Tags Posts tagged with "Fireworks"

Fireworks

Fireworks in the Village of Asharoken on July 4. Photo by Steve Zaitz

Each year, we have the pleasure of covering the patriotism and camaraderie of our North Shore community.

While we love featuring fireworks and celebrations, it’s easy to get discouraged about the state of our nation. Yet, we are reminded each year to put it all in perspective. 

On a rainy Fourth of July, as families gathered for barbecues and the fireworks shot into the sky, it’s safe to say most of us could recognize that we are among the luckiest of people in history to have the freedoms and opportunities we have.

To love our country, and our community, is to fight for them both. The Founding Fathers envisioned an active, informed and passionate electorate. We encourage everyone who took Independence Day to reflect on their patriotism and gratitude for our service members, and to think about how we got this wonderful freedom born out of a grand experiment.

The Founders were passionate citizens, many of whom risked their lives to design a government they thought would bring freedom and prosperity to all. This bit of history, which we all shared this week on July Fourth, is one we should remember each day.

We, too, should think of ways to improve our government. In these divided times, most of us have plenty of opinions on this already, but maybe not in terms of realistic expectations and compromise.

We must think about issues and consider ways we can move the needle. Writing to our elected officials and contributing letters to the editor are ways to do that.

The Founders wanted us to participate in the political process. We should follow their example and speak up, while being civil and compromising as we work toward mutually agreeable solutions for all.

The spirit of freedom we celebrated this week can live on throughout the year. It’s up to all of us to continue to pursue efforts to maintain equity and justice for all Americans and all members of our communities. It’s up to us to ensure that all of us feel free.

Pixabay photo

The Suffolk County Volunteer Firefighters Burn Center at Stony Brook University Hospital — the only designated burn care facility in Suffolk County, has 10 Safety Tips this July 4th Weekend as families celebrate the holiday. 

Many will spend the holiday in their backyards for barbecues, cookouts or build fire pits where there’s a greater risk to sustain a burn injury. To avoid injury, Steven Sandoval, MD, Associate Professor of Surgery and Medical Director of the Suffolk County Volunteer Firefighters Burn Center at Stony Brook University Hospital, says “The best way to do this is to prevent the burn in the first place with safety tips and precautions to eliminate potential dangers.” 

  1. Fireworks are safe for viewing only when being used by professionals. 
  1. Sparklers are one of the most common ways children become burned this holiday, even with a parent’s supervision. 
  1. Do not have children around any fireworks, firepits, barbecues or hot coals. Teach them not to grab objects or play with items that can be hot. Go through a lesson where they learn to ask permission. 
  1. Limit the use of flammable liquids to start your fire pits and barbecues. Use only approved lighter fluids that are meant for cooking purposes. No gasoline or kerosene. 
  1. Don’t leave hot coals from fire pits and barbecues laying on the ground for people to step in. 
  1. When cleaning grills, the use of wire bristle brushes can result in ingestion of sharp bristle pieces requiring surgery. 
  1. If you are overly tired, and consumed alcohol, do not use the stovetop, fire pit or a fireplace. 
  1. Stay protected from the sun. Use hats and sunblock, and realize that sunblock needs to be reapplied after swimming or after sweating. 
  1. Use the back burners of the stove to prevent children from reaching up and touching hot pots and pans. 
  1. Always use oven mitts or potholders to remove hot items from the stove or microwave. Assume pots, pans and dishware are hot.  

“If burned do not go anywhere but a facility that specializes in burn treatment,” says Dr. Sandoval. 

As the only designated burn care facility for more than 1.5 million residents of Suffolk County, the Burn Center at Stony Brook University Hospital coordinates burn services throughout the county, and conducts training and research in burn care. The Burn Center also serves as a resource to neighboring community-based hospitals. Patients of all ages – from infants through geriatrics – are treated at the Burn Center. 

To reach the Suffolk County Volunteer Firefighters Burn Center at Stony Brook University Hospital, call 631-444-4545. 

For immediate help, call the burn unit directly at 631-444-BURN. 

Enjoy traditional Greek dancing on Saturday and Sunday evenings. File photo by Giselle Barkley/TBR News Media

By Heidi Sutton

Lovers of all things Greek will gather at the Greek Orthodox Church of the Assumption in Port Jefferson this week when the church presents its annual Greek Festival on Thursday, Aug. 25 from 5 to 10 p.m., Friday, Aug. 26 from 5 to 11 p.m., Saturday, Aug. 27 from noon to 11 p.m. and Sunday, Aug. 28 from noon to 10 p.m. 

Held rain or shine, the fun event will feature carnival rides, games, a variety of vendors, fireworks, church tours, live Greek music by Asteri Entertainment, dancing and of course, culinary delights.

Authentic mouth-watering foods such as gyros, tiropita (cheese pie), moussaka, souvlaki, and spanakopita (spinach pie) will be served up, along with sweet desserts such as galaktoboureko, koulourakia, baklava and loukoumades, a fried dough pastry favorite.

One of the main attractions at the festival is the over-the-top sweepstakes that the church holds. This year 170 prizes will be awarded from cars — a 2023 Mercedes Benz A-Class is first prize — to a boat, Apple Watch, iPad, cash, Smart TV and more. Tickets for the sweepstakes are $100 each and limited to 3,999 tickets. The drawing will be held on Aug. 28 at 8 p.m.

The event is also an opportunity to see traditional Greek dance performances by the Blue Point Hellenic Dancers on Saturday and the Greek School Dancers on Sunday. 

Fireworks will be held on Friday and Saturday nights at 9:30 p.m., weather permitting. Free shuttle buses will pick up attendees from Ward Melville High School, 380 Old Town Road, East Setauket to transport them to festival on Friday, Saturday and Sunday only. Parking is also available at BASF Corporation across the street from the church. Tickets are $2 per person; children under 12 can attend for free.

The Greek Orthodox Church of the Assumption is located at 430 Sheep Pasture Road in Port Jefferson. For more information, call the church office at 631-473-0894 or visit www.portjeffgreekfest.com.

by -
0 772
File photo

Suffolk County Police Second Squad detectives are investigating an incident during which a man was seriously injured by a firework in Commack on Aug. 20.

A 67-year-old Commack man was attending a block party and was in front of 5 Diellen Court when a mortar-style firework exploded and struck him in the face at approximately 10 p.m.

The man, whose name is being withheld pending notification of next of kin, was transported to Stony Brook University Hospital for treatment of serious, but non-life-threatening burns and lacerations to his face and head.

Detectives are asking anyone with knowledge of the incident to contact the Second Squad at 631-854-8252.

Pixabay photo

The Suffolk County Volunteer Firefighters Burn Center at Stony Brook University Hospital — the only designated burn care facility in Suffolk County, has 10 safety tips this July 4th.

Many will spend the holiday in their backyards for barbecues, cookouts or build fire pits where there’s a greater risk to sustain a burn injury. To avoid injury, Steven Sandoval, MD, Associate Professor of Surgery and Medical Director of the Suffolk County Volunteer Firefighters Burn Center at Stony Brook University Hospital, says “The best way to do this is to prevent the burn in the first place with safety tips and precautions to eliminate potential dangers.”

  1. Fireworks are safe for viewing only when being used by professionals.
  2. Sparklers are one of the most common ways children become burned this holiday, even with a parent’s supervision.
  3. Do not have children around any fireworks, firepits, barbecues or hot coals. Teach them not to grab objects or play with items that can be hot. Go through a lesson where they learn to ask permission.
  4. Limit the use of flammable liquids to start your fire pits and barbecues. Use only approved lighter fluids that are meant for cooking purposes. No gasoline or kerosene.
  5. Don’t leave hot coals from fire pits and barbecues laying on the ground for people to step in.
  6. When cleaning grills, the use of wire bristle brushes can result in ingestion of sharp bristle pieces requiring surgery.
  7. If you are overly tired, and consumed alcohol, do not use the stovetop, fire pit or a fireplace.
  8. Stay protected from the sun. Use hats and sunblock, and realize that sunblock needs to be reapplied after swimming or after sweating.
  9. Use the back burners of the stove to prevent children from reaching up and touching hot pots and pans.
  10. Always use oven mitts or potholders to remove hot items from the stove or microwave. Assume pots, pans and dishware are hot.

“If burned do not go anywhere but a facility that specializes in burn treatment,” says Dr. Sandoval.

As the only designated burn care facility for more than 1.5 million residents of Suffolk County, the Burn Center at Stony Brook University Hospital coordinates burn services throughout the county, and conducts training and research in burn care. The Burn Center also serves as a resource to neighboring community-based hospitals. Patients of all ages – from infants through geriatrics – are treated at the Burn Center.

To reach the Suffolk County Volunteer Firefighters Burn Center at Stony Brook University Hospital, call 631-444-4545.

For immediate help, call the burn unit directly at 631-444-BURN.

Media Origins captured the fireworks from the Village of Asharoken.

Fourth of July is a time meant to be spent with friends and family while barbecuing some of the best American meals.

It’s also the one holiday a year where lighting off fireworks from morning to night time is completely acceptable — even encouraged. 

This countrywide celebration of America may be enjoyable for most but for others, such as combat veterans and first responders suffering with post-traumatic stress disorder, it can be an extremely stressful day. And when fireworks are set off on other days, it can be even more unnerving for them and others. 

Is celebrating this national holiday at the cost of our own heroes? 

According to a National Health and Resilience in Veterans Study, 87% of veterans have been exposed to at least one potentially traumatic event and experience on average of 3.4 such events throughout their service. The National Institutes of Health also recorded that an estimate of 400,000 first responders in America have at least some symptoms of PTSD.

The degree of exposure varies from person to person, therefore affecting the magnitude of their illness.

The sounds of fireworks — loud, sudden and reminiscent of traumatic events — may trigger PTSD, making it difficult for some who experience symptoms to enjoy their holiday. Lighting off fireworks throughout the month or late at night could additionally put a veteran or first responder into a bad spot. 

Even weeks after the Fourth of July is over, sleeping troubles or nightmares may persist.  

Paws of War, located in Nesconset, rescues and trains shelter dogs to become service dogs for Long Island veterans and first responders. With the mental pressure of dealing with the holiday, a service dog can also serve as a calming aide to those coping through a PTSD episode.

One way to make sure a veteran doesn’t become triggered is to involve them in lighting the fireworks so the shock of hearing the fireworks won’t be unexpected. Many veterans choose to light fireworks for their family. 

There are many other ways to celebrate the Fourth of July and summer that don’t involve setting off fireworks. Fishing, boating, visiting historical parks, watching patriotic movies and barbecuing are just some of the alternate options that families can do together to celebrate. However, if you’re still itching for fireworks, sparklers are noise free and easy to bring anywhere you go.

So next Fourth of July, being sensitive to veterans and first responders could turn their nerve-racking holiday into a happy one. 

Residents prepare July Fourth at-home firework shows in Port Jefferson Station in 2018. Photo by Kyle Barr

For the past month or so, the sounds of fireworks have rang throughout the night in many parts of Long Island. Despite fireworks being banned in New York State for decades, Suffolk and Nassau officials have acknowledged seeing an increase in the number of complaints to police departments about illegal fireworks. 

The increase could be attributed to the lack of official Fourth of July firework display due to the coronavirus pandemic, or simply boredom. 

Suffolk County Executive Steve Bellone held a media briefing with Suffolk Police Chief Stuart Cameron prior to July 4 to warn residents about the dangers of using illegal fireworks. During the event, they showcased the dangers and destruction of fireworks by igniting a collection of pyrotechnics in a camper. 

This past holiday weekend there have been several firework injury incidents in Suffolk County. A man in Port Jefferson Station was injured when he attempted to light a firework that explored and injured one of his eyes. Additionally, a 29-year old man in Central Islip was severely wounded in the hand from an exploding firework. The man was at home on Tamarack Street when the injury occurred around 9:10 p.m. He was airlifted to Stony Brook University Hospital.

Facebook community groups have also taken notice of the increase in illegal fireworks, People on community Facebook pages have made a number of posts throughout the past couple of months with complaints over fireworks. People not only recognized the negative effect it had on animals, but others mentioned a child with special needs constantly being woken by the loud bangs outside. 

According to the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission, about 230 people a year are treated in emergency rooms because of injuries caused by fireworks. In 2017, sparklers caused 1,200 injuries.

“Every year, we do these reminders and talk about the dangers of fireworks,” County Executive Steve Bellone (D) said during a call with media after the holiday weekend. 

Suffolk County Police Department Chief Stuart Cameron said the county did have a higher incidence of fireworks-related calls, due to the limitations on large crowds at the usual fireworks shows.

Photo by David Ackerman

The showers of sparks that rained down on our heads the night of Fourth of July were inspiring — grandiose and touching all at once. Fireworks and Independence Day go together like old friends, a tradition that touches the heart. Long Island is home to many of these shows, from the Bald Hill spectacle to the fireworks set off on the West Beach in Port Jefferson.

Then there are the smaller shows, the ones put on by the local neighborhoods in the cool of night. While the grand displays of the professional shows are like standing in the majesty under the lights of Times Square, the small community shows are more like candles set along the mantle in a dark room. Both can be spectacular in their own ways.

Though of course, one is done by amateurs, often in illegal circumstances. And even after the festivities, fireworks continue to light up the sky despite its danger and how it may impact the surrounding community.

Unlike other New York counties, Suffolk County has bans on sparklers, along with firecrackers, bottle rockets, Roman candles, spinners and aerial devices. The Suffolk County Fire Marshals beg people to put down their own fireworks and attend one of the professionally manned shows.

And it seems they have had good reasons, both past and present, to press people for caution. Two women from Port Jefferson Station were injured with fireworks the night of July Fourth when one ended up in their backyard. While other media outlets reported only light injuries, in fact their injuries were much more severe, and readers will read that story in the coming week’s issue.

But of course, the injuries don’t just happen here on the North Shore. A 2018 report from the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission shows that in 2017, fireworks were involved in an estimated 12,900 injuries. Children under the age of 15 accounted for 36 percent of these injuries. Sparklers accounted for an estimated 1,200 emergency department-treated injuries.

And it’s not over yet. Even a week after July Fourth, fireworks continue to go up with sparks and bangs in the din of night.

Residents know to handle their pets scared by the booms of fireworks on Independence Day, but should they have to cower with their pets for days and days afterward?

And of course, that’s not even to mention U.S. veterans, many of whom know what they must do to stay safe if they are suffering from PTSD on July Fourth, but should they have to sequester themselves every day afterward for a week or more?

Sending up fireworks after July Fourth is inconsiderate, to say the least. We at TBR News Media beg people with excess fireworks to put them in packages or put them aside.

And next time July Fourth comes around, we urge caution when using these explosives. Nobody should have to find refuge from their neighbors on the day of the birth of this nation.

by -
0 1301

The annual fireworks show went off in Port Jefferson for Independence Day. Costs for the show was $20,000, provided by Bellport-based Fireworks by Grucci.