Weather

METRO photo

On Friday, April 5, a 4.8 magnitude earthquake hit north-central New Jersey and was reported as having been felt across the tri-state area — including across our communities. An earthquake of this magnitude has not hit the East Coast since 2011, when a 5.8 magnitude earthquake centered in Virginia shook areas across New York. 

Experiencing an earthquake can be a disorienting and unnerving event, as it involves the sudden movement of the Earth’s surface caused by the release of energy in the Earth’s crust. 

For those who have experienced an earthquake, the sensation is often described as a sudden jolt or shaking, sometimes accompanied by a rumbling sound. Initially, there may be a feeling of confusion or disbelief as the ground begins to move unexpectedly.

As the earthquake progresses, the intensity of the shaking can vary, ranging from mild tremors to violent jolts. Buildings and structures may sway or vibrate, causing objects to rattle and shift. The ground itself may undulate or roll, creating a sensation akin to being on a boat or riding a wave.

During a seismic event, individuals may feel a range of physical sensations, including dizziness, nausea or difficulty maintaining balance. It’s not uncommon for people to experience heightened anxiety or fear, especially if they are unfamiliar with earthquakes or if the shaking persists for an extended period.

In some cases, the intensity of the earthquake may be strong enough to cause damage to buildings and infrastructure, leading to collapsed structures, fallen debris and potential hazards such as ruptured gas lines or downed power lines.

It’s important to note that each earthquake is unique, and the experience can vary widely depending on factors such as proximity to the epicenter, building construction and personal resilience. Regardless of the magnitude or duration of the earthquake, it’s essential to remain calm, take protective action and follow established safety procedures to minimize the risk of injury and ensure personal safety.

Be prepared in the event of an earthquake

If you’re indoors, move away from windows, glass doors and exterior walls to avoid injury from shattered glass or falling objects. 

If you’re outdoors, move to an open area away from buildings, trees, streetlights and utility wires. Drop to the ground and cover your head and neck with your arms until the shaking subsides.

Be mindful of potential hazards such as tall furniture, bookcases and heavy objects that could topple over during an earthquake. 

Identify safe zones within your home or workplace, such as sturdy doorframes or interior walls, where you can seek shelter. 

Prepare an emergency kit with essential supplies, including water, nonperishable food, first-aid supplies, flashlights, batteries, a battery-powered radio and a whistle. 

Establish a communication plan with your household members or neighbors to coordinate actions during an earthquake or other emergencies. 

Be aware of potential aftereffects of an earthquake, such as aftershocks, structural damage, gas leaks and electrical hazards. If you suspect damage to your home or utilities, evacuate immediately and contact emergency services for assistance.

Stay informed about earthquake risks and preparedness measures in your area. Monitor local news, weather alerts and emergency notifications for updates on seismic activity and safety recommendations.

PSEG Facebook

After last week’s wet and windy weather, PSEG Long Island is once again prepared for a cold front and low pressure system that is forecasted to bring gusty winds, heavy rain and a few thunderstorms throughout the service area Thursday night through Friday.

The weather system could bring rainfalls of up to 1.5 inches in certain areas, along with peak wind gusts of 45-55 mph across the service area — enough to potentially topple trees, bring down branches on wires and cause outages.

PSEG Long Island has personnel ready to respond safely and as quickly as possible throughout the storm.

“PSEG Long Island is closely monitoring this latest weather front and we are once again prepared for potential impacts on the system,” said Michael Sullivan, vice president of Electric Operations at PSEG Long Island. “We have performed system and logistic checks, and have a full complement of personnel who will mobilize for restoration in foul weather conditions. Our crews will work to safely restore any outages as quickly as conditions will allow.”

Customers are asked to note the important storm safety tips below and to visit psegliny.com/safetyandreliability/stormsafety for additional storm preparation information.

Customer Safety:

  • Downed wires should always be considered “live.” Please stay as far away as possible from them, and do not drive over or stand near them. To report a downed wire, call PSEG Long Island’s 24-hour Electric Service number at 800-490-0075 or call 911.
  • Electric current passes easily through water. If you encounter a pool of standing water, stop, back up and choose another path.
  • Never use a generator or any gasoline-powered engine inside your home, basement, or garage or less than 20 feet from any window, door, or vent. Use an extension cord that is more than 20 feet long to keep the generator at a safe distance.

Stay connected:

  • Report an outage and receive status updates by texting OUT to PSEGLI (773454). You can also report your outage through our app or our website at psegliny.com/outages.
  • To report an outage or downed wire, you can also call PSEG Long Island’s 24-hour Electric Service number at 800-490-0075.
  • Follow PSEG Long Island on Facebook and X (formerly Twitter) to report an outage and for updates before, during and after the storm.
  • Visit PSEG Long Island’s MyPower map for the latest in outage info, restoration times and crew locations across Long Island and the Rockaways at mypowermap.psegliny.com/.

PSEG Facebook

PSEG Long Island is prepared for a storm that is forecasted to bring gusty winds and rain throughout its service area Wednesday morning into Thursday.

The weather system could bring rainfall of more than half an inch in certain areas, along with peak wind gusts of 40-60 mph across the service area — enough to potentially topple trees, bring down branches on wires and cause outages.

PSEG Long Island has personnel ready to respond safely and as quickly as possible throughout the storm.

“PSEG Long Island is closely monitoring this latest weather front and we are prepared for potential impacts on the system,” said Michael Sullivan, vice president of Electric Operations at PSEG Long Island. “We have performed system and logistic checks, and have a full complement of personnel who will mobilize for restoration in foul weather conditions. Our crews will work to safely restore any outages as quickly as conditions will allow.”

Customers are asked to note the important storm safety tips below and to visit psegliny.com/safetyandreliability/stormsafety for additional storm preparation information.

Customer Safety:

  • Downed wires should always be considered “live.” Stay as far away as possible from them, and if possible keep others, children, and pets away from the wire. Do not drive over or stand near any downed wire. To report a downed wire, call PSEG Long Island’s 24-hour Electric Service number at 800-490-0075 or call 911.
  • Electric current passes easily through water. If you encounter a pool of standing water, stop, back up and choose another path.
  • Never use a generator or any gasoline-powered engine inside your home, basement, or garage or less than 20 feet from any window, door, or vent. Use an extension cord that is more than 20 feet long to keep the generator at a safe distance. 

Stay connected:

  • Report an outage and receive status updates by texting OUT to PSEGLI (773454). You can also report your outage through our app or our website at psegliny.com/outages.
  • To report an outage or downed wire, you can also call PSEG Long Island’s 24-hour Electric Service number at 800-490-0075.
  • Follow PSEG Long Island on Facebook and X (formerly Twitter) to report an outage and for updates before, during and after the storm.
  • Visit PSEG Long Island’s MyPower map for the latest in outage info, restoration times and crew locations across Long Island and the Rockaways at mypowermap.psegliny.com/.

Bill Murray and Angela Paton in a scene from 'Groundhog Day.'

By Daniel Dunaief

Daniel Dunaief

Yes, I borrowed the headline from the movie “Groundhog Day,” as Bill Murray’s Phil Connors, discusses the weather with Angela Paton’s Mrs. Lancaster in his hotel in the morning.

Weather has always been a potential safe and easy topic when bumping into a neighbor we don’t know well, meeting the parents of a boyfriend or girlfriend, or breaking uncomfortable silences in, say, the office of the school principal or the boss.

These days, however, weather discussions seem to have changed.

Some of that, whether you believe in or are concerned about global warming or not, reflects the reality of several consecutive mild winters.

We have become so accustomed to milder conditions that a sudden drop in temperature or the forecast for a few inches of snow becomes conspicuous, causing us to reach for our heaviest coats, gloves and hats, and to urge others to “stay warm,” even as newscasts often lead their programs with predictions of “as much as four inches of snow.” Heaven forbid!

Back in the day — okay, I wrote it and those words are like nails on a chalkboard (teenagers may need to look up what a chalkboard is) to the younger version of myself — we had long stretches of time when the temperature fell below freezing, or even below 20. We also had real snow days and not these virtual classes amid storms. Not a fan! Let the kids make snowmen and sled down the hills.

Sure, we get periodic bouts of colder weather, but they don’t seem to last as long.

This has lowered the bar and our tolerance for temperatures that threaten to dry out our skin, make our hands numb and freeze our exposed earlobes.

Even, however, when the weather remains mild for long periods of time and we don’t need to talk about something to fill awkward silences, weather has remained a topic of conversation. Why, for example, does a place like San Diego, which has relatively stable weather day after day, need a weather report? They could just run the same graphic each day, with an occasional break to signal a change. 

Weather, however, reminds us that we’re alive and we get to experience some of the conditions of today. Each day’s weather brings a unique backdrop against which we face possibilities, opportunities, and challenges. Two straight days of weather with the same temperature, dew point, humidity and barometric pressure challenge us to find unique parts of the day, as the changing cloud cover or a slight wind acts like unique whirls in the fingerprints of a day. We might be walking down the street when a subtle shift in the weather helps our brain consider a problem from a new perspective. And, even when the weather doesn’t lend a hand, it helps define the moment.

The way the soft early morning light casts a glow on the bare branches at the top of a tree, while the bottom of the tree awaits in flatter light, allows us to celebrate the gift of our senses.

Movie directors use weather not only to create a backdrop or to establish a man-versus-nature themed challenge, but also to reflect the mood of the moment. 

As a main character grapples with the worst of his shortcomings, he may trudge through a rainstorm. When the clouds slowly part, he can reach an epiphany that helps him become a better version of himself.

The weather, with its unpredictable elements and the effect they have on everything in their path, helps us experience the same trees, the same grass, the same car across the street in a different way. A column of light beaming through clouds can offer ephemeral inspiration.

The weather can be an antagonist or a companion, an enabler or a disruptor, and a headwind or a tailwind in our lives.

Then again, it’s also a safe topic when our potential future father-in-law asks us one of many possible questions we’d rather not answer truthfully, if at all. 

At that point, weather becomes a safe topic for chitchat.

By Samantha Rutt

Residents woke up to a winter wonderland on Feb. 13, as a snowstorm brought several inches of snow to the area. The storm, which began in the early hours of the morning and continued into the afternoon, leaving a picturesque scene across towns and villages along the North Shore.

Reports from local meteorologists indicated that the snowfall ranged from 4 to 6 inches in most areas, with some isolated spots receiving up to 8 inches. Strong winds accompanying the storm also led to drifting snow in certain areas, creating challenging conditions for morning commuters.

As a result of the inclement weather, several school districts in the region announced closures for the day, ensuring the safety of students and staff. Additionally, transportation authorities advised residents to exercise caution while traveling, as roadways and sidewalks were coated with snow and ice.

As the snow gradually tapered off throughout the day, municipal crews and private contractors worked diligently to clear roads and sidewalks, ensuring that normalcy could resume as soon as possible. 

Stony Brook University: Entrance sign

By Daniel Dunaief

In anticipation of a nor’easter on Tuesday, Feb, 13 that has triggered a National Weather Service Winter Storm Warning, Stony Brook University announced that it was canceling classes and events scheduled for Tuesday.

The canceled classes and events apply to the Stony Brook main campus, SB Southampton and SB Manhattan campuses and includes the School of Medicine, School of Nursing, School of Health Professions, School of Social Welfare, and the Dental School.

In a note from Jason Casale, Director of Emergency Management, Stony Brook urged students with clinical obligations to make every effort to attend rotations and contact their clinical coordinators with questions or concerns.

During emergencies, non-essential employees can request supervisory approval to charge their accruals when offices are open, according to the campus e-mail blast. Essential employees have to report to work according to their scheduled hours.

University Hospital and the Long Island State Veterans Home employees are considered “essential” and are expected to work according to their regular schedule.

Brookhaven National Laboratory is also closed to everyone but essential personnel from 6 a.m. Tuesday to 6 a.m. Wednesday.

Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory, meanwhile, announced it is closing on Tuesday until 5 pm.

As of Monday evening, the National Weather Service issued a winter storm warning, predicting Suffolk County could receive snow accumulations of 5 inches to 10 inches and wind gusts of 40 miles per hour.

GHOST FERRY

Elisa Hendrey of Sound Beach captured this image of the Grand Republic Ferry engulfed in a thick fog at Port Jefferson Harbor on January 25, a result of the unusually warm air temperature of 57 degrees reacting to the colder water

Send your Photo of the Week to [email protected]

 

Pixabay photo

By Samantha Rutt

On Monday night, our communities experienced their first snowfall in an astonishing 716 days as a winter storm swept through the region, leaving a picturesque blanket of snow in its wake. The last significant snowfall in the area occurred on a winter day in 2022, making this recent event a long-awaited and nostalgic experience for residents.

The snowstorm, which arrived overnight, surprised many with its intensity and the amount of snow it deposited. Weather reports indicate that Suffolk County received approximately 3 inches of snow, transforming the landscape into a winter wonderland. The delicate white flakes clung to trees and rooftops, creating scenes reminiscent of a holiday postcard.

Local authorities were well prepared for the snowstorm, deploying salt trucks and snowplows to keep roads clear and safe for travel. Despite the challenges posed by the sudden onset of winter weather, no major disruptions were reported, and residents were able to navigate the snow-covered streets with caution. The most prominent concern locals are faced with lays within the morning commute as freezing temperatures and wet roads are prime ingredients for a dangerous trek. 

Meteorologists suggest that the unusual gap between snowfalls in Suffolk County could be attributed to a combination of climatic factors. The return of the snow, albeit a moderate amount, serves as a reminder of the region’s seasonal diversity and the unpredictable nature of weather patterns.

As the sun rises over Suffolk County, the pristine snowscape offers a serene and scenic view, marking the end of a lengthy snow drought for the community. 

Photo from PSEG Long Island Facebook

PSEG Long Island is prepared for the third storm to hit the service area in seven days, with gusty winds and heavy rain forecasted for Friday evening, Jan. 12 into Saturday,  Jan. 13.

The weather system could bring rainfalls of nearly 2 inches in certain areas, along with peak wind gusts of 42-58 mph across the service area — enough to potentially topple trees, bring down branches on wires and cause outages.

PSEG Long Island has personnel ready to respond safely and as quickly as possible throughout the storm. Additionally, approximately 160 off-Island utility personnel are being procured to work alongside PSEG Long Island’s highly trained crews.

“PSEG Long Island is closely monitoring the third weather front to approach our area in a week, and we are once again prepared for potential impacts on the system,” said Michael Sullivan, vice president of Electric Operations at PSEG Long Island. “We have performed system and logistic checks, and have a full complement of personnel who will mobilize for restoration in stormy weather conditions. Our crews will work to safely restore any outages as conditions will allow.”

Is your home prepared to withstand forecasted wind gusts?
Here are some tips:
– Collect and store loose outdoor items, including patio furniture, garbage cans, sports equipment or decorations.
– Find a safe location for your vehicle. Park away from trees, streetlamps and power lines. If possible, park in a garage.
– Secure fencing, porches, canopies and sheds, shutters and loose gutters on your property.
– Make sure all doors and windows are closed and locked securely.

Customers are asked to note the important storm safety tips below and to visit psegliny.com/safetyandreliability/stormsafety for additional storm preparation information.

Customer Safety:

  • Downed wires should always be considered “live.” Please stay as far away as possible from them, and do not drive over or stand near them. To report a downed wire, call PSEG Long Island’s 24-hour Electric Service number at 800-490-0075 or call 911.
  • Electric current passes easily through water. If you encounter a pool of standing water, stop, back up and choose another path.
  • Never use a generator or any gasoline-powered engine inside your home, basement, or garage or less than 20 feet from any window, door, or vent. Use an extension cord that is more than 20 feet long to keep the generator at a safe distance.

Stay connected:

  • Report an outage and receive status updates by texting OUT to PSEGLI (773454). You can also report your outage through our app or our website at psegliny.com/outages.
  • To report an outage or downed wire, you can also call PSEG Long Island’s 24-hour Electric Service number at 800-490-0075.
  • Follow PSEG Long Island on Facebook and X (formerly Twitter) to report an outage and for updates before, during and after the storm.
  • Visit PSEG Long Island’s MyPower map for the latest in outage info, restoration times and crew locations across Long Island and the Rockaways at mypowermap.psegliny.com/.

PSEG Facebook photo

After last weekend’s wintry weather, PSEG Long Island is once again prepared for another storm that is forecasted to bring gusty winds and heavy rain throughout its service area Tuesday evening into Wednesday morning.

The weather system could bring rainfalls of more than 2 inches in certain areas, along with peak wind gusts of 60-75 mph across the service area — enough to potentially topple trees, bring down branches on wires and cause outages.

PSEG Long Island has personnel ready to respond safely and as quickly as possible throughout the storm. Additionally, more than 350 off-Island utility personnel are being procured to work alongside PSEG Long Island’s highly trained crews.

“PSEG Long Island is closely monitoring this latest weather front and we are once again prepared for potential impacts on the system,” said Michael Sullivan, vice president of Electric Operations at PSEG Long Island. “We have performed system and logistic checks, and have a full complement of personnel who will mobilize for restoration in foul weather conditions. Our crews will work to safely restore any outages as quickly as conditions will allow.”

Customers are asked to note the important storm safety tips below and to visit psegliny.com/safetyandreliability/stormsafety for additional storm preparation information.

Customer Safety:

  • Downed wires should always be considered “live.” Please stay as far away as possible from them, and do not drive over or stand near them. To report a downed wire, call PSEG Long Island’s 24-hour Electric Service number at 800-490-0075 or call 911.
  • Electric current passes easily through water. If you encounter a pool of standing water, stop, back up and choose another path.
  • Never use a generator or any gasoline-powered engine inside your home, basement, or garage or less than 20 feet from any window, door, or vent. Use an extension cord that is more than 20 feet long to keep the generator at a safe distance.

Stay connected:

  • Report an outage and receive status updates by texting OUT to PSEGLI (773454). You can also report your outage through our app or our website at psegliny.com/outages.
  • To report an outage or downed wire, you can also call PSEG Long Island’s 24-hour Electric Service number at 800-490-0075.
  • Follow PSEG Long Island on Facebook and X (formerly Twitter) to report an outage and for updates before, during and after the storm.
  • Visit PSEG Long Island’s MyPower map for the latest in outage info, restoration times and crew locations across Long Island and the Rockaways at mypowermap.psegliny.com/.

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PSEG Long Island

PSEG Long Island operates the Long Island Power Authority’s transmission and distribution system under a long-term contract. PSEG Long Island is a subsidiary of Public Service Enterprise Group Inc. (PSEG) (NYSE:PEG), a publicly traded diversified energy company.