Tags Posts tagged with "Shoreham-Wading River High School"

Shoreham-Wading River High School

by -
0 87
Photo from SWRSD

Graduating from Shoreham-Wading River High School, Mika Misawa will be leaving with the honor of being named valedictorian and a 103.7 weighted GPA. 

She will be part of the incoming freshman class at Cornell University’s College of Arts and Sciences this fall. 

As a member of the varsity girls tennis team, Journalism Club, President of the Global Awareness club, editor-in-chief of the Global Awareness Club’s monthly newsletter, co-president of Women in Science and Engineering, Mathletes and the Tri-M Music honor society, Mika has always had an immense involvement in her school and community.

In her high school career, Mika took 13 AP courses, four honors courses and a college level course through Stony Brook University. 

Photo from SWRSD

As a brilliant mathematics student, Mika was also named a Long Island Young Scholar of Mathematics by the Institute of Creative Problem Solving for Gifted and Talented Students.

Her enthusiasm for succeeding in school translated into her music career as well, as she was selected for the National Association for Music Education All-Eastern Honors Ensemble Orchestra and the New York State School Music Association All-State Festival. 

Alongside Mika, valedictorian Owen Beran will be graduating also with a weighted GPA of 103.7.

As the team captain of the golf team and a member of the lacrosse team, Owen was able to be successful in all realms of his high school career. He has taken nine AP courses, four honors courses, and is the vice president of the National Honor Society.

However, his involvement doesn’t stop there. He was also the class of 2021 treasurer and a member of the Mathletes, Natural Helpers, the Robotics Club and the Student Advisory group. 

Not only was Owen heavily involved with his school, but his community as well. His community involvement includes volunteering for St. John’s Church Gathering Inn, Thomas Cutinella Memorial Patriot Run, Lax Out Cancer, Spirit’s Promise Equine Rescue, and Nexus-Animal Outreach.

With a passion for helping his community and furthering himself academically, Owen plans to attend the United States Naval Academy, where he will be majoring in nuclear engineering. 

Daniel Julian has been named salutatorian, graduating with a weighted GPA of 103.4. 

Photo from SWRSD

Discovering his passion for science and mathematics in tenth grade after taking an AP chemistry course, Daniel knew Stony Brook University’s STEM program would be his first-choice college.

“I chose chemistry as my major as a result of my love and ability for the subject and my love for science and mathematics as a whole,” he said. 

In the near future, Julian aspires to become an educator or researcher in the field of nuclear science and plans on pursuing graduate work in the sciences or science education. 

Additionally, the high school gave Daniel an opportunity to pursue his other passion, music. As a skilled jazz player, Julian played in the high school instrumental jazz ensemble in grades 9-12 for SCMEA All-County.

He was also selected as the baritone sax player and an alternate alto sax player with the NYSSMA All-State Instrumental Jazz Ensemble.

“For me, school concerts and other musical performances were special to me as playing in the Shoreham-Wading River High School’s bands gave me opportunities to contribute to my community through music and express myself artistically,” Daniel said. 

Photo from SWRSD

Some of his special experiences At Shoreham-Wading River included working on a research project involving epigenetics with one of his most influential AP biology teachers, Dr. Neff. 

Looking forward to his fall semester in Stony Brook to study chemistry, he is excited to focus on the subjects he is most passionate about on a more advanced level. 

“I enjoyed my time in high school taking multiple classes in various subjects, but I am looking forward to having a more specific focus on math and science as they are where my passion lies,” Daniel said.

Shoreham-Wading River dropped their season opener at home Feb. 11 against Center Moriches falling to the Red Devils by 7 points. 

The Wildcats dusted themselves off and went on a 7-game winning streak that included a semi-final 64-54 victory over Mattituck the day before only to face Center Moriches in the Conference IV finals Feb. 28. Hungry to avenge that season opening loss the Wildcats stayed withing striking distance through 8 minutes of play when the Red Devils stood on the gas and never looked back, to win it 76-61.

The Wildcat seniors led the way from the opening tip off with Joey Dwyer hitting 8 field goals 2 triples and 3 from the line to lead his team with 25 points. Co-Captains Thomas Bell nailed 10 from the floor along with a pair of free throws for 22 and Tristan Costello netted 9.

The Wildcats concluded their abbreviated season at 6-2 for 2nd place in League-VII, 7-2 overall.  Photos by Bill Landon 

Shoreham-Wading River sophomore GraceAnn Leonard drives the lane against Wyandanch in a League VII matchup Feb. 24. Photo by Bill Landon

Shoreham-Wading River punched their playoff ticket with a 67-49 victory against Wyandanch at home led by Sophomore GraceAnn Leonard who topped the scoring chart for the Wildcats in the League VII matchup Feb. 24. 

The win lifts the Wildcats to 3-0 to conclude regular season play in the age of COVID-19, where Leonard had 13 field goals three triples and a free throw for a team high 36 points. 

Colleen Ohrtman followed with 14 points with Annie Sheehan and Mia Rosati netting 8 and 5 points respectively.

Photos by Bill Landon 

Legislator Sarah Anker, left with scarf, presents a proclamation to Rubin alongside his parents and older brother Dec. 18. Photo by Julianne Mosher

Long Island’s very own Carter Rubin is back home and was greeted with a parade in his honor.

The 15-year-old winner of NBC’s “The Voice” was welcomed home Friday with a caravan of people supporting and cheering on the newest local celebrity.

Carter, of Shoreham, won the national singing competition during Tuesday’s series finale, as a representative of Team Gwen, headed by singer Gwen Stefani. 

On Dec. 18, several dozen cars lined up outside Shoreham-Wading River High School with signs and balloons, ready to surprise the sophomore outside his home. 

Also greeted by media, as Carter hosted interviews alongside his family, firetrucks, the local police and community members shocked the young singer with a warm welcoming. They held signs out of their car windows, handed him balloons and flowers, and yelled their joy for achieving a huge feat.

“I’m still in shock, I don’t think it really hit me yet,” the ecstatic and overwhelmed Carter said. “My feet have not touched the ground. I’m still trying to comprehend what happened.”

Since October, the young singer was traveling back and forth from his Shoreham home to Los Angeles to participate on the show. During the initial audition, Stefani and fellow judge singer John Legend both wanted the then-14-year-old on their teams. He chose the No Doubt singer, making this her first win on the show. 

After touching the hearts of both the judges and America as a whole, Carter is now able to share what he loves with the world, his mother, Alonna Rubin said. 

“It’s pretty awesome,” she said. “We’re so happy to be able to see him do what he loves and make so many people happy.”

Throughout the competition, he often dedicated his performances to his autistic older brother, Jack, who was back home watching his little brother shine on the small screen.

“I’m just so happy for Carter that he won ‘The Voice,’” he said, smiling. “It felt so good to see him on TV.”

Their mother is an advocate for the autism community and is founder of the local nonprofit Families in Arms, which helps support families of children on the spectrum.

The father said it was hard having his son and wife across the country, but FaceTime helped, and even the distance was well worth it to watch Carter shine.

“Watching him just do the work, perform and step up was amazing,” David Rubin said. “But he really made a big impact on people which is, as his parents, really incredible.”

Along with his new title as the show’s Season 19 winner, he also was awarded $100,000, a trip to Universal Orlando and a contract with Republic Records. Carter added that his next steps are to start writing his own music and start performing when COVID is done. 

“I want to get in the studio and record music to put out there for everyone,” he said. “Once COVID is over, I want to perform.”

He’s been performing for years, though, his grandfather Ric Mango said. Mango, who was a member of 1960s group Jay & the Americans, said that Carter had opened up for him and his own band since he was 6 years old. 

“He’s a great kid,” the proud grandfather said. “He’s great inside and out, and he’s going to be an idol.”

When Carter and his mother headed home Thursday night, family friend and Shoreham Civic Organization president, Mike Goralski, knew he wanted to do something special for the teen.

“I’ve been friends with the family for a little more than 12 years, and I felt as though something should be done because he’s a wonderful kid,” he said. “The family, from the kids to the grandparents, are
great people.”

So Goralski recruited local elected officials and the rest of the community to give Carter a big hello.

Suffolk County Legislator Sarah Anker (D-Mount Sinai) presented “The Voice” champion with a proclamation to congratulate him on his achievement. 

“This is the best holiday gift ever,” Anker said. “We really need this, and Carter is the perfect person to provide this excitement. His heart is so warm, his courage is so strong, and his belief that you can follow your dreams has made such a difference, not just for him, but for everyone.”

And while his personality shined on stage, he was still in disbelief he won this honor and received all this love from his neighbors.

“It feels amazing,” he said. “I’m just so grateful for all the outpouring support in the middle of a global pandemic.”

by -
0 626
SWRHS junior Jake Field and Alisa McMorris and John McMorris, parents of Andrew McMorris. Photo from SWRCSD

Shoreham-Wading River High School junior Jake Field conceived of a thoughtful school community addition for his Eagle Scout service project to mark his final rank in the Boy Scouts. Jake designed and built two benches to honor the memory of former student Andrew McMorris. His passionate project included a plaque that incorporated Andrew’s love of art, music, scouting and aviation. The benches were placed at Albert G. Prodell Middle School, where Andrew was a student.

Field said his project was a lot of work but he found it quite worth it. Field’s ability to plan, develop and organize the donation of the benches with Prodell Principal Kevin Vann and Superintendent Gerard Poole point to the leadership skills he obtained in his years as a Boy Scout. Once the district’s building and grounds crew prepped the location at the school, Field and his family met with Alisa McMorris and John McMorris to place the benches that will serve as a place for gentle contemplation in perpetuity.

by -
0 749
Shoreham-Wading River High School is located at 250A Route 25A in Shoreham. File photo by Kevin Redding

*Update* The Shoreham-Wading River school district announced it was closing the high school through Nov. 11, and planned to reopen Thursday Nov. 12.

Shoreham-Wading River school district officials have quarantined 110 students plus eight staff members after two students were tested positive for COVID-19. Officials said those positive tests came after a recent get-together among students.

SWR Superintendent Gerard Poole released a letter to parents Thursday, Oct. 29 informing them that the three students “all attended a weekend social gathering of students.” The district was notified about the positive tests Wednesday night.

Officials closed the high school, and later that day announced the building would also be closed Friday, Oct. 30. The school will continue learning using online distance learning, and students are required to log into their teacher’s Google Classroom at the start of each period to join the class and click on the Google Meet code.  The schedule can be found in the Distance Learning plan which is posted in the Re-Opening section of the District webpage. 

“What students do over the weekend and after school matters,” Poole wrote in his letter to parents. “As we have found out, it impacts our ability to remain open daily for all students.”

The district worked with the Suffolk County Department of Health to conduct contact tracing. Any student that has tested positive is currently under quarantine as well as their family members, which would include school age children as well.

With the additions of the 118 quarantined, the district said there are now a full 125 students and staff members asked to isolate themselves. The New York State School Report Card, which tracks the number of positive cases in districts, reads there have been a total of five positive tests in the district since it opened in September.

Students who tested positive are not allowed to return to school until the DOH gives the go-ahead, Pooles letter stated.

“With the Halloween weekend approaching, children may need an additional reminder about the importance of implementing COVID-19 health precautions at all times and the importance of avoiding large social gatherings,” the superintendent said in his letter. “In order for our schools to remain open and for the health of all students, it is my hope that any large social gatherings that may have been planned for the upcoming weekend are canceled.”

 

by -
0 981
File photo

Suffolk County Police said they arrested a Yaphank man Friday, Sept. 25 for allegedly stealing items from 13 unlocked vehicles in Shoreham and Wading River during the past month.

For several weeks, residents in the SWR community have complained about an alleged individual stealing items from people’s unlocked cars. A man in a hat and mask was seen in several residents’ security cameras walking up to cars late at night and trying their locks.

During the course of the investigation into larcenies from vehicles since Aug. 30, police said 7th precinct officer Karen Grenia observed the alleged suspect, Patrick Fontaine, 38, in the vicinity of Route 25A at around 7:50 a.m. Fontaine was apprehended a short time later on the grounds of Shoreham-Wading River High School.

Fontaine has previously been arrested in 2015 for a string of robberies in Yaphank.

7th precinct officers, who were assisted by canine section officers, charged Fontaine with 13 counts of petite larceny for stealing items from vehicles at the following locations:

  • Circle Drive in Shoreham on Aug. 30.
  • Circle Drive in Shoreham on Aug. 31.
  • Jomar Road in Shoreham on Sept. 13.
  • Reynolds Road in Shoreham on Sept. 18.
  • Frederick Drive in Shoreham on Sept. 18.
  • John Street in Shoreham between Sept. 18 and Sept. 19.
  • Royal Way in Shoreham on Sept. 19.
  • John Street in Shoreham on Sept. 19.
  • Knight Street in Shoreham on Sept. 19.
  • Zophar Mills Road in East Shoreham between Sept. 20 and Sept. 21.
  • Randall Road in Wading River between Sept. 20 and Sept. 21.
  • Zophar Mills Road in East Shoreham on Sept. 21.
  • Thomas Drive in Wading River between Sept. 20 and Sept. 21.

Items allegedly stolen included money, electronics, identification and glasses. Fontaine was also charged with criminal possession of a controlled substance and a parole warrant. Police said he will be held overnight at the 7th precinct and is scheduled for arraignment at First District Court in Central Islip Sept. 26.

SWR 2020 Valedictorian Jacqueline Holden and Salutatorian Stephanie Searing. Photos from SWRCSD

Shoreham-Wading River High School announced the top scoring seniors of the Class of 2020 with Jacqueline Holden and Stephanie Searing having been named valedictorian and salutatorian, respectively.

These two well-rounded students both have impressive achievements and interests and have taken advantage of many of the district’s courses and extracurricular activities.

Valedictorian Holden’s achievements include involvement with the Drama Club and Tri-M Music Honor Society, where she serves each club as treasurer; leadership roles as secretary for both Women in Science and Engineering and Students Against Destructive Decisions and varsity captain of Brainstormers. Outside of a busy high school career, she is a leader in St. Mark’s Teen Choir and a Girl Scout.

Holden will study molecular biology at the University of Pittsburgh in the fall. She, along with other valedictorians, were saluted by the Suffolk County School Superintendents Association this year in what would have been their 26th annual valedictorians luncheon, which was canceled due to the pandemic. Instead Superintendent Gerard Poole presented Holden with a commemorative program, congratulatory video, a certificate of achievement and a cherished childhood storybook, “Oh, the Places You’ll Go!” by Dr. Seuss.

Salutatorian Searing served as vice president of the National Honor Society’s Peer Tutoring, is treasurer of Tri-Music Honor Society, represented her peers as the ex-officio student member of the Shoreham-Wading River board of education, is a member of Mathletes, the varsity track team and the varsity tennis team. Searing is principal violist of the Children’s Orchestral Society and participated in the Plum Island Animal Disease Center High School STEM Forum, a unique opportunity where she presented her findings on the organ shortage in America to scientists from Plum Island, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory, University of Connecticut, Suffolk County Community College and Mystic Aquarium among others.

Searing will attend Stevens Institute of Technology where she will major in biomedical engineering.   

“These two students represent the exceptional programming offered at our high school,” Principal Frank Pugliese said. “Their leadership skills and well-rounded academic, athletic, extracurricular and community involvement exemplify the goals of the Shoreham-Wading River School District – providing all students the skills required to become lifelong learners in a self-sufficient manner. We look forward to hearing more about their accomplishments in the future.”

by -
0 1136
SWR student John Basile works on the Wildcat Pause 2020 senior issue. Photo from Jean Branna

It was months before the start of the crisis, and the editors of the Wildcat Pause school newspaper at Shoreham-Wading River High School were anticipating the school year’s end and the annual senior issue. Last year, printing troubles resulted in only a few copies getting published. This year was supposed to be different. 

‘I will miss the relationships I have created with teachers and peers. Some of us went to kindergarten together, so it’s not easy to recreate the same type of relationship.’

—Brianna Cohen

Quoted in SWR 2020 senior issue

Then the pandemic happened. The schools were closed. Students started learning at a distance online, and for the editors of the Pause, a new concern popped into their heads. What would happen to the senior issue, the one supposed to cap off both their and their fellow student’s final year?

“It became obvious that we needed to have it ready,” said high school journalism teacher Jean Branna. The newspaper is planned to be available online and will be printed in time to be handed out alongside the yearbook.

What became apparent to both the teacher and school newspaper editors was this senior issue, the last of their K-12 careers, would mark a defining moment for so many of their classmates. What they were experiencing was historic, a disruption to traditional schooling not seen in more than a century.

It was a marking point for a graduating class which editors said has become tight knit through adversity, such as the students who came together in the 2018 high school walkouts, protesting gun violence in schools after the Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School shooting in Parkland, Florida.

“The senior class is very close, we went through a lot of stuff in the past several years,” said Heather Tepper, co-editor-in-chief of the Pause. “To see the last three years taken away from a lot of people, you really see them react with deprivation and disappointment.”

Tepper, along with co-editor-in-chief Sasha Medvedeva, SWR senior John Basile and Branna have taken to the task of producing the senior issue come hell or high water.

Of course, nothing comes easy, especially in a crisis. The school newspaper crew is unable to use Adobe InDesign from home, as Branna said the program does not meet the data privacy and security requirements by state law. Instead, thanks to the technical expertise of Basile, the editors have started laying out using Google Docs. Normally just a tool for straight text formats, using tables and cells the students have learned to format the papers, despite limitations of the program.

The fact the students and teacher have had only three weeks to put together issue meant some long hours compiling pictures and senior comments, then laying everything out. Tepper said there was one night she logged on to see Branna was still working on a page at around 11:30 p.m. She told her teacher to “go get some sleep.”

Doing this project, she said, is as much for the students as it is to show appreciation for her teacher.

‘Be yourself and don’t sweat the small stuff. The years go by way too quickly to worry about the little things, and one day you’ll look back on those things and realize how stupid they were. Also, be yourself and never change for anyone because you’re happiest when you’re you.’

— Mike Casazza 

Quoted in SWR 2020 senior issue

“Branna is so invested with journalism in general, she’s so into her work, and I felt like I wanted to go out with a bang,” Tepper said.

But the hours have been worth it, as students from the journalism class take in the massive number of quotes from seniors. In previous years, when student-journalists would get comments from seniors wandering the halls, comments had been terse or simple platitudes. Now, while students are forced online, seniors became more verbose. To read some of their quotes is to understand the mindset of those graduating seniors, hurtling themselves into the many unknowns the pandemic has produced.

“I’ve learned about how their friendships, their experiences have changed with other people,” Medvedeva said. 

The senior was planning to attend Binghamton University to study neuroscience, but she still does not know if the college will even have a fall semester, or what shape it will take. Tepper was set to go to the Fashion Institute of Technology in Manhattan and study advertising with a goal of going into public relations. Similar to her fellow editor, she also does not know what the future may bring. It is possibly the most daunting and most uncertain time for a person to graduate since the 2008 financial collapse.

Though in writing the senior issue’s editorial, co-written by both editors, what became clear was just what this issue of the Wildcat Pause meant to the graduating students. Medvedeva in hearing some of the anecdotes from seniors has “learned about their friendships with other seniors, of how some experiences throughout their high school career have changed them. It has just warmed my heart to hear those.”

Tepper, who shared in her fellow seniors’ anxieties over the future, added this Pause issue may memorialize the shared experiences of her classmates.

“I still think there’s something to celebrate, as things were taken away from us,” she said. “I think that given the unfortunate circumstances, we can appreciate what we had even more.” 

by -
0 2272

Goals are hard to come by in soccer, and one was all it took for Shoreham-Wading River when 9thgrader Graceann Leonard crossed to junior Ashley Borriello who buried her shot minutes into the second half. John Glenn was unable to answer and the Wildcats won 1-0 Oct. 24 as they conclude their regular season at 11-1-2, one game behind Div. II leader Hills West.

The win bodes well for the Wildcats as they’ll play the opening round of the playoffs at home Oct. 29. Game time is set for 4 p.m.

This post was amended Oct. 28 to reflect new start times for the first playoff game for the wildcats.