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TBR News Media

Dear Readers, 

We recently held our sixth annual adult coloring contest and once again the response was overwhelming! We received many colorful entries from readers all along the North Shore who used many different types of medium including colored pencils, gel pens, glitter, stick-on gems and markers to create their masterpieces. 

This year’s entries were reflective of how popular adult coloring has become and how relaxing it is. Jacyln Visco of Wading River wrote, “I really enjoy this contest. This is so much fun!” while Alice McAteer of Port Jefferson Station was appreciative of our community paper in general, saying “Thank you for keeping us informed and entertained. I look forward to my weekly issue even when the world around us is isolated.”

Although it was extremely difficult to choose a winner as every entry was beautiful and unique in its own way, our judges ultimately chose the coloring page by Ally Liff of Setauket who edged out the competition by adding intricate details to the background and adding a Locally Grown logo to the teapot vase.  Ally receives a three-year subscription to any one of our six papers, courtesy of Times Beacon Record News Media.

And surprise, all other participants will receive a one-year subscription as a thank you for entering our contest! Congratulations to all! Be safe and be well.

We are proud to present our second Times Beacon Record News Media Artist Coloring Book contest winners. Our intentions for the coloring book and contest was to offer our local art community grand exposure by fostering appreciation for the arts, as well as providing an enriching cultural experience for our audience.

We are grateful to Bank of America as our Coloring Book partner, to all the artists who contributed a beautiful gallery of sketches and to our coloring contest participants who submitted beautifully colored drawings, as well as our voters. Look for the winner’s colored masterpieces in select Bank of America financial centers.  To see the rest of the contestant’s entries, visit our TBR Facebook page: facebook.com/tbrbewsmedia and check out the photo galleries.

Congratulations to all our winners!

Category 1: Ages 5-12

Winner

 

Mia Radi

COLORIST 

Mia Radi, 5, Suffolk County
‘Nova’ by Marlene Bezich

1. What did you think of the coloring book?

 “It Looked Beautiful.”

2. Why did you select this drawing to color?

“I chose to color the doggie because my Nanny and Poppy have a doggie. Her name is Cali.”

3. What are your other hobbies?

“I like to play with Anthony. I love to play with my Mommy. I like to do Art.”

Marlene Bezich with her dog Nova

ARTIST 

Marlene Bezich, Port Jefferson

‘Nova’

1. What did you like about the winning colorist’s submission?

“First of all for a five year old her color understanding is amazing!!!  Color is very important to me in my artwork, I love Mia’s color choices!  She has successfully juxtapositioned complimentary colors to create a delight to the eye!!!!  Under further examination I feel that wrapping Nova in an orange background gives Nova’s spirit a feeling of love and warmth.  Her blue face indications “true blue” loyalty, and her green chest a sign of rebirth!  I noticed she stayed well between the lines displaying a very organized personality!!! Her family should be truly proud of her!!!!”

2. What was your inspiration for the drawing?

“Nova is my sister’s dog who they rescued from the Brookhaven Town Shelter.  She is the sweetest most loyal companion anyone could want.  Her markings are stunning, so as an animal lover I just had to capture her!  Hopefully this should be an example of the many wonderful dogs and cats available for adoption!  They deserve a chance too!!”

3. What did you think of the coloring book?

“I loved the coloring book!!! So many different subjects and styles!!! I’m so proud to be among the many talented artists who participated.  A Big THANK YOU for including us!!!!!!!”

4. What are your other hobbies?

“I love gardening and cooking!”

Runner Up

 

Junior Rivas

COLORIST 

Junior Rivas, 11, Central Islip
‘KAMAHAMEHA!!!’ by Clara Heller

Why did you select this drawing to color?

“Out of all the pictures to choose from, this was my favorite because I like Dragon Ball Z and Goku.”

ARTIST

Clara Heller, Port Jefferson

‘KAMAHAMEHA!!!’

What was your inspiration for the drawing?

“I grew up drawing, and I grew up watching Toonami, especially Dragon Ball Z. I stopped drawing regularly as I got older, but when the pandemic hit and I suddenly had all this free time, I thought I’d give it another try. And what better subject than that of my favorite childhood anime! I’m just happy other people appreciate Goku as much as I do!”

Category 2: Ages 13-19

Winner
Rebecca Fear

COLORIST 

Rebecca Fear, 19, South Setauket
‘Nature’s Healing Spirit’ by Iris Rosenhagen

1. What did you think of the coloring book?

“ I loved this coloring book because it included some beautiful pieces from different talented artists that brought a lot of positivity to me during this past year.”

2. Why did you select this drawing to color?

“I chose the piece Nature’s Healing Spirit because during this past year it’s important for everyone to find something to heal themselves during these difficult times. Through this coloring page I was able to use many vibrant colors and intricate detail. Coloring is relaxing for me and helped me heal during a stressful time. While coloring this page I had my newly adopted dog on my lap, which was also calming for me.”

3. What are your other hobbies?

“My other hobbies are singing, dancing, coloring, drawing, acting and volunteering.”

Iris Rosenhagen

ARTIST 

Iris Rosenhagen, Selden

‘Nature’s Healing Spirit’

1. What did you like about the winning colorist’s submission?

“I love Rebecca’s use of jewel tones. The colors that she used and her out of the box thinking for how to apply them are very much how I envisioned it had I colored it.”

2. What was your inspiration for the drawing?

“The subject of my drawing was inspired by this past year. Everyone has faced many challenges and fortunately nature has been an incredibly therapeutic outlet for healing.”

3. What did you think of the coloring book?

“Everyone’s art is just so beautiful, and I’m honored to be a part of it. In addition to Mother Nature being one of the best healers, so is art, and it’s wonderful that the community had this opportunity to experience and create art together.”

4. What are your other hobbies?

“Some of my other hobbies include yoga, holistic healing, vegan cooking, eco-activism, birding, and hiking.”

Runner Up

COLORIST 

Ella Psaltos, 16, Port Washington
‘Let’s Clean Up!’ by Bina Firestone

Why did you select this drawing to color?

“I chose that image because it reminded me of an old cartoon.”

ARTIST 

Bina Firestone, Port Jefferson Station

‘Let’s Clean Up!’

What was your inspiration for the drawing?

“The drawing was from a watercolor I had recently completed. I had wanted to create a winter scene, but something different than a pristine and peaceful landscape. I started out with the idea of sending a snowplow through a residential neighborhood. Then I remembered how, after a snow, all the neighbors would emerge from their homes, and the street would become a hive of activity, so I added the people to the scene.”

Category 3: Ages 20+

Winner

COLORIST 

Hedi Flickstein, Coram
‘Lily’ by Christopher Reisman

1. What did you think of the coloring book?

“It was very good. I wish more of the drawings had white space to color.”

2. Why did you select this drawing to color?

“It was a very beautiful rendition of the picture. I wanted to add things like eyeshadow, lipstick and nail polish. She needed some beautification.”

3. What are your other hobbies?

“Senior groups, school related groups, Legislative groups, groups that help the handicapped.”

Christopher Reisman

ARTIST 

Christopher Reisman, Shoreham

‘Lily’

1. What did you like about the winning colorist’s submission?

“I love the  way the artist took Lily to a new look and dressed her up a bit. Fabulous!”

2. What was your inspiration for the drawing?

“My inspiration for the drawing came from a picture in the New York Times Magazine section several years ago. I fell in love with the pose and the mystique of the lady. I added the flowers and Lily was born.” 

3. What did you think of the coloring book?

“I think the coloring  book gives a wonderful view of fine art by Long Island artists. I think this should be very inspiring to a lot of people. What a great way to add more beauty into the world, which the world really needs.”

4. What are your other hobbies?

“My other hobbies are making music, sewing and gardening and taking care of our wonderful magic sanctuary every day. Actually my sewing is more than a hobby. It is a great creative  joyful experience for me to design and make one of a kind wearable art. I love it.”

Runner Up

COLORIST 

Evelyn Rose, 78, Smithtown
‘Nature’s Healing Spirit’ by Iris Rosenhagen

Why did you select this drawing to color?

“She was very whimsical!”

ARTIST 

Iris Rosenhagen

‘Nature’s Healing Spirit’

What was your inspiration for the drawing?

“In addition to being inspired by nature, I was inspired by the future colorists.  I love the idea of someone interacting with my art.  The opportunity of two creative energies coming together is so motivating to me.”

And there’s more! Six Long Island nonprofits, chosen by the winners & artists, will share $10,000 in community funding from Bank of America.

 

Stock photo

In observance of Memorial Day,  the office of TBR News Media will be closed today, Monday, May 31. Thank you to the brave men and women who have made the ultimate sacrifice.

“Our flag does not fly because the wind moves it.

It flies with the last breath of each soldier who died protecting it.”

– Unknown

By Leah S. Dunaief

Leah Dunaief

Incredible as it seems to us, we are celebrating with a special section this week the 45th anniversary of our newspaper and media group now called TBR. Where did those 45 years go?

When we reconstruct the events of both the news and behind the scenes at the newspapers over those 2340 issues, we have a chronicle of the passing time between the first edition of The Village Times and today. In this week’s issue, you will find, in a highly abridged fashion, our attempt to do just that.  We hope it brings back good memories for you because, if you have lived here during any of that time, it bears witness to what was happening around you as well.

For me the section puts into tangible form the extraordinary work of so many dedicated and talented people who have worked at the paper to gather and present the news in a balanced and cogent fashion. Some of the news has been of happy events: our children’s academic and extracurricular triumphs, our neighbors’ efforts enriching our villages through their civic, political and artistic involvement, the interesting lives we have been able to highlight, our shared history, the businesses and what they had to offer in their ads. Some of what we have printed is of necessity not happy stories. But always all the individual issues defined and held together our hometown. It has been said that what marks the boundaries of a community are its school district and the local newspaper.

Newspapers and other media are more than their reporters and editors. Almost all publications, whether print or digital, have basically the same structure: five departments. Those are editorial, advertising, art and production, business and distribution. Some of the departments are supportive of others, but I can tell you emphatically that all, with their different staffers’ skills, are vitally important and must function in tandem in order to produce the final product.

Many of our staffers have gone on to larger media companies and distinguished themselves on a bigger stage. Sometimes they come back for nostalgic visits and to let us know how they are doing. We are proud of them. Hometown papers and digital platforms are often stepping stones that provide experience and hone skills in the communications industry. But I believe none of those larger arenas is more important than the local papers, where we have to meet and answer to our readers and advertisers in the supermarkets and at the ballfields. And while there are many larger media that carry the national and international news, there are only the local newspapers and websites that tell what’s happening and what’s relevant in our daily lives.

This past year with civic unrest, and with COVID-19, has been particularly difficult for readers and business people alike. It has also been difficult for our staff. With small businesses and their advertising, the main source of our revenues and business model falling by the wayside as residents remained in lockdown, we have had to innovate repeatedly in order to survive. We were forced to reduce the number of employees, and those that remain have taken on more responsibilities even as their hours have been cut. It would have been easier to close down and wait for the pandemic to pass, but we couldn’t do that. We are essential workers, keeping our readers informed of vital information about the disease and the responses of our health systems, our educators and our government. We also needed to let people know where to buy food and supplies when so much of routine commerce had shuttered.

How were people coping, what organizations needed help, where would volunteer efforts be most needed, were all critical facts to know for our combined survival, and we had to come in to work and go out amidst the virus and the protests to gather and then communicate the news. We also were able to reassure with our coverage that ordinary life was continuing, despite the hardships.

On this occasion, when we briefly shine the spotlight on ourselves, I want to salute, among all the essential workers, the brave and committed staff of TBR. THANK YOU.

Steven Zaitz won first place in the Spot News Photo category for this picture which was featured on the cover of The Village Times Herald on Nov. 5, 2020

By Heidi Sutton

From news articles and feature stories to photography, special supplements and classifieds, Times Beacon Record News Media raked in 10 awards, including three for first place, from the New York Press Association’s annual Better Newspaper Contest. The winners were announced during NYPA’s annual, and this year’s virtual Spring Conference on April 8 and 9. Over 150 newspapers competed for awards in 64 categories. 

Editor Julianne Mosher won third place in the News Story category for her article titled “Local pharmacies concerned over Amazon Pharmacy.” The judge wrote, “Well done, with good interviews that give the reader the complete picture.” Mosher also won third place in the Feature Story category for “Local dance studios change shape in the age of COVID.”

“This story shows the other side of the COVID-19 pandemic,” commented the judge. “It may not be about health care workers, but it told a story of resilience on the part of businesses and young people looking to have some sense of normalcy.”

Photo by Steven Zaitz

Former editor Kyle Barr also did well, winning first place in the Feature Story category with his article, “History of Pride: LI’s first LGBT march reveals history of fighting prejudice.” The judge commented, “This piece was extremely well done and not only covered the history of the event, but brought the emotions of it to the forefront.” Barr also received an honorable mention in the News Story category for his article “Bars/restaurants on north shore struggle to comply with restrictions.”

Reporter Daniel Dunaief won second place in the Feature Story category for his piece, “Health care workers become critical partners in viral battles,” which honored local health care workers who put themselves in harm’s way to offer comfort, cures and solutions for COVID-19. The judge wrote, “This story brought us the stories of health care heroes that have been so important in all of our communities this past year.”

Freelance photographer Steven Zaitz won first place in the Spot News Photo category for an emotional image captured at a Trump rally last October.“The moment that tells the whole story. Great shot to sum up all sides and be fair to all points,” commented the judge.

 

Zaitz also won third place in the Sports Feature Photo category. The image, which was featured in the article, “Let’s Play Two: Little League Holds Championship Games,” impressed the judge. “In our state (of Pennsylvania), it’s no longer allowed to tank the catcher. If the same is true in New York, at least this little guy got as much as he could out of his illegal action. The determined catcher’s expression completes the scene.” for an image that was featured in the article, “Let’s play two: little league holds championship games.” 

TBR News Media won first place in the Best Public Service or Non-Profit Special Section for its 2020 Graduation supplement. “What a fantastic section to put together for Senior Class, their families, and the community during a pandemic. Outstanding work!” gushed the judge. The paper won second place in the Innovative Ad Project category for its TBR Artist Coloring Book which the judges said was a “great idea to get the readers to interact with newspapers and doing a contest.” 

The paper also won second place in the Classified Advertising category. “This newspaper has created a classified section that does not feel overbearing or overcrowded. With judicial use of space and bolded type, the section is easy to read,” wrote the judge.

“We are, of course, thrilled to continue our winning ways in the annual New York Press Association Better Newspaper Contest,” said Publisher Leah Dunaief. “But some things must be said particularly for this year’s performance. First, as always, we feel so privileged for the chance to serve the community with our newspapers, website and social media. We are grateful for the support of both readers and advertisers in every season and especially now, during this unprecedented time of the COVID-19 pandemic, as we have struggled to fulfill our mission of publishing relevant news and information.”

“The staff and I have drawn inspiration from the people who live and work in the community. They have tirelessly delivered food, provided health care and ensured that everyone endured through a health and economic challenge we have never before seen but are now confronting. We have been deeply moved by the willingness to help each other that we have witnessed in order to get to a safer tomorrow. And finally, blessings on all our clearly talented staff members, without whose Herculean efforts we could not prevail.”

NYPA holds the Better Newspaper Contest each year during their spring conference. For a full list of winners and more information, visit nynewspapers.com.

 

Join us in celebrating local women’s successes

By Leah S. Dunaief

Leah Dunaief

As you know, March is Women’s History Month, honoring the contributions of women to history, culture and society. Did you know that women in the United States of America could not own property until 1862? You probably know from all the recent centennial publicity that women are able to vote only since 1920. But did you know that a woman could not have a credit card in her name until 1974? Now that is a startling statistic because it is not plucked from the dustbins of history but rather, for us of a certain age, a contemporary one. After all, I started The Village Times, the first newspaper of Times Beacon Record News Media, on April 8,1976. Getting a credit card then, whether for business or personal use, was a big complicated deal and how to run a business without one?

You might say we women in the workplace have indeed come a long way. And even though women still earn only 81cents for every dollar men earn, we can be pleased with our success so far. I’m saying “pleased,” but not yet “satisfied.”

Women’s History Month grew out of Women’s History Week, first celebrated in Sonoma County, California, in 1978 to acknowledge the singular contributions of women that had been largely ignored in most history books. The idea spread to other communities and President Jimmy Carter adapted it by presidential proclamation to a national observance in 1980. Since 1987, it has been celebrated annually by congressional resolution for the entire month of March in the United States, made to overlap International Women’s Day on March 8.

Today there are some 12.3 million women-owned businesses in the U.S., according to the National Association of Women Business Owners. Compare that to 402,000 women-owned businesses in 1972. Further, they generate 1.8 trillion dollars a year. There are 114% more women entrepreneurs than 20 years ago, starting roughly 1,821 new businesses every day, and that plays a significant role in the United States economy.

We want to call your attention to these female success stories on a local level. You probably don’t think of who owns the business when you shop in a store or use a service, nor should you. We women have proven ourselves adept at business and professional management, and seek nothing more than the same opportunities to support ourselves, our families, our employees, and to serve the public that men have enjoyed over the centuries.

Still, considering how far we have come today, we can’t be faulted in any demonstration of business success, such as in this section, for having a little extra gleam in our eye.

 

Glen and Tara Grippe
Patrice and Jimmy Perreca, Sound Beach
Patrice and Jimmy Perreca

It was Thanksgiving weekend 1995. I was recently divorced and a teacher colleague and I decided that we should go out that Friday night. We decided on the Unitarian Church in Stony Brook, where they held gatherings for singles. Chairs forming circles of ten were throughout the room. A moderator posed questions we each had a minute to answer. We moved to different circles and at the end of the night, I found myself sitting next to a guy who had been in the first group! His name was Jim and he told me later at the diner where we went for coffee that he had planned that! We were married in 1997 and still celebrate Nov. 24th as a special anniversary!

Sue and Dave Rosner, East Setauket
Dave and Sue Rosner

What a love story!  When romance starts again at age 57, the second time around can be the best!

Sue and Dave met on Match.com 10 years ago. He said it was her smile that attracted him to her profile picture, and she said it was his blue eyes. As it turned out, they both had easy going personalities, enjoyed outside activities, music and adventure. Similarly, together they had 3 daughters who became instant friends once they met. Their first date was at “Sweet Mamma’s” in Northport for brunch. Dave brought along their Zodiac Signs, which matched them as well!  Now married for 8 years, they truly are each other’s soul mate!

Robin and Cliff Lemkin, East Setauket
Cliff and Robin Lemkin

It was a lovely fall day in 1983. I was strolling around the Smith Haven Mall when I realized it was time for an eye exam. Off I went to Sterling Optical.

As I was settling into the exam chair, this very handsome, adorable and very single Optometrist entered the room. The examination began. Dr. Lemkin looked into my beautiful green eyes. He proceeded to tell me that I had the most Captivating Corneas, the most Ravishing Retinas and the most Iridescent Irises that he had ever seen!

Shortly after we went on our first date. We were married on May 25th, l986 at the North Shore Jewish Center. Cliff and I were the first guests to stay in the honeymoon suite at the newly opened Danfords Hotel.

Kate and Larry Passaretti, Setauket
Kate and Larry Passaretti

Larry and I met in an evening business course at Nassau Community College in 1978.  We’re  blessed with two children … a wonderful son-in-law and grandson and a sweet future daughter-in-law!

Life is good and we feel fortunate to maintain good health so we can enjoy all that is to be. As my dear Dad used to always say to be happy in life you need three things:

“… someone to love … something to do … and something to look forward to …”

… we look forward to our son’s wedding this summer!!

Glen & Tara Grippe, Setauket

We met in 11th grade in the hallways of Ward Melville High School. We were high school sweethearts and even attended the 1990 Ward Melville Senior Prom together. We recently celebrated 25 years of marriage in November of 2020 and have two children, Connor and Emily who are both college students.

 

 

 

And a post from TBR News Media’s Instagram …

Our Moms were pregnant at the same time. He was born three weeks after me and we played together in my sandbox as toddlers. So, pretty much known each other forever. Reconnected on FB after 25 years without speaking.

— Kristen Memoli, Huntington

Thank you to all who participated in TBR News Media’s How I Met My Mate contest! Congratulations to Patrice and Jimmy Perreca of Sound Beach! They win dinner for two at Bliss Restaurant in East Setauket with a choice of dining in or takeout. Happy Valentine’s Day!