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Reboli Center for Art and History

UP CLOSE AND PERSONAL

Volunteers from Sweetbriar Nature Center in Smithtown took to the road last Saturday afternoon in support of the arts.

Program coordinator Veronica Sayers visited the Reboli Center for Art and History in Stony Brook Village to introduce the community to Seven the Barred owl; Stitch the red-tailed hawk; Winter the rabbit; Gary the duck; and a bluejay named Little Blue. The well-attended event was in conjunction with the Reboli’s current exhibit, Wild and Wonderful, by Vicki Sawyer.

Long-time Sweetbriar volunteer Dan DeFeo headed to Gallery North for a sold-out Raptor Sketch Night event, below, and introduced the artists to another barred owl and red-tailed hawk, a barn owl, and a Great Horned owl. — Heidi Sutton

Photo courtesy of Sweetbriar Nature Center

UP CLOSE AND PERSONAL

Sweetbriar Nature Center heads to Stony Brook and Setauket for special family friendly events on Saturday, Sept. 26.

Sweetbriar visits Reboli Center

In perfect harmony with its current exhibit, Wild and Wonderful by Vicki Sawyer, the Reboli Center for Art and History, 64 Main St., Stony Brook welcomes the staff of Sweetbriar Nature Center and some of its resident animals including owls for an outdoor nature talk from 2 to 3 p.m. Rain date is Sept. 27. Free. To make a reservation, call 751-7707 or email [email protected]

Sweetbriar Raptor Sketch Night

Join Gallery North, 90 North Country Road, Setauket for a special Raptor Sketch Night from 3 to 5 p.m. Sweetbriar  Nature Center in Smithtown will bring over birds of prey for a workshop that will bring nature lovers and artists together for a unique evening of sketching and learning. $40 per person, $60 for a family of four includes all materials. To register, visit www.gallerynorth.org/thestudio. For more info, call 751-2676.

‘View from the Red Room’ by Joseph Reboli

By Melissa Arnold

For more than three decades, Joseph Reboli dedicated his life to creating art and sharing it with the world. His vibrant oil paintings, many of which focused on scenes in the Three Village area, were beloved not only here on Long Island but around the world for the way they captured the essence of the places he loved. Reboli’s work has been on display in museums, private collections and homes around the world.

Since its founding in 2016, the Reboli Center for Art and History in Stony Brook has worked to preserve the legacy of its namesake, who died in 2004, while also highlighting the people and places that most inspired him. Its newest exhibit, on display beginning Nov. 1, will focus on one of Reboli’s unique honors: his inclusion in an exhibit at the White House.

“Joe was a very modest guy, but I think he was really honored by this opportunity, and it was one of the highlights of his career,” said Lois Reboli, Joe’s wife of 14 years.

In 2000, the nation’s capital was preparing to mark the 200th anniversary of the White House. To celebrate, the White House Historical Association planned an art exhibit and companion calendar titled White House Impressions: The President’s House Through the Eye of the Artist. The association selected 14 well-respected artists to participate, with one artist representing each of the 13 original colonies and the District of Columbia. 

Among the chosen artists were Reboli, who represented New York for the month of March, as well as realist painter Ken Davies of Massachusetts, Reboli’s former professor at the Paier College of Art, representing February. 

The cover of the 2000 White House calendar.

The other artists were Domenic DiStefano (Pennsylvania, December 1999), Al Alexander (New Jersey, January 2000), Ray Ellis (Georgia, April 2000), John Barber (Virginia, May 2000), Marjorie Egee (Delaware, June 2000), Marilyn Caldwell (Connecticut, July 2000), Tom Freeman (Maryland, August 2000), West Fraser (South Carolina, September 2000), Richard Grosvenor (Rhode Island, October 2000), Carol Aronson-Shore (New Hampshire, November 2000) and Bob Timberlake (North Carolina, December 2000). Carlton Fletcher of the District of Columbia was granted the cover.

“We made the trip down to the White House in 1999, and the artists got to meet with Bill and Hillary Clinton. It was our first trip to the White House, and definitely impressive to us both,” Lois Reboli recalled. “Joe had been in the Army and he was a very patriotic person. A White House photographer walked around with each artist as they decided what they wanted their piece to be — the photographer was the only one allowed to take pictures. Then the artists took the photos home to work.”

Reboli was the only artist in the White House exhibit to choose a point of view from inside the building. His painting, “View from the Red Room,” looks outside to the South Portico with the Jefferson Memorial in the background. 

The Red Room has served a variety of purposes in different presidencies, from a music room to a meeting space, the backdrop for official photos and family dinners. First Lady Jackie Kennedy once said that the view from the Red Room was her favorite in the White House because it looked out on the American people. 

“When I saw this particular view, I loved the light on the South Portico with the landscape in the background,” Reboli wrote at the time about his choice. “The light’s reflection on the portico contrasted nicely with the dark interior of the room.”   

The painting from the Red Room will be on display at the Reboli Center, along with the White House calendar and original work from nine of the 14 artists featured in the 2000 exhibit, said Reboli Center secretary Colleen Hanson.

“This exhibit was a huge undertaking, and took a lot of detective work in some cases. Lois has been working on this exhibit for more than 8 months. It was a search for contacts with the artists of the calendar, communicating back and forth, and then finally getting the artwork. This was a rather complicated exhibit to put together because of the number of artists involved, the time span of an event that happened more than 20 years ago, and the fact that during those 20 years not everyone had stayed put and that deaths had occurred,” Hanson said. 

“We wanted to share the work the artists did for the White House as well as some of their original work to give a greater sense of who they were and their artistic interests.”

The White House Calendar exhibit will be on display from Nov. 1 through Jan. 26, 2020 at the Reboli Center for Art and History, 64 Main St., Stony Brook. Participating artists include Al Alexander, Carol Aronson-Shore, Marilyn Caldwell, Ken Davies, Domenic DiStefano, Ray Ellis, West Fraser, Richard Grosvenor and the late Joe Reboli. For more information, call 631- 751-7707 or visit www.rebolicenter.org.

'Autumn Pumpkins'

The Reboli Center for Art and History, 64 Main St., Stony Brook will host an Autumn Painting Party on Wednesday, Nov. 6 from 7 to 9:30 p.m. For a registration fee of $45, each participant will complete a new painting in the style of Joseph Reboli. The subject matter for this event will be Autumn Pumpkins, a wonderful painting to hang this season. All supplies are included, and no experience is necessary.  

To register, please call 631-751-7707.

'Harbor Reflections' by Angela Stratton

Reboli Center for Art and History, 64 Main St., Stony Brook will host a summer exhibit by the Setauket Artists from July 23 to Aug. 4. 

‘Stony Brook Village’ by Joan Bloom

The show, curated by Irene Ruddock, will feature over thirty paintings with many of the paintings reflecting the beauty of Long Island.

Participating artists include Lana Ballot, Ross Barbera, Shain Bard, Eleanor Berger, Joan Bloom, Renee Caine, Al Candia, Gail L. Chase, Jeanette Dick, Marge Governale, Peter Hahn, Anne Katz, Flo Kemp, Karen Kemp, Michael R. Kutzing, Jane McGraw Teubner, Terence McManus, Eleanor Meier, Fred Mendelsohn, Muriel Musarra, Paula Pelletier, Joan Rockwell, Robert Roehrig, Irene Ruddock, Oscar Santiago, Barbara Jeanne Siegel, Angela Stratton, Laura Westlake, Marlene Weinstein and Patricia Yantz.

‘Last Goodbye’ by Lana Ballot

 The Reboli Center is pleased to welcome the group to our wonderful building,” said Lois Reboli, President of the Reboli Center.

Don’t miss the Reboli Center’s summertime display of paintings that adhere to the Setauket Artists motto, “Art for a Lifetime.”  Join the artists for a reception July 25 from 5 to 7 p.m.

The Reboli Center is open Tuesdays through Saturdays from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. and Sundays from 1 to 5 p.m.  1For additional information call 631-751-7707 or visit www.ReboliCenter.org. To learn more about the Setauket Artists visit www.setauketartists.com or call 631-365-1312.

'Summer Cottage'

You’re invited to a special event! The Reboli Center for Art and History located at 64 Main St. in Stony Brook will hold its 7th Painting Party on Wednesday, June 5 from 7 to 9:30 p.m.  The painting parties are always a total sell out, so be sure to register early to insure that you are part of the fun!   For a registration fee of $45, each participant will complete a new painting in the style of Joseph Reboli!  The subject matter for this event will be Summer Cottage, a wonderful summer painting to hang this season!  All supplies are included, and no experience is necessary.

The instructor for the evening is Linda Davison Mathues, an award winning, professional artist with representation in many Long Island art galleries.  Recognizing that there is a real interest in picking up a brush and painting in a fun social atmosphere, Linda and Eileen Sanger formed The Winey Painters.   Their strategies bring something unique to the painting party experience. The projects always are carefully planned around a famous artist, at the Reboli Center that artist is Joseph Reboli. Linda delves into just what makes a particular artist paint in a unique style.  Artists, past and present, lived very interesting lives, and The Painting Party combines art history with the painting.  With Linda’s many years of teaching experience, everyone leaves happy and sometimes amazed at their own hidden talent.

A reminder, Painting Party Seven has a limited enrollment, so sign up early.  To register, come to the Reboli Center or call 631-751-7707 during business hours, Tuesday – Saturday from 11 – 5 or Sunday from 1 – 5.

Come join the Painting Party and have a great time making your own Reboli masterpiece!

 

 

 

The Reboli Center for Art and History,  located at 64 Main St. in Stony Brook Village is offering another fun and informational workshop with Diana Conklin of Everlastings by Diana on Saturday, Nov. 10 from 9 to 11 a.m. In this workshop, participants will create a charming vibrant colored wreath for your indoor wall using hand-colored dried hydrangeas. 

Many color choices are available: fresh blue, blue burgundy, green with coral, orange, violet and burgundy blushes.  The complete wreath size is approximately 12 inches. You’ll be encouraged to explore your own style within the demonstrated framework. All materials are provided and, of course, you’ll take your creation home with you!

Diana is a well-known designer and dried flower grower whose wreaths and floral arrangements are much prized. Her creations are beautiful and she will help workshop participants craft a unique personal wreath using her beautifully hand-colored dried flowers. Diana will also share her passion for growing, drying and working with flowers. Attendance is limited. The workshop fee is $45. To register, please call 631-751-7707 or email [email protected]

‘Cassio’ by Dino Rinaldi

By Melissa Arnold

‘Stable Door’ by Joseph Reboli

Horses, whether ridden, raced, bred or simply beloved, have long been a part of Long Island’s culture. From the Belmont Stakes in Nassau to the Smithtown Hunt and the Old Field Farm in Suffolk, the majestic animals hold a special place in the hearts of many.

Among them was the late artist Joe Reboli, whose 30-year career was defined by bringing both famous places and ordinary views of the Three Village area to life with great care and realism.

The Reboli Center for Art and History in Stony Brook was founded in 2016 to celebrate Reboli’s life and honor the history of the place he called home. Since then, the center has created a number of exhibits blending Reboli’s work with local artists as well as artifacts from Long Island’s past.

On Tuesday, the center opened an exciting  new exhibit, Artistry: The Horse in Art, which will focus on horses and their environment through a variety of mediums. Among the Reboli works in the exhibit is “The Stable Door,” an oil-on-canvas painting.

Roberto Dutesco’s ‘Love’ will be on exhibit at the Reboli Center through Oct. 28.

“Joe had a way of capturing this community that evoked such wonderful feelings from people,” said Reboli Center co-founder Colleen Hanson. “His painting of a stable door in our exhibit was done for [the late publisher] John McKinney. Joe’s ability to paint white was just astounding — there is more to the color white than many people realize; there are so many shades and hues in it and he captured them all.”

In addition to work from Reboli, the exhibit will highlight three other main artists. Roberto Dutesco, a Romanian-born Canadian artist, is well known for his fashion photography. But in 1994, Dutesco began to explore nature photography with a trip to Sable Island, nearly 200 miles off the coast of Nova Scotia. There he photographed the island’s breathtaking wild horses. He has returned to the island six times since then with the goal of inspiring greater conservation efforts through his work. 

‘Zidette’ by Dino Rinaldi

Dino Rinaldi is a Port Jefferson native whose winding career has taken him from illustration to advertising and finally painting full time. As a teen, Rinaldi recalls opening up an issue of the local newspaper and seeing a painting of gasoline pumps by Reboli. 

“I looked at it and thought, someday I want to be able to paint like that. It moved me,” said Rinaldi, who now lives in Setauket with his wife and daughter. “To be able to create art for a living is a dream come true.” Keep an eye out for “Zidette,” Rinaldi’s graphite powder-and-pencil drawing.

Elena Hull Cournot, who originally hails from East Setauket, now provides creative arts therapy in the West Village and owns a studio in Brooklyn. Horses are a mainstay of Cournot’s work, who is known for her large commissioned paintings of horses and soulful works created during her time as an artist in residence at the Burren College of Art in Ireland. Like storytellers who seek to capture the personal essence of their subjects, Cournot strives to spend time with each horse she paints. One of those horses was “Indie,” whose oil-on-canvas portrait is featured in the gallery.

The center’s history gallery will focus on events and places that include horses in a prominent role. The Smithtown Hunt is the only surviving foxhound hunt on Long Island. While it was originally a live hunt when it was first held in 1900, it is now exclusively a drag hunt. The Old Field Farm was built by Ward Melville in 1931 and continues to be a hot spot for the equestrian community. 

“Every year, we sit down and talk about what kind of exhibits we’d like to have. We look at different community events that are going on, and then work to determine the artists we might feature and a theme based around that,” Hanson explained. “This is such an interesting and fun show — there are so many people who love horses and have owned or ridden them at some point. They are beautiful, intelligent creatures that have a wide appeal.”

Hanson also joked that her own history was a factor in the decision. In the decade she spent as the director of Gallery North in Setauket, not a single exhibit featured a horse. Thanks to this exhibit, she’s now hung more than 30 horse paintings, drawings and photos.

The center will hold several special free events during the exhibit’s run, each coinciding with Third Friday activities in the area. Dino Rinaldi and Roberto Dutesco will be at the center Aug. 17; Leighton Coleman, Sally Lynch and Edmunde Stewart will be welcomed on Sept. 21; and on Oct. 19 there will be a screening of the documentary “Snowman,” which tells the story of a simple workhorse saved from the slaughterhouse by a Long Island man. Snowman went on to become a national show jumping champion.   

See Artistry: The Horse in Art through Oct. 28 at the Reboli Center for Art and History, 64 Main St., Stony Brook. Admission is free. For information, call 631-751-7707 or visit www.rebolicenter.org. 

'Hydrangea Cottage' by Joseph Reboli

STONY BROOK: Following the overwhelming response from its previous painting events, The Reboli Center for Art and History, 64 Main St., Stony Brook will host its fourth Painting Party on Wednesday, May 16 from 7 to 9:30 p.m.

The instructors for the evening, Eileen Sanger and Linda Davison Mathues of The Winey Painters, will lead participants in creating a new painting using Joseph Reboli’s “Hydrangea Cottage” as inspiration. Artists, past and present, lived very interesting lives, and The Winey Painters will combine art history with the painting. 

With the instructors’ many years of teaching experience, everyone leaves happy and sometimes amazed at their own hidden talent. Registration fee is $45 per person and includes all supplies. No experience needed. To sign up, drop by the Reboli Center or call 631-751-7707.

A beautiful heart wreath in your décor is something special, but a beautiful heart wreath made by you is even better! Just in time for Valentine’s Day, the Reboli Center for Art and History in Stony Brook Village will host a Heart Wreath Workshop on Saturday, Feb. 3 from 10 to 11:30 a.m.

With the guidance of Diana Conklin from Everlastings by Diana, you’ll get to make a Pinterest-worthy wreath using hand-colored dried herbs (lavender, Artemesia annua and more), hydrangea and other dried botanicals that symbolize love to display in your home. You’ll be encouraged to explore your own style within the demonstrated framework. All materials are provided and, of course, you’ll take your creation home with you! Workshop fee is $45. To register, call 631-751-7707 or visit the Reboli Center, 64 Main St., Stony Brook.