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Reboli Center for Art and History

1962 GTO

The Reboli Center for Art and History in Stony Brook is beaming with excitement to announce its June Artisan of the Month … Nelson Medina! Medina, who hails from the Bronx, is well known in the automobile industry nationwide for his meticulous hand crafted, pinstriping work and is now becoming more recognized for his incredibly detailed and expressive oil and acrylic paintings on canvas.

1957 Ferrari Testarossa

According to Medina, “I grew up in one of the most eventful cities in the world when the automobile industry was exploding with beautiful and powerful vehicles … a very cool period to have experienced. It was the summer of 1964 and I was 11 years old. I witnessed a gentleman pinstriping while on a night out with my parents … we stopped for maybe 15 minutes at the most … it was so impressive … the rest is history.”

Medina explained to the Reboli Center’s staff that, “All my talent comes from my Dad who was a true master sculptor in the field of wax for the jewelry trade. I always knew that I held a penchant for creativity and through time, dedication and determination, I’ve come to understand how to unite my body with my soul so they may perform as one doing what I love … this art form has allowed me the ability to express myself in many arenas… creating with color, balance and flavor.”

He also shared with us about a car accident that he experienced a few years ago. It was after this accident that he learned to develop an intense and inspiring love for his work on canvas. Painting quickly became Medina’s mistress.

1957 Ferrari 625

Thankfully, over time, he has developed a harmonious dance between designing, painting and pinstriping. Needless to say the Reboli Center is so very honored to have Nelson’s work featured in its gallery and also to have his help in the planning and execution of their current exhibition, Shifting Gears, and its related events. Medina’s work will be on display at the Reboli Center until July 18. You can also meet the artist by attending one of the Center”s Sunday Car Shows

The Reboli Center, 64 Main Street Stony Brook is free, and open Tuesday – Saturday from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. and Sunday from 1 p.m. to 5 p.m.   For more information on the Artisan of the Month, please call the Center at 631-751-7707.

Original and restored 1928 BMW motorcycles on display at The Reboli Center.
Collector Peter Nettesheim and his daughter, Kate, with their BMW motorcycles

The Reboli Center for Art & History is keeping on track with its current exhibit, Shifting Gears, which focuses on the “art” of transportation by selecting Peter Nettesheim as its Artisan for the Month of May. Nettesheim was chosen because the exhibit features both an original 1928 BMW motorcycle and a refurbished one from his private collection, and he is known for his extraordinary collection and knowledge, said Lois Reboli and BJ Intini, founders of the Reboli Center.

Collecting and restoring cars runs in his family. His father was a Mercedes Benz collector, which spurred Peter’s interest in collecting, but he took a different route by going with BMW motorcycles and cars as he thought the Mercedes was more of an old man’s car and the BMW sportier. Peter bought his first bike in 1979, and he has since created the world’s largest collection of BMW motorcycles. According to Peter, he has virtually every regular production model from 1923 through 1970 and another 35 or so of them after that date. He has now amassed a collection of more than 120 BMW cycles, including 10 cars.  His passion is to collect and refurbish old and classic BMW motorcycles and cars. He has about 90 that are in perfect running condition. His massive collection of bikes, cars, artifacts and BMW memorabilia are displayed in a museum at his home in Huntington.

Musician and motorcycle enthusiast Billy Joel at the Nettesheim Museum

Peter Nettesheim and his collection are well known throughout the world and both are highly respected by those in the industry. Celebrities and motorcycle enthusiasts like Billy Joel, Jay Leno, Ryan Reynolds and Lyle Lovett have visited his home/museum. The Nettesheim Museum is only open by prior arrangement, and if you have any questions regarding the history of the BMW brand, please contact Peter Nettesheim at [email protected]

Located at 64 Main Street in Stony Brook, The Reboli Center is free, and open Tuesday to Saturday from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. and Sunday from 1 p.m. to 5 p.m.  For more information on the Artisan of the Month, please call the Center at 631-751-7707.

The Reboli Center for Art and History, 64 Main Street, Stony Brook is pleased to name Janet Zug as its artisan of the month for April. “I discovered Janet while looking for some handmade glass for the Design Shop.  I searched the internet and found several glass blowers, but I loved her pieces and contacted her. Janet agreed to sell her work at the Center, and we have done very well with her beautiful creations,” said Lois Reboli, founder of the Reboli Center and wife of the late artist, Joseph Reboli.

• Janet Zug at work in in her studio

Janet started blowing glass in 1990. She answered an ad in the local newspaper for a glass blower apprentice and no experience was necessary. The position was with Simon Pearce, a famous glass production studio in Vermont. She got the job and after five days, fell in love with the art of glass blowing. When she was done for the day, she was allowed to work on her own designs. In 1992, she founded her own business and rented space from other studios to make her creations. In 2004, she installed her own hot shop at her studio in Vermont, where she lives.

According to Janet, “I am inspired by function and beauty. A piece should be useful and pretty, such as my hanging vases. I love making drinking glasses as you can use them, enjoy them, wash them and they are so personal. There are so many things I love about glassblowing. First there’s the hot stuff itself, what a crazy medium to play with! Then there’s the challenge of executing high quality work from this pot of hot goo. I never get tired of it because it’s always changing. Blowing glass is the best part, of course, but being a productive business person is equally as important as designing work that I am proud of.”

Janet Zug’s drinking glasses

Her studio is open on Saturdays from Thanksgiving until Christmas and visitors can take a class, where she will help someone make a piece. For more information, visit her website at www.zugglassblower.com

Janet Zug’s hand-blown glass is for sale in the Reboli Center’s Design Shop. The Center is  open Tuesday – Saturday from 11 a.m. – 5 p.m. and Sunday from 1 p.m. – 5 p.m.

Lois Reboli, president of the Reboli Center, noted that, “The Center is adhering to CDC, New York State and Suffolk County coronavirus guidelines, which limits the number of attendees at one time and requires all visitors to wear a mask and socially distance. Please be assured that staff and volunteers will wear masks, and do continuous cleaning and sanitizing.

For more information, call 631-751-7707.

 

Photo courtesy of Reboli Center

The Reboli Center for Art and History, 64 Main St., Stony Brook is inviting entries from now until April 21 for a unique fundraising exhibition, Miniatures to Make a Maximum Impact! All participating artists will have their artwork exhibited in the Reboli Design Shop throughout the month of May. “Miniature art has been venerated throughout history, and today there are Miniature Art Societies around the world. The delicate beauty and refinement of these works can be truly amazing.  Now we’re asking contemporary artists of all styles to “paint small” to help support our center and programs in a major way,” said Lois Reboli, a founder of the Reboli Center and the wife of the late artist Joseph Reboli.

“One free canvas will be given to each participant to create for our cause. All entries will be considered as a donation to the Reboli Center, a 501 (c) (3) organization, and all proceeds raised from the sale of each submitted artwork for this event will be used for our free programming and exhibitions,” added Reboli.

Contributing artists may also use their own stretched canvas, linen or panel, which must not exceed 36 square inches (6 inches x 6 inches). Any painting medium is acceptable, and framing is optional. Artists are welcome to submit up to five entries. The artwork must be your own original concept and not a copy of anyone else’s copyrighted material.

To request a free canvas and application, please contact the Reboli Center at 631-751-7707 or email [email protected] An application may also be downloaded under Events at www.rebolicenter.org

Artist Jessica Randall

The Reboli Center for Art & History in Stony Brook has named Jessica Randall as its Artisan of the Month for February.

“Jessica’s innovative and intricate work is extraordinary and beautiful,” said Lois Reboli, founder of the Reboli Center and wife of the late renowned artist, Joseph Reboli, for whom the center is named.

A graduate of the Massachusetts College of Art and Design, Randall is an artist, silversmith and jewelry designer whose studio is located in Setauket. She has been designing and making original jewelry for over 20 years, and is inspired by found objects and nature, particularly the sea. Her pieces are designed to be worn everyday as wearable artwork.

A pair of earrings by Jessica Randall

According to Randall, “My jewelry is actually made of “Argentium Sterling Silver,” “Sterling Silver” and/or “24K Gold Vermeil.” This is an important distinction because “24K gold” implies solid gold, which this jewelry is not. “Vermeil” is a French word; it is an industry- standard term that specifically means a layer of 24K gold plating 2.5 microns thick, over a base metal of Sterling Silver. These pieces are made in Sterling Silver and then plated in 24K gold.”

Several years ago, Randall won “Best in Show” for “Mandala Bra,” which was featured in the “Bodacious Bras for a Cure” exhibition at The Wang Center at Stony Brook University. “I was honored to receive this award; but what I felt best about was being able to donate the proceeds from the sale of this piece to Stony Brook University Cancer Center,” said Randall.

“I am proud to be featured as the Artisan of the Month at the Reboli Center as I am an avid fan of Joe’s work! I am especially drawn to the element of mystery that seems to permeate his paintings. There is an aspect of the surreal in many of his beautifully lit, incredibly detailed images of daily life,” she said.

Randall’s winning “Mandala Bra” with cut shells, Mother of Pearl, semi- precious stones, hand-sewn onto bra

Visitors, fans and those in need of a Valentine’s gift will have an opportunity to meet Randall at The Reboli Center on Saturday, February 6, and Saturday, February 13, from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. for two special Valentine’s Day Pop up events! She will be more than happy to help you pick out something special for you or a loved one!

Lois Reboli, president of the Reboli Center, noted that, “The Center is adhering to New York State and Suffolk County coronavirus guidelines, which limits the number of attendees at one time and requires all visitors to wear a mask and socially distance. Please be assured that staff and volunteers will wear masks, and do continuous cleaning and sanitizing.”

Randall’s jewelry is for sale in the Reboli Center’s Design Shop. Located at 64 Main St., Stony Brook, admission to the Center is free, and hours are Tuesday to Saturday from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. and Sunday from 1 p.m. to 5 p.m  Masks must be worn, and social distancing is required. For more information on the Artisan of the Month, please call the Reboli Center at 631-751-7707.

 

The Reboli Center
A hand fabricated cuff bracelet by Jessica Randall

During this holiday season, The Reboli Center for Art and History, 64 Main Street, Stony Brook welcomes Jessica Randall and Renee Fondacaro to set up Pop Up Shops on Dec. 5 from 11 a m. to 6 p.m. and Dec. 6 from 1 p.m. until 6 p.m. All are welcome to visit and shop for something original and handmade.

Jessica Randall is an artist, silversmith and jewelry designer whose studio is located in Setauket, NY. She has been designing and making jewelry for over 20 years, and is inspired by found objects and nature, particularly the sea. Her pieces are designed to be worn everyday as wearable artwork. Jessica’s jewelry is 24K gold.

A candle from Old Field Apothecary

Renee Fondacaro, founder of Old Field Apothecary, creates hand poured, small batch candles, wax melts and home accessories. All products are made from a vegan wax blend of natural coconut and apricot. The waxes are gluten-free, toxin free, paraben free, phthalate free, and come from renewable sources.  The entire blend utilizes only FDA approved waxes.

While there, visitors are welcome to enjoy the Center’s current exhibit, Celebrate the Season, with artwork from local artists, and the Center’s Design Shop. Masks must be worn, and social distancing is required. For further information, please call the Reboli Center at 631-751-7707.

The Reboli Center for Art and History in Stony Brook presents its holiday inspired exhibit, “Celebrate the Season” from Nov. 5 to Jan. 24, 2021. The show will feature the artwork of 22 local artists along with works by the late Joseph Reboli, the Long Island based artist for whom the Center is named.

Participating artists include Al Candia; Casey Chalem Anderson; Donna Crinnian; Linda Davidson Mathues; Grainne de Buitlear; Julie Doczi; Molly Dougenis; Pam Herbst; Liz Kolligs; Joanne Liff; John Mansueto; Lynn Mara; Jim Molloy; Karen Osti; Joseph Reboli; Doug Reina; Irene Ruddock; Gia Schifano; Mike Stanko; Ty Stroudsberg; Hal Usher; Mary Jane Van Zeijts; Laura Westlake and Patty Yantz.

In addition, the Design Shop is the envy of Santa’s workshop as it is decorated for the holidays and stocked with beautiful, unique and handcrafted gifts for all of your family and friends. There is truly something for everyone of all ages in the festive shop, including jewelry, ornaments, crafts, books, scarves and art. Free gift wrapping is available while you enjoy the holiday spirit at the Center.

“The Center is adhering to New York State and Suffolk County coronavirus guidelines, which limits the number of attendees at one time and requires all visitors to wear a mask and socially distance. Please be assured that staff and volunteers will wear masks, and do continuous cleaning and sanitizing,” said Lois Reboli, president of the Reboli Center.

The Reboli Center for Art and History is located at 64 Main Street in Stony Brook Village. Hours are Tuesday to Saturday from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. and Sunday from 1 to 5 p.m. Between November 27 and December 24 the Center will have extended hours and select pop up shops so be sure to visit the gallery’s website at www.ReboliCenter.org. For more information, call 631-751-7707.

UP CLOSE AND PERSONAL

Volunteers from Sweetbriar Nature Center in Smithtown took to the road last Saturday afternoon in support of the arts.

Program coordinator Veronica Sayers visited the Reboli Center for Art and History in Stony Brook Village to introduce the community to Seven the Barred owl; Stitch the red-tailed hawk; Winter the rabbit; Gary the duck; and a bluejay named Little Blue. The well-attended event was in conjunction with the Reboli’s current exhibit, Wild and Wonderful, by Vicki Sawyer.

Long-time Sweetbriar volunteer Dan DeFeo headed to Gallery North for a sold-out Raptor Sketch Night event, below, and introduced the artists to another barred owl and red-tailed hawk, a barn owl, and a Great Horned owl. — Heidi Sutton

Photo courtesy of Sweetbriar Nature Center

UP CLOSE AND PERSONAL

Sweetbriar Nature Center heads to Stony Brook and Setauket for special family friendly events on Saturday, Sept. 26.

Sweetbriar visits Reboli Center

In perfect harmony with its current exhibit, Wild and Wonderful by Vicki Sawyer, the Reboli Center for Art and History, 64 Main St., Stony Brook welcomes the staff of Sweetbriar Nature Center and some of its resident animals including owls for an outdoor nature talk from 2 to 3 p.m. Rain date is Sept. 27. Free. To make a reservation, call 751-7707 or email [email protected]

Sweetbriar Raptor Sketch Night

Join Gallery North, 90 North Country Road, Setauket for a special Raptor Sketch Night from 3 to 5 p.m. Sweetbriar  Nature Center in Smithtown will bring over birds of prey for a workshop that will bring nature lovers and artists together for a unique evening of sketching and learning. $40 per person, $60 for a family of four includes all materials. To register, visit www.gallerynorth.org/thestudio. For more info, call 751-2676.

‘View from the Red Room’ by Joseph Reboli

By Melissa Arnold

For more than three decades, Joseph Reboli dedicated his life to creating art and sharing it with the world. His vibrant oil paintings, many of which focused on scenes in the Three Village area, were beloved not only here on Long Island but around the world for the way they captured the essence of the places he loved. Reboli’s work has been on display in museums, private collections and homes around the world.

Since its founding in 2016, the Reboli Center for Art and History in Stony Brook has worked to preserve the legacy of its namesake, who died in 2004, while also highlighting the people and places that most inspired him. Its newest exhibit, on display beginning Nov. 1, will focus on one of Reboli’s unique honors: his inclusion in an exhibit at the White House.

“Joe was a very modest guy, but I think he was really honored by this opportunity, and it was one of the highlights of his career,” said Lois Reboli, Joe’s wife of 14 years.

In 2000, the nation’s capital was preparing to mark the 200th anniversary of the White House. To celebrate, the White House Historical Association planned an art exhibit and companion calendar titled White House Impressions: The President’s House Through the Eye of the Artist. The association selected 14 well-respected artists to participate, with one artist representing each of the 13 original colonies and the District of Columbia. 

Among the chosen artists were Reboli, who represented New York for the month of March, as well as realist painter Ken Davies of Massachusetts, Reboli’s former professor at the Paier College of Art, representing February. 

The cover of the 2000 White House calendar.

The other artists were Domenic DiStefano (Pennsylvania, December 1999), Al Alexander (New Jersey, January 2000), Ray Ellis (Georgia, April 2000), John Barber (Virginia, May 2000), Marjorie Egee (Delaware, June 2000), Marilyn Caldwell (Connecticut, July 2000), Tom Freeman (Maryland, August 2000), West Fraser (South Carolina, September 2000), Richard Grosvenor (Rhode Island, October 2000), Carol Aronson-Shore (New Hampshire, November 2000) and Bob Timberlake (North Carolina, December 2000). Carlton Fletcher of the District of Columbia was granted the cover.

“We made the trip down to the White House in 1999, and the artists got to meet with Bill and Hillary Clinton. It was our first trip to the White House, and definitely impressive to us both,” Lois Reboli recalled. “Joe had been in the Army and he was a very patriotic person. A White House photographer walked around with each artist as they decided what they wanted their piece to be — the photographer was the only one allowed to take pictures. Then the artists took the photos home to work.”

Reboli was the only artist in the White House exhibit to choose a point of view from inside the building. His painting, “View from the Red Room,” looks outside to the South Portico with the Jefferson Memorial in the background. 

The Red Room has served a variety of purposes in different presidencies, from a music room to a meeting space, the backdrop for official photos and family dinners. First Lady Jackie Kennedy once said that the view from the Red Room was her favorite in the White House because it looked out on the American people. 

“When I saw this particular view, I loved the light on the South Portico with the landscape in the background,” Reboli wrote at the time about his choice. “The light’s reflection on the portico contrasted nicely with the dark interior of the room.”   

The painting from the Red Room will be on display at the Reboli Center, along with the White House calendar and original work from nine of the 14 artists featured in the 2000 exhibit, said Reboli Center secretary Colleen Hanson.

“This exhibit was a huge undertaking, and took a lot of detective work in some cases. Lois has been working on this exhibit for more than 8 months. It was a search for contacts with the artists of the calendar, communicating back and forth, and then finally getting the artwork. This was a rather complicated exhibit to put together because of the number of artists involved, the time span of an event that happened more than 20 years ago, and the fact that during those 20 years not everyone had stayed put and that deaths had occurred,” Hanson said. 

“We wanted to share the work the artists did for the White House as well as some of their original work to give a greater sense of who they were and their artistic interests.”

The White House Calendar exhibit will be on display from Nov. 1 through Jan. 26, 2020 at the Reboli Center for Art and History, 64 Main St., Stony Brook. Participating artists include Al Alexander, Carol Aronson-Shore, Marilyn Caldwell, Ken Davies, Domenic DiStefano, Ray Ellis, West Fraser, Richard Grosvenor and the late Joe Reboli. For more information, call 631- 751-7707 or visit www.rebolicenter.org.