Authors Posts by Heidi Sutton

Heidi Sutton

Heidi Sutton
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A red-tailed hawk at Sweetbriar. Photo by Talia Amorosano

Time to clean out your closets and help a noble cause! Sweetbriar Nature Center, located at 62 Eckernkamp Drive, Smithtown seeks donations for its annual spring Yard Sale for Wildlife fundraiser to be held in May. Antiques, collectibles, memorabilia and other “cool” stuff accepted. Please no clothes, books, baby supplies, electronics or anything that weighs over 40 pounds unless it fits the above guidelines. All funds raised will support the nature center’s mission of providing nature education and wildlife rehabilitation. To drop off items or to arrange a pick up, call Eric at 631-979-6344, ext. 302.

Fruit, like these Sumo Citrus, is a good source of fiber. Photo by Heidi Sutton
Modest lifestyle changes have a resounding effect

By David Dunaief, M.D.

Dr. David Dunaief

We can significantly reduce the occurrence of heart disease, the number one killer in the United States, by making modest lifestyle changes.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, there are 790,000 heart attacks annually and 210,000 of these occur in those who’ve already had a first heart attack (1). Here, I will provide specifics on how to make changes to protect you and your family from heart disease, regardless of family history.

The evidence continues to highlight lifestyle changes, including diet, as the most important factors in preventing heart disease. Changes that garner a big bang for your buck include the consumption of chocolate, legumes, nuts, fiber and omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs).

Chocolate effect

Chocolate lovers, this study is for you! Preliminary evidence shows that two pieces of chocolate a week may decrease the risk of a heart attack by 37 percent, compared to those who consume less (2). However, the authors warned against the idea that more is better. In fact, high fat and sugar content and calorically dense aspects may have detrimental effects when consumed at much higher levels. There is a fine line between potential benefit and harm. The benefits may be attributed to micronutrients referred to as flavonols.

I usually recommend that patients have one to two squares – about one-fifth to two-fifths of an ounce – of dark chocolate daily. Who says prevention has to be painful?

Role of fiber

Fiber has a dose-response relationship to reducing risk. In other words, the more fiber intake, the greater the reduction in risk. In a meta-analysis of 10 studies, results showed for every 10-gram increase in fiber, there was a corresponding 14 percent reduction in the risk of a cardiovascular event and a 27 percent reduction in the risk of heart disease mortality (3). The authors analyzed data that included over 90,000 men and 200,000 women.

The average American consumes about 16 grams per day of fiber (4). The Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics recommends 14 grams of fiber for each 1,000 calories consumed, or roughly 25 grams for women and 38 grams for men (5). Therefore, we can significantly reduce our risk of heart disease if we increase our consumption of fiber to reach the recommended levels. Good sources of fiber are whole grains and fruits.

Omega-3 fatty acids

In a study with over 45,000 men, there were significant reductions in coronary heart disease with omega-3 PUFAs. Both plant-based and seafood-based omega-3s showed these effects (7). Good sources of omega-3s from plant-based sources include nuts, such as walnuts, and ground flaxseed.

Your ultimate goal should be to become “heart attack proof,” a term used by Dr. Sanjay Gupta and reinforced by Dr. Dean Ornish. This requires a plant-based diet. The more significant the lifestyle modifications you make, the closer you will come to achieving this goal. But even modest changes in diet will result in significant reductions in risk.

Legumes’ impact

In a prospective (forward-looking) cohort study, the First National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey Epidemiologic Follow-up Study (NHEFS), legumes reduced the risk of coronary heart disease by a significant 22 percent. Those who consumed four or more servings per week, compared to those who consumed less than one serving, saw this effect. The legumes used in this study included beans, peas and peanuts (6). There were over 9,500 men and women involved, spanning 19 years of follow-up. I recommend that patients consume at least one to two servings a day, or 7 to 14 a week. Imagine the impact that would have, compared to the modest four servings per week used to reach statistical significance.

References:

(1) cdc.gov. (2) BMJ 2011; 343:d4488. (3) Arch Intern Med. 2004 Feb 23;164(4):370-376. (4) NHANES 2009-2010 Data Brief No. 12. Sep 2014. (5) eatright.org. (6) Arch Intern Med. 2001 Nov 26;161(21):2573-2578. (7) Circulation. 2005 Jan 18;111(2):157-164.

Dr. Dunaief is a speaker, author and local lifestyle medicine physician focusing on the integration of medicine, nutrition, fitness and stress management. For further information, visit www.medicalcompassmd.com or consult your personal physician.     

The Whole Foods in Lake Grove, above, will soon be joined by a second Suffolk County store. File photo

Suffolk County is getting a second Whole Foods Market in Commack. The new store, located at the site of the former King Kullen at 120 Veterans Memorial Highway, will hold a grand opening on April 3 at 9 a.m. with complimentary coffee and breakfast pastries offered at 8 a.m. Reusable canvas shopping bags will be handed out to the first 200 customers.

The market will be the fourth Whole Foods location on Long Island. The others are in Jericho, Manhasset and Lake Grove.

“We’re eager to open our doors to the Commack community,” said store team leader Lorraine Barker in a statement. “We look forward to providing our customers with a variety of products to meet all of their needs, while also offering the highest quality service and providing a neighborhood gathering space.”

According to a press release, the new 45,000-square-foot store will offer fresh produce, full-service butcher and seafood departments; an in-house bakery; a hot and cold prepared foods section; coffee and juice bars; beer from local producers; and 142 bins of bulk scoop items. It will also feature a fast-casual eatery that will serve wine and locally brewed beer on tap.

Owned by online retail giant Amazon, the Commack store will employ a total of 200 full- and part-time team members. Following the grand opening, store hours will be 8 a.m. to 10 p.m. daily. For more information, visit www.wholefoodsmarket.com.

Canta Libre Chamber Ensemble. Tracey Elizabeth Photography

The critically acclaimed Canta Libre Chamber Ensemble will perform a spring equinox concert in the Suffolk County Vanderbilt Museum’s Charles and Helen Reichert Planetarium on Saturday, March 23, from 6 to 7:30 p.m. The spring equinox repertoire includes music for septet: “Angels in Flight” by Marjan Mozetich; “Distant Light” by Joseph Russo; “Cherry Blossoms” by Gary Schocker; the world premiere of Abstract No. 1 by Joel Lambdin; and Maurice Ravel’s pivotal work, Introduction and Allegro. The performance will be accompanied by beautiful imagery on the planetarium dome. Tickets are $20 adults online at www.vanderbiltmuseum.org, $25 at the door; and $15 for children 15 and younger. The museum is located at 180 Little Neck Road, Centerport. Call 631-854-5799.

Carie Karavas

The Heritage Center, 633 Mount Sinai-Coram Road, Mount Sinai will showcase a Comedy Show and Dinner on Friday, March 22 at 7 p.m. Hosted by John Butera, the show will feature Carie Karavas, Keith Anthony and special guest, Fat Jay. $50 per person includes dinner, drinks (water, soda, beer and wine) and raffles. To order, visit www.msheritagetrust.org or call 631-509-0882.

Steven Fontana, left, is this year’s recipient of the R. Sherman Mills Young Historian Award. Photo by Anthony White

Tickets are still available for the Three Village Historical Society’s 42nd annual Awards Dinner to be held at the Three Village Inn, 150 Main St., Stony Brook on Wednesday, March 27 from 6 to 9 p.m. The event will honor local businesses, local residents, homeowners, society members and youth who have made significant contributions in helping to preserve the shared heritage within the Three Village area. Cash bar, raffles. $65 per person, $60 members includes a three-course dinner. To order, visit www.tvhs.org or call 631-751-3730.

‘Florence Sun and Shadows,’ oil on linen, by Tim McGuire will be on view at The Atelier at Flowerfield through May 2. Image courtesy of The Atelier

The Atelier at Flowerfield, 2 Flowerfield, Suite 15 in St. James recently unveiled its latest exhibit titled The Atelier Invitational: A Juried Show of Guest Artists at Atelier Hall. The show will be on view through May 2.

Enjoy the eclectic spirit of Long Island artists converging in one 2,000- square-foot gallery, bringing the rhythm of the shoreline, the character of loved ones, and the expression of a wide variety of genres to this show.

Featured artists include Rose Ann Albanese, Ross Barbera, Diane Bares, Nancy Bass, Mary Benedetto, Eleanor Berger, Robert Berson, Pam Best, Marlene Bezich, Al Candia, Kenneth Cerreta, Christine D’Addario, Kittie Davenport, Anthony Davis, Donna Deedy, Julie Doczi, Karen Farrell, Steve Forster, Neda Javanshir, Julia Jenkins, Larry Johnston, Edward Joseph, Patricia Lind-Gonzalez, Smadar Maduel, John Mansueto, Jane McGraw-Teubner, Timothy McGuire, Eleanor Meier, Fred Mendelsohn, Karen Meneghin, Matthew B. Moore, Rick Mundy, David Peikon, Lissette Resnick, Dave Rogers, Irene Ruddock, Oscar Santiago, Lisa Springer, Judy Stone, Angela Stratton, Susan Tango, Victor Vaccaro, Marjorie VandeStouwe and Laura Westlake.

The gallery is open Monday through Saturday from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Admission is free. For further information, please call 631-250-9009.

Join the Smithtown Historical Society at the Frank Brush Barn, 211 East Main St., Smithtown for an evening of Supermarket BINGO on Friday, March 22 at 7 p.m. This is not your grandmother’s BINGO! Come for the fun and leave with a bag or two of groceries. Entry fee of $15, $10 members, $5 kids 12 and under and includes two sets of game cards, daubers, snacks and refreshments. Additional cards are available at $1 each. Reservations are suggested. Call 631-265-6768.

The Middle Country Public Library, 101 Eastwood Blvd., Centereach will host a Job Fair by the Suffolk County One-Stop Employment Center on Wednesday, March 20 from 1 to 4 p.m.

Representatives from over 35 companies including Amneal Pharmaceuticals, Association for Mental Health & Wellness, DiCarlo Food Service, East/West Industries, Express Employment Pros, HW Staffing, Jefferson’s Ferry, LIRR, LI State Veterans Home, Manpower, Marcum Search, Precious Lambs Childcare, Presidio, Rise Life Services, South Shore Home Health, Splish Splash, Stop & Shop, Suffolk County Civil Service, SYSCO, Titan Global, Triangle Building Products, Wa  lmart, Well Life Network and Windowrama are scheduled to attend.

All are welcome and no registration is required. Bring copies of your resume and dress to impress! For more information, call 631-585-9393.

Photo from WMHO

BEST BAKER IN THE LAND

Congratulations to Priscilla Kirch of Hauppauge, the winner of the Ward Melville Heritage Organization’s first Irish Soda Bread competition. Held during the St. Patrick’s Day celebration at the WMHO’s Educational & Cultural Center in Stony Brook on March 3, the contest drew eight delicious entries. Above right, Kirch receives her prize, a $150 gift certificate to the shops and restaurants at the Stony Brook Village Center from Kristin Shea, the director of the Educational & Cultural Center.  

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