and sister and come as a pair, just in time to dress them up for Halloween! Both are so sweet, love to cuddle and give kisses! 

Kent Animal Shelter is located at 2259 River Road in Calverton. The adoption center is open seven days a week from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. For more information on Fred, Ginger and other adoptable pets at Kent, call 631-727-5731 or visit www.kentanimalshelter.com.

Update: Fred and Ginger have been adopted!

Blue

MEET BLUE!

Blue

This week’s shelter pet is Blue, a 2-year-old husky mix from Puerto Rico. Blue may look familiar to our readers — he was featured in the paper back in November of 2017. He was adopted from Kent Animal Shelter and then brought back because the owners fell on hard times. 

Blue, who sports one blue eye and one brown eye, would love a big backyard to run around in and would be best in a home without kids. Once he knows you he’s the sweetest boy! Come on down to the shelter and meet him!

Blue comes neutered, microchipped and up to date on all his vaccines.

Kent Animal Shelter is located at 2259 River Road in Calverton. The adoption center is open seven days a week from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. For more information on Blue and other adoptable pets at Kent, call 631-727-5731 or visit www.kentanimalshelter.com.

A NEW PLACE TO ROOST?

One of our readers snapped this amusing photo back in September. She writes, ‘We have so many wonderful photos of the naturally beautiful — even spectacular —Three Village area.  I met these two civic-minded, prospective Poquott neighbors as I was driving home a few weeks ago . . . and I could not resist the shot.

Send your Photo of the Week to leisure@tbrnewspapers.com