Tags Posts tagged with "Jan Guarino"

Jan Guarino

'Row Me Away' by Jan Guarino

*This article has been updated on July 7, 2022.

The Huntington Historical Society will present a series of summer art workshops for adults at the Conklin Barn, 2 High Street, Huntington starting on July 12:

Collaging 

GIVEN BY: ANNE FOX 

Free yourself of the usual art rules with Paper Collage. Merely with a pair of scissors, glue, and some maga zines, you can let your imagination fly and create a colorful work of art. Do abstract, do figurative, do land scapes. Let the scissors and your imagination be your guides. 

Tuesday, July 12th 1-3 pm or Tuesday, July 26th 1-3 pm 

Member price $35 Non-member price $45, Class size limited to 15 

Fearless Watercolors  – Only one spot left!

GIVEN BY: JAN GUARINO 

Artist Jan Guarino

I was once you… Struggling to become a better watercolorist and felt I was missing many of the basics needed  to be excel. Having taught watercolors for the past 15 years I know what you need and can help you build your  painting skills with specific techniques, my clear process to putting paint and water to paper will help you  more successfully express your passion for this medium. I’ll teach you in a way that emulates what I needed  as a student and didn’t get. This Basics Workshop takes many pieces and pulls them together in this 3-evening  workshop. Learn the correct brush strokes, understand color wheel, avoid muddy results, saving and correcting  whites and much more. The outcome will be that you become empowered by clear and innovative ideas. You  already have the passion and desire, combined with my suggestions ~ you can become a more confident water colorist. All it takes is you and practice! 

*Three Wednesday nights-3-part series, 6:30-9:00 pm, *July 27th, August 3rd, August 10th Member price $120, non-member price $150, Class size limited to 20 

Calligraffiti  

GIVEN BY: HELEN MURDOCK-PREP 

We all know how to type and text— but let’s get back to the power of the pen by learning the Art of Beautiful  Handwriting in this style called, Calligraffiti! Using a brush marker, we’ll have fun expressing ourselves in  this exciting, cursive lettering form that adds bold graffiti elements to make our words pop! Thursday, July 28th 1-3 pm or Thursday, August 11th 7-9pm  

Member price $35 Non-member price $45, Class size limited to 20

*Day time workshops – coffee, tea and delicious baked goods will be served!

*Night time workshops- wine, seltzer, fruit and cheese will be served!

For more information or to register, visit www.huntingtonhistoricalsociety.org.



By Melissa Arnold

With its many beaches, parks, lakes and farmland, it’s easy to see that Long Island is full of natural beauty. For the local art community, the variety of landscapes provide a constant source of inspiration.

Of course, nature is always changing, but not only with the seasons. Global warming continues to affect all of us, driving home the message that nothing is guaranteed and that we must work together to protect our world.

The Smithtown Township Arts Council (STAC) is reflecting on climate change and the environment through an extended series of exhibits at the Mills Pond Gallery in St. James that began this past fall. Their next exhibit, Long Island Landscapes: From Awe to Action, invites viewers to appreciate the beauty of this area while considering what they might do to preserve it. The show opens Feb. 5.

“I like to do a local, landscape-based exhibit each year, and I wanted to see if there was a way to connect it to the theme of climate change,” said Allison Cruz, executive director at the Mills Pond Gallery. “Art is a method of communication, a way to help people see things and make connections in new ways. We can read the newspaper or watch the news to see that the ice caps are melting and the world is heating up, but to see these artistic expressions of our area makes you realize we might not have them forever.”

The exhibit features 60 works from 53 Long Island artists. A variety of styles and mediums will be on display, including acrylic, watercolor, oil, graphite and charcoal.

Each artist also took time to reflect on what the natural world and environmental conservation means to them.

Anita Simmons of Commack finds her inspiration while going for a drive, walking through area parks or spending the day at the beach. A retired accountant and the daughter of an avid gardener, Simmons grew up next to sprawling fields of corn and potatoes — crops that are no longer as common on Long Island.

“My paintings are an emotional response to what can be seen in the natural landscape of Long Island, which I have enjoyed all my life,” she said. “My dad would plant morning glories that grew up our chimney every year, and I have always loved them. When I saw the morning glories at Schneider Farm in Melville, I just had to photograph them to paint later.”

Ellen Ferrigno often paints scenes very close to her home in Port Jefferson. Protecting the environment has been a part of her life for many years, and she eventually became a Cornell Cooperative Master Gardener to increase her own understanding and educate others about the natural world.

“What supports nature’s environment is a community as well as individual efforts. Therefore, I paint these scenes as reminders of what nature’s beauty is,” she explained. “During the early part of the pandemic, I researched and painted the plants in my gardens that attract beneficial insects, provide a soothing tea or feed the birds. I often included a narrative to educate the art viewers. I also found myself increasing my gardens, putting out feeders for the birds and attracting the bees.”

Cruz and STAC have partnered with a number of local environmental organizations to provide information, literature and ways for visitors to support their cause. They include The Nature Conservancy, Defend H2O, Save the Sound, The Sierra Club, Higher Ground, The Coastal Research and Education Society of Long Island, the Seatuck Environmental Association, Save the Great South Bay, Long Island Water, and Group for the East End.

“We have so many wonderful locally-focused groups that work hard every day to protect and preserve our environment here,” said Cruz. “This isn’t just about appreciating beautiful art — we also want to bring attention to all the good these groups are doing and encourage visitors to get involved.” 

Along with Simmons and Ferrigno, artists participating in this exhibit include Marsha Abrams, Lucia Alberti, Tina Anthony, Shain Bard, Ron Becker, Claudia Bedell, Sheila Breck, Joyce Bressler, Renee Caine, Carol Ceraso, Patricia Cisek, Tobi Cohen, Donna Corvi, Lou Deutsch, Julie Doczi, Karin Dutra, Dorothy Fortuna, Donna Gabusi, Vivian Gattuso, Jan Guarino, Regina Halliday, David Herman, Wendy Hildreth-Spence, Gia Horton Schifano, John Hunt, Lynn Kinsella, Liz Kolligs, Lynn Liebert, E Craig Marcin, Avrel Menkes, Annette Napolitano, Catherine Rezin, Robert Roehrig, Oscar Santiago, Hillary Serota Needle, Gisela Skoglund, Lynn Staiano, Madeline Stare, Angela Stratton, John Taylor, Tracy Tekverk, Christine Tudor, Nicholas Valentino, Daniel van Benthuysen, Mary Ann Vetter, Mary Waka, Robert Wallkam, Patty Yantz, and Theodora Zavala.

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Long Island Landscapes: From Awe to Action is on view at the Mill Pond Gallery, 660 Route 25A, Saint James from Feb. 5 through Feb. 26 Proof of vaccination and masks are required to visit. Meet the artists at an opening reception at the gallery on Feb. 5 from noon to 4 p.m. For more information about the exhibit and what you can do to protect the environment, call 631- 862-6575 or visit www.millspondgallery.org.

By Heidi Sutton

It is said that the past is always an important part of the present. It is also said that a picture is worth a thousand words. The Smithtown Township Arts Council’s Mills Pond Gallery in St. James has taken those two adages and melded them into an exciting new summer exhibit, Visualizing the Past. The juried show opens Aug. 7 and runs through Sept. 5.

Juror Carol Strickland, who selected 52 works for the exhibit, was intrigued by Emily Dickinson’s lines — Memory is a strange bell, both jubilee and knell. She asked artists to respond to that in visual terms—both the celebratory memories and sad ones. The call was very open-ended, leaving a lot of room for varying interpretations. 

“Selecting artworks to include in the exhibition was very difficult because we received so many entries that were both technically proficient and evocative. I was especially moved in deciding what to accept by those artists who took risks and showed me new perspectives,” said Strickland. “Art conveys what can’t be communicated in words, and my response to so many entries was non-verbal, like an inner vibration that brought a shock of recognition.”

Allison Cruz, Executive Director of the Mills Pond Gallery, is pleased with the beautiful show which incorporates many types of mediums including acrylic, charcoal, colored pencil, collage, fused glass, ink, mixed media, oil, pastel, watercolor and welding. 

“The artists have shared memories or recalled stories and events and assembled them in a variety of media to be seen and experienced by others. Their works offer narratives open to a wide range of interpretation and expression. For me, that is the strength in this exhibit. I hope it encourages the viewers to reflect on their own memories and hopefully learn that art is a wonderful tool to explore different points of view, gain understanding and experience the world in different ways,” she said.

Participating artists include Amal, Tina Anthony, Victoria Beckert, Sheri Berman, Jean Marie Bucich, Frank Casucci, Eric Chimon, Donna Corvi, Caryn Coville, Brigham Dimick, Paul Edelson, Elizabeth Fusco, Kathleen Gerlach, Ashley Rose Gillin, Maureen Ginipro, Jan Guarino, Heidi Hogden, Elizabeth Kelly, Julianna Kirk, Sueim Koo, Cara London, Dorothy Lorenze, Margaret Marzullo, Briana McGinley-Downey, Georgia Rittenhouse McKenna, Avrel Susan Menkes, Cliff Miller, Gail Neuman, Lily Newland, Catherine Rezin, Alan Richards, Roberta Rogers, Oscar Santiago, Alaina Scheffer, Stacey Schuman, Alisa Shea, Faith Skelos, Erica Perjatel Stolba, Angela Stratton, Hui Su-Kennedy, Daniel Van Benthuysen, and Taylor West.

The Mills Pond Gallery, 660 Route 25A, St. James will present Visualizing the Past from Aug. 7 to Sept. 5. The public is invited to an opening reception on Aug. 7 from 12:30 to 3:30 p.m. For more information, call 631-862-6575 or visit www.millspondgallery.org.

When channeling their creativity, artists sometimes venture beyond the canvas and turn their attention to art that can adorn the human body. Such is the case with the Huntington Arts Council’s latest juried exhibit, Wearable Art 2.0. The show opened at the HAC’s Main Street Gallery on July 2. 

Back by popular demand, the exhibit features artwork that meets at the intersection of fashion and fine art through design, costume, or culture. Submissions are representative of the creative inspiration found in garments, accessories (art jewelry, masks, bags, etc.), and representational work (design boards, performance images, etc.). 

The show was juried by Dominique Maciejka, owner of Paper Doll Vintage Boutique in Sayville and Paper Doll Curiosity Shoppe in Patchogue.

“The work submitted showcased a beautiful range of what wearable art can mean to artists and how it can be interpreted. The works chosen exemplified a strong vision conceptually, technically or a combination of both. Some pieces were more traditional, while others had a modern and contemporary spin for a wonderful variety of works,” said Maciejka.

Participating artists include Lisa Cangemi, Oksana Danziger, Ciamara Donawa, Diane Godlewski, Steven Goldleaf, Nathaly Gomez, Jan Guarino, Veronica Haley, Drew Kane, Julianna Kirk, Allison Mack, Lorraine Manzo Angeletti, Meagan J. Meehan, John Micheals, Gail Neuman, Luda Pahl, Eileen Palmer, Athena Protonentis, Amanda Reilly, Cindy Russell, Jasmine Scarlatos, Meryl Shapiro, Danangelowe Spencer, Steven Tze, Ana Urbach and JoAnn Zambito.

Wearable Art 2.0 is a direct extension of the first version of this theme that took place in our Main Street Gallery three years ago. The creativity, technique, and artistry represented in this revival of Wearable Art has exceeded our expectations,” said Marc Courtade, Executive Director of the Huntington Arts Council.

The following participating artists received special acknowledgement from Maciejka at a private reception on July 9.

Best in Show: 
Covid Warrior by Ana Urbach
Honorable Mentions:
Bejeweled & Bedazzled Collection by Meghan J. Meehan
Unfinished by Luda Pahl
Hypnotic Bee Scarf  by Amanda Reilly
It’s a Trend DON’T SHOOT by Danangelowe Spencer
Fawl by Steven Tze

“The interpretation of the call is a true testament to how art can be designed and expressed in so many impactful and beautiful ways. Whether it be jewelry, quilted jackets, existing items that have been customized or hand painted silk, the exhibit is a show stopper. All are invited to stop by our gallery and experience the work in person,” said Courtade. 

The Huntington Arts Council’s Main Street Gallery, 213 Main St., Huntington will present Wearable Art 2.0 through July 31. The exhibit is also on view online. Hours for the gallery are Tuesday to Friday from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. For weekend hours, visit www.huntingtonarts.org or call 631-271-8423.

**This article was updated on July 13 to announce Best in Show and Honorable Mentions.

'Feeling Blue,' acrylic, by Cheryl Cass-Zampiva Image courtesy of Mills Pond Gallery

Smithtown Township Arts Council’s Mills Pond Gallery highlights the talents of 67 of its artist members with its annual Member Artist Showcase exhibit of original fine art for sale from June 19 through July 18. Exhibiting artists hail from 40 communities across Long Island as well as New Jersey, Maryland, North Carolina and Florida.

A wide variety of media is represented including acrylic, digital art, ink etching, mixed media, oil, pastel, photography, plaster & found objects, silk dyes on silk, solar plate etching, torn paper collage, and watercolor.

‘Christmas Cactus’
Photograph
By Kathee Shaff Kelson, Stony Brook
Image courtesy of Mills Pond Gallery

“The Member Artist Showcase is an important show to me. We have such an abundance of talent in our membership,” said Allison Cruz, Executive Director of the Mills Pond Gallery. “I love to give artists the opportunity to choose a piece of their work to exhibit. I know artists are usually under many constraints of Juried Exhibits due to requirements of style or medium or size. It is great to give them an opportunity to show something that maybe they haven’t had the opportunity to exhibit due to those constraints or maybe something they have created using a new medium or style. I am always excited to see what they enter!”  

This year’s juror is freelance art consultant and curator Pam J. Brown, the Director and Curator of The Anthony Giordano Gallery at Dowling College for 16 years. Brown will choose four winning artists to participate in a future Winners Exhibit at the gallery.

Participating artists include Marsha Abrams, Lucia Alberti, Tina Anthony, Ross Barbera, Shain Bard, Ron Becker, Renee Blank, Kyle Blumenthal, Joyce Bressler, Alberto Jorge Carol, Cheryl Cass-Zampiva, Linda Ann Catucci, Carol Ceraso, Rocco Citeno, Donna Corvi, Teresa Cromwell, Tania Degen, Julie Doczi, Beth Drucker, JoAnne Dumas, Karin Dutra, Paul Edelson, Ellen Ferrigno, Donna Gabusi, Vivian Gattuso, Maureen Ginipro, Jan Guarino, Margaret Henning, David Herman, David Jaycox, Jr., Modern Fossils: Judith Marchand & David P. Horowitz, James Kelson, Kathee Shaff Kelson, Myungja Anna Koh, Susan Kozodoy Silkowitz, Ann Legere, Frank Loehr, Terence McManus, Paul Mele, Margaret Minardi, Karen George Mortimore, Annette Napolitano, Diane Oliva, Catherine Rezin, Robin Roberts, Robert Roehrig, Lori Scarlatos, Gia Schifano, Anita G. Schnirman, Joan Schwartzman, Kenneth Schwartzman, Hillary Serota Needle, Faith Skelos, Gisela Skoglund, Mike Stanko, Madeline Stare, John Taylor, Tracy Tekverk, Oxana Uryasev, Nicholas Valentino, Daniel van Benthuysen, Mary Ann Vetter, Pamela Waldroup, Don Weber, M. Ellen Winter, Patty Yantz, and Theodora Zavala.

“This show is about celebrating the talents of our artist members and I feel it does just that,” said Cruz.

The Mills Pond Gallery, 660 Route 25A, St. James presents its Member Artist Showcase from June 19 to July 18. The public is invited to an opening reception on Saturday, June 19 from noon to 2 p.m. or 2 to 4 p.m. (reservations are required) to meet the exhibiting artists and view their work. Admission to the gallery is always free. The gallery is open Wednesday to Friday from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. and Saturday and Sunday from noon to 4 p.m. The gallery is closed Mondays and  Tuesdays and July 3 and 4. Please call 631-862-6575 or visit www.millspondgallery.org for more information.

Every image I choose to paint is an answer to the question ‘What drew me to this subject?’ As I begin painting, I let go and trust my instincts to guide me to discover the answer.”

By Irene Ruddock

Jan Guarino

Jan Guarino is a graduate of the Fashion Institute of Design which led to a forty-five-year career as award winning graphic designer. Her company, Guarino Graphics, combined her skill in graphic designs with her fine art background to build the brands of hundreds of Long Island companies. Today, the East Northport resident has evolved into a full-time watercolor artist/teacher, sharing her knowledge in classes and workshops, and exhibiting in various galleries.

When you were growing up, did you have any mentors that led you to pursue an art career?

I was fortunate that in my senior year in high school, I was able to major in art and received Artist of the Year award. When a previous graduate came back to show us her portfolio, it changed my focus and I immediately applied to FIT. Those two years I was totally in my element, surrounded by other students and teachers who were working artists. It was a major shift and set me in motion for my advertising, marketing and art career.

How did your years owning a graphic design company inform, and then, catapult your career in art?

While it was more about doing graphics for businesses, my clients trusted my design esthetic giving me tremendous freedom to create. Through helping these businesses grow, I knew exactly what to do for myself.

What is it about a subject that inspires you to pick up your brush and start to paint?

I don’t choose my subjects as much as they seem to choose me. It may be a place I visited during my travels … the way the light is hitting the landscape, people, the architecture that reveals some truth to me. But when I see it, there is a moment where something grabs me and causes me to pause. I am overcome by a stirring and a knowing that I must paint it. 

What are the qualities of watercolor that especially intrigue you?

This is truly a magical medium. When you let it go, it paints itself. So I don’t work on controlling the paints as much as allowing the natural aspects of the paints to move for me. I embrace the blossoms, drips, and splatters of watercolors. My approach to painting is to encompass that looseness with details as much as possible.

Do you consider yourself a colorist?

Ha, yes well, when I see tonalists work and their colors or lack thereof, I’d have to say yes, I am a colorist. My process is more about letting the paints mix on the paper rather than on a palette. This amps up the unusual colors and helps to go beyond just describing a scene ~  lending a heightened importance even to everyday subjects.

What is it about your special style that you think draws people to your art?

I do feel a lot of it is my fearless attack of the paint to paper, the freshness … to depict the scene as an interpretation, not a literal translation.

How has your knowledge of social media helped to widen your audience?

I have a very strong understanding of basic marketing. It has to do with all the students, friends and colleagues that have referred me over the years. Social media is often still a mystery to me, but you can find me on Instagram, Facebook, LinkedIn, YouTube, and Pinterest. So it has literally grown to be international now as I have students as far as the UK and Australia. I am amazed how the world has gotten smaller using social media.

Tell me about your YouTube demos.

I do my best work when I am demoing in front of a class. It is exciting and I feel that the energy of my students is in the painting with me. So I started recording my classes as a way to make them accessible to my students beyond the classes.

There are also some classes that I made into videos I call “Fixer Uppers” where I show students how to correct, complete or revise their own paintings. I think it is a very fresh way to show everyone how close they are to being finished, and more importantly, happy with the results.

What are your favorite brands of watercolor paint, brushes and paper?

My favorite watercolor paints to use is Maimari Blu and Daniel Smith. I look for what the paints do, more than I look for the color. I ask “Does it move well in water, does it break into other colors or granulate?” —these are some of the many qualities I look for to aid me in my process. My favorite paper is Arches 300lb hot press paper and I’m very happy with synthetic brushes like Silver Black Velvet series or Escoda Prado. A complete list is on my website.

What advice do you give your students?

Relax and allow the paint to work for you. And practice. It doesn’t happen in one class a week. Take classes and workshops, even if you pick up one small thing from them … better to try and integrate it to make it your own. Thinking of it this way will help you to advance your art.

What is the most rewarding thing about being an artist for you?

Well, I’d have to say it has given my life a reason to show up every week for my students. Knowing they are there and so open to learning and growing is extremely meaningful for me. It has not only given me a second career, it has given me a profound new purpose.

Where do you exhibit?

I am in the FireFly Artists Gallery and the Nest on Main in the Village of Northport. My work has also been exhibited at the Huntington Arts Council, Mills Pond Gallery, Art League of Long Island, The Long Island Museum, The Heckscher Museum, and Islip Arts Council.

You are a very versatile artist who excels in so many genres including landscape, still life, people and animal portraits. Do you have a favorite?

I truly love it all. I just love the adventure of exploring something I haven’t painted before and testing out my skill on a new subject.

Where may people get in touch with you and learn about your classes and workshops?   

I have a four-day workshop scheduled for October 14 to 17 in Vermont at the Landgrove Inn where you stay, dine, and paint all on the property. It’s heaven! And I am planning another artists’ trip to Italy next fall in the Cinque Terre area.

I also do a Jam-Cam with the Harborfield and South Huntington libraries where you can see me paint a portrait in under an hour. I currently teach virtual classes. You may sign up for weekly updates on my website for information at [email protected]  I look forward to welcoming you!