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Drugs

Javon Harrington. Photo from PIO

Suffolk County Police arrested a man in Selden Feb. 11 for driving under the influence of drugs after a two-vehicle crash.

Javon Harrington was operating a 2003 Infiniti on North Evergreen Drive at a high speed when he went through a stop sign at Pine Street and struck a 2009 Dodge, and then a tree. Harrington, 20, of Coram, and his passengers Elijah Quinitchette, 24, of Coram and Eddie Bray, 20, of Coram were transported to Stony Brook University Hospital via Selden Fire Department Ambulance. Bray suffered serious but non-life-threatening injuries. Harrington and Quinitchette suffered minor injuries.

The 19-year-old man driving the Dodge, and his two passengers, were also transported to Stony Brook University Hospital via Selden Fire Department Ambulance for observation.

Sixth Squad detectives arrested Harrington and charged him with driving while ability impaired by drugs. He was scheduled to be arraigned at First District Court in Central Islip Feb. 12.

Both vehicles were impounded for safety checks and the investigation is ongiong.

Dom Spada speaks to kids at the fire house in Halesite. Photo from Dom Spada

By Victoria Espinoza

After responding to calls for drug overdose after drug overdose, one Halesite Fire Department firefighter said enough is enough.

Second Assistant Fire Chief Dom Spada said he got sick of going on overdose calls and wanted to do more —  so he created a drug prevention and education program called Be Smart, Don’t Start: A Drug and Alcohol Free Lifestyle.

Spada, who is also deputy mayor and police commissioner of Huntington Bay, said one drug overdose call in particular was the catalyst for the program.

“I went on a call on Thanksgiving morning, and there was a 19-year-old girl dead,” he said in a phone interview. “Something compelled me to go to the wake. So I did and I chatted with her mom, who told me this had been a long road for the family, since the girl had started using in sixth grade. That blew me away.”

Spada said it hit him especially hard because he has two young children. He created Be Smart, Don’t Start, where he speaks to sixth-, seventh-, eighth- and ninth-graders about the dangers of using drugs, and how they can stay safe.

“I describe the calls I go on, and it can get pretty graphic,” he said. “We also talk about the reasons why kids turn to drugs; peer pressure, bullying, problems at home. I’ve heard it all.”

Spada said he utilizes role-playing scenarios with the kids.

“The presentation is very direct and speaks to specific experiences that certain families and agencies have had with addiction. What it makes very clear is that the issue crosses demographics and neighborhoods.”
— Jim Polansky

“I give them a script and examples on how kids can get out of situations like if someone is pressuring them to try drugs,” he said. Spada is also a lacrosse coach, and some of his coaching experience spills into the course as well.

“I tell the kids, look at athletes; they hate to talk to the media, and whenever they’re asked questions they pretend to take a phone call,” he said. “I tell the kids they can do the same thing as a way to take themselves out of a situation they don’t want to be in.”

The firefighter said he also talks with parents about creating lines to use with their children if they need to be picked up from a party or place where they no longer feel comfortable. “You got to have a plan, just like going into a fire,” he said.

Aside from Spada’s presentation, he said he also brings a member of the Long Island Council on Alcoholism and Drug Dependence to speak with the kids, as well as a parent who has lost a child to a drug overdose, and Chris Jack, Huntington Bay police chief, to talk to the kids about the legal ramifications of drug use.

“This was kind of put together on a whim, but we’ve gotten a lot of positive feedback,” Jack said in a phone interview.

Jack said Spada approached him to get involved. “This is important, you see the headlines everyday,” Jack said. “As a cop, you get desensitized to a lot of things, but when you see 12- and 13-year-olds hooked on heroin, you never get desensitized to that.”

The police chief said he can see the look of shock in kid’s eyes when he explains to them all the effects drunk driving and drug abuse can have on their life, including how it effects their record, getting a job, applying for college and more. Spada said the cost of installing a Breathalyzer in a car and court fees helps scare the kids straight.

Huntington school district Superintendent Jim Polansky has attended the program and said he sees it as a valuable resource for students and parents alike, and appreciates all the work Spada and the fire department does.

“Community partnerships are important, particularly when it comes to such critical issues as drug awareness and prevention,” he said in an email. “The presentation is very direct and speaks to specific experiences that certain families and agencies have had with addiction. What it makes very clear is that the issue crosses demographics and neighborhoods; it can appear anywhere and often in situations where it is least expected. This can be eye-opening for some, but a very important message to convey.”

Polasnky also said he appreciates the course being offered on a continuous basis. “The messages cannot be shared enough,” he said.

Currently the program is held at the Halesite Fire Department, but Spada said community groups and schools have reached out to see if he could bring the program to them. The next two programs dates are set for Wednesday, Jan. 25, at the Halesite Fire Department at 7 p.m. and Wednesday, Feb. 1, at Huntington Manor Fire Department.

Young members of the Northport-East Northport Community Drug and Alcohol Task Force smile with their flag as they prepare to walk in a parade. Photo from Anthony Ferrandino

By Victoria Espinoza

The Northport-East Northport Community Drug and Alcohol Task Force received more than half a million dollars in a grant from the federal government to help further educate the youth in the community about the dangers of substance and alcohol abuse.

Anthony Ferrandino, co-chair of the task force, said the group has had their eyes on the Drug Free Communities grant for five years, and applied last year, so he was “ecstatic” to finally receive it.

The grant is part of the Drug Free Communities Support Program, a White House project that works to reduce youth substance use by promoting communitywide participation and evidence-based practices.

“The prescription drug abuse crisis on Long Island is symptomatic of the larger opioid epidemic that New York State and the entire country is facing, and we need to fight back now.” — Chuck Schumer

Ferrandino said the federal grant is extremely competitive, which makes him even prouder the task force was selected to receive it.

“I was so happy,” he said in a phone interview. “This is something I know Northport will benefit from.”

The task force worked with the Central Nassau Guidance & Counseling Services, a not-for-profit behavioral health safetynet organization, to help apply for, win and administer the funds. The task force will receive $125,000 per year for the next five years.

The not-for-profit will provide both administrative oversight in the future, as well as clinical and subject matter expertise on substance-use prevention and treatment.

Jeffrey Friedman, CEO of Central Nassau, and a Northport resident, said the grant helps ensure students will have a plethora of resources to help them deal with the increase in substance abuse throughout Suffolk County.

“This funding from the federal government infuses urgently needed financial resources to one of the strongest grassroots movements on Long Island — to save the lives of youth who are using drugs and alcohol, starting at very young ages,” he said in an email. “Even as heroin and prescription opioids are destroying L.I. families at unprecedented rates, this community-focused grant provides a new opportunity to break the cycle of abuse and ‘business as usual’ — and to spark community-level change.”

The federal grant enables the hiring of a full-time task force coalition leader, and supports a range of coordinated practices and evidence-supported activities aimed at prevention. The programs include parent-education, social media initiatives, pharmacist/youth collaboration and stricter law enforcement practices.

Ferrandino said the task force is currently interviewing candidates for the coalition leader position, and they want someone who can communicate and educate the community, run multiple subcommittees and manage the emotional aspects of the growing drug problem.

The co-chair said that when applying for the grant, the task force wanted to use the money to focus on two specific problems; underage drinking and prescription drug abuse.

New York legislators are proud of the progress the Northport-East Northport Community Drug and Alcohol Task Force has made.

“The prescription drug abuse crisis on Long Island is symptomatic of the larger opioid epidemic that New York State and the entire country is facing, and we need to fight back now,” U.S. Sen. Chuck Schumer (D) said in a statement. “These grant recipients have been on the front lines of combatting the disturbing drug abuse uptick among our Long Island youth and this investment will provide them with the resources they need to continue their lifesaving work.”

The task force was first created in 2006, and has designed programs to reach out to students in the Northport/East Northport community, including sponsoring a film premiere this year about drug abuse recovery, organizing Narcan training sessions, and more.

Suffolk County has statistically been one of the greatest areas of concern in New York for heroin and opioid deaths in recent years, according to the Centers for Disease Control. Suffolk County Police Commissioner Tim Sini said the county has had more than 100 opioid-related overdoses for several consecutive years.

The issue is not just in New York. According to the CDC, from 2005 to 2014, drug overdose deaths have risen by 144 percent to 2,300 deaths in New York, and 58 percent to 47,055 deaths in the nation.

Lit luminaires light up the night during the third annual Lights of Hope event in Port Jefferson on Aug. 31. Photo by Nora Milligan

It’s no time to pass the buck.

When it comes to the rising opioid abuse issue coursing through Long Island’s veins, we want to make sure we continue the open dialogue.

As you finish reading this edition, we hope you reflect on how this growing problem affects you, your family, your friends and everyone else around you — we can’t hide from this.

We need to take a more head-on approach to this medical issue, and accept that it is a medical problem, and not as some say a moral failing.

Parents shouldn’t let the stigma attached to drug or substance abuse keep them from talking about it. If we are to learn and grow and recover, we need to be talking. If we hide from the issue, the results will most certainly be fatal.

This is a problem that requires a collaborative effort, including prevention through education and early identification of at-risk people, enforcement with sharper penalties to dealers and prescription writers and improved rehabilitation resources and strategies. And as this issue should reflect, many groups on the North Shore are dedicated to working together to fight this crisis.

A cooperative combination of all of these things can help get Long Island headed in the right direction. Listed below are several resources if you or a loved one is struggling with substance or drug abuse.

• Suffolk County Substance Abuse Hotline: 631-979-1700

• Hope House Ministries: 631-978-0188

• Response of Suffolk County 24-hour hotline: 631-751-7500

• Prevention Resource Center: 631-650-0135

• Phoenix House’s Edward D. Miller substance abuse treatment center: 844-296-9046

• Samaritan Village’s Suffolk Outpatient Treatment Program: 631-351-7112

• St. Charles Hospital rehab program: 631-474-6233

• New York State HOPEline: 1-877-8-HOPENY

Suffolk County Division of Community Mental Hygiene Services: 631-853-8500

Visit http://www.suffolkcountyny.gov/substanceabuse for a downloadable prevention, treatment and recovery services directory, which gives a list of service agencies and treatment centers on Long Island.

File photo

This week’s issues of Times Beacon Record Newspapers are set up a little differently.

Suffolk County has one of the highest rates of death from heroin and opioid overdoses in New York State, and we feel this growing drug abuse problem deserves a special journalistic spotlight. So we dedicated this issue to looking at the different angles of approaching the heroin and opioid problem. In this week’s paper, you will find facts: How much the substance abuse trend has grown throughout the past few years; how our local communities, governments, police departments and residents have adapted to fight back against this movement; and reflections from recovering addicts and parents who have lost children to drug overdoses.

By Tracey Farrell

In 2002, my 16-year-old son Kevin had surgery on his shoulder for a football injury. He was prescribed 60 Vicodin pills with no other instructions but to take one or two of them every four to six hours for pain.

I didn’t know they weren’t like antibiotics, and you weren’t supposed to take all 60. He was still in pain, so they gave him 60 more. Well, guess who is now addicted to them? He was buying them during lunch.

This is the high school quarterback. His girlfriend is the cheerleading captain. He is beautiful, loving, fun and funny. His friends love him. His teachers and coaches love him. He has not an enemy in the world. He graduates. He works. He is a great kid.

Kevin chose to smoke pot instead of taking the pills soon after high school, but at some point he went back to the pills — especially since I was on him all of the time to stop smoking. He had multiple concussions over his high school football career. After his last one, I saw a change in his personality. He was easily angered, depressed, anxious — all things he was not before.

I didn’t know at the time that marijuana and opioids help make all of those symptoms so much better. The drugs make them disappear. I didn’t know that the only enemy he did have was the one within himself.

Tracey Farrell and her son Kevin Norris in 2010. Photo from Tracey Farrell
Tracey Farrell and her son Kevin Norris in 2010. Photo from Tracey Farrell

When Kevin went back to the pills, he began snorting them this time. A lot of them. Once I saw a powder residue on his glass desk and, only knowing what I saw on TV, I put it on my tongue to see if it would numb it.

Nope, not cocaine.

I knew deep down something was going on. He didn’t shower as often or take care of his teeth. Changes in his habits were starting to happen.

These Oxycodone pills are expensive, and make you painfully sick when you don’t have them. An addict becomes so desperate that they will beg, borrow and steal to get them — literally. Eventually when you have exhausted stealing your family’s available cash, you steal their jewelry, sports memorabilia and anything else of value you can sneak out of the house. You write bad checks from your mom’s bank account. Eventually you realize there’s an alternative available and you turn to heroin. It’s cheap, and readily available. You just have to put money in your mailbox and drugs appear moments later.

That point happened some time in 2011. I assume he started snorting it before he shot it.

Nine years in and I am still clueless, uneducated, unaware to so much of it. Kevin never, ever looked high in front of me. I was missing spoons, which are used to melt the heroin down to a soluble form, but I still thought maybe they were thrown out by mistake? Yes, he had been to rehab, but I didn’t know that it didn’t fix you. I didn’t know that me giving him no option but to enter rehab wouldn’t work. I didn’t know that he had to want to be in recovery.

I learned how to be manipulated. I enabled everything. I believed every lie he told me and would hand over money in fear he would be killed for the money he owed.

Eventually, he must leave the house. Kevin would live in his car, on which I was now making the payments and insuring. It’s winter and I cannot fathom the thought of him in a car at Christmas, so I get him an apartment. I sent his stepfather over many times to see if he was alive when I couldn’t get in touch with him. I even called 911 on him when I thought he was suicidal, which resulted in a short hospital hold. I started to understand that he does not want this for himself, but doesn’t know how to stop. He fears withdrawal, and I hear his pain and cries when he begs me for money because he is so sick. He is eventually hospitalized for a blood infection. I realize I can no longer keep him in that apartment.

I clean the place out.

He didn’t need much food. The only thing in the fridge was water. I find all the things he has used as a tourniquet. There is an amazing amount of plastic garbage bag drawstrings removed from bags, Q-tips everywhere with the cotton taken off which are used as filters. So many water bottle caps. So many syringes.

“There were times I threw money into his car so angrily when he asked me. I struggled between loving him and hating him.”

I didn’t want my son to die, but I’m realizing I’m making it more comfortable for him.

Through most of his addiction he was highly functioning, always holding down a job. This was no longer the case.

He gets out of the hospital and is back to his car. I’m giving him $20 a day. He gets food stamps and Medicaid from the Department of Social Services. I find he sells what’s on his food stamp card. I pump gas in his car, but I do not hand over more cash. There were times I threw money in his car so angrily at him when he asked.

I struggled between loving him and hating him.

He began living in a hotel with his dealer and got arrested for possession of a syringe. He’s assigned a public defender, but of course Mom pays the fees and it’s knocked down.

But a few days prior, he made the choice on his own — which is key — to seek help.

He made the calls on his own, instead of me doing all of the legwork, to enter South Oaks Hospital in Amityville. His third try at rehab. But now, he wants it.

I went to a family meeting about 10 days in.

There he is. My son, my real son. Thank you, thank you and thank you.

He was enrolled in a 28-day program. He went to Mainstream House in Riverhead, a sober house. We do family things together again. We shop, we go to lunch, dinner. He wanted to be around us again. I haven’t had this in years. We laugh, we cry.

He got kicked out of sober living for having Ambien, a prescription drug, because he had a hard time sleeping. I let him back home. Kevin has a new job, a new girlfriend. He seems happy.

Tracey Farrell, a Rocky Point resident and founder of North Shore Drug Awareness Advocates, displays her luminaire in memory of her son Kevin during the third annual Lights of Hope event in Port Jefferson on Aug. 31. Photo by Nora Milligan
Tracey Farrell, a Rocky Point resident and founder of North Shore Drug Awareness Advocates, displays her luminaire in memory of her son Kevin Norris during the third annual Lights of Hope event in Port Jefferson on Aug. 31. Photo by Nora Milligan

I didn’t go to the classes I should have. I didn’t learn that someone new to recovery does not want their past thrown at them. One day at a time is their mantra. Yesterday is the past. He’s going to his meetings on a regular basis, but now that he is working, that starts to not be as often. Anything that goes missing I automatically accuse him. He wants a new phone because his is old and cracked. I bought him a new one and he “lost” it. I still tell him that if he didn’t sell it he would have it. He tells me he is working an honest program and that he has told me everything — including that he did not sell the phone. I apologize and tell him I am proud of him.

Kevin is working for a company which does party rentals.

One Sunday, in September 2012, he came home looking tired. He was thrilled that they gave him a $100 tip. They even gave him the leftover cake, which we of course ate together. We spoke of the cotton candy on his sneakers, because he worked the cotton candy machine. He thought it was fun.

The next day, his sister found him dead in bed. It was an accidental overdose.

They say money is a trigger.

I will never know what led him back. I know now I didn’t cause it. I couldn’t control it and I couldn’t cure it. I prepared myself that this day could come, but I thought he was in the clear. Our very last conversation was about cotton candy, one of the things I craved most when I was pregnant with him.

I still have the cotton-candy-covered shoe laces. I miss him every day. I still struggle with not doing the things I now know I should have done, and I try to teach people every day to not make the same mistakes I did. Learn from me please. Let me tell you anything and everything that may help you or your loved one. It helps me to help you.

I just went to a celebration meeting of one of his best friends celebrating one year of sobriety on Sunday, and he said, “I think he may have died so I can live.”

Tracey Farrell, formerly Tracey Budd, is a Rocky Point resident who, since her son’s passing, educates others on drug abuse and assists in finding help for those who are struggling, or know someone who is struggling, with addiction. She is the founder of North Shore Drug Awareness Advocates and also a 2015 TBR Person of the Year.

Nazi material, along with weapons were seized from a home in Mount Sinai last June. File photo from the SCPD

Police are seeking the public’s help with information after Nazi paraphernalia and a bomb-making manual were found during a raid in Mount Sinai early Thursday.

At 6 a.m. on Miller Place Middle Island Road, just before it merges into Mt. Sinai-Coram Road and Miller Place Road, brothers Edward and Sean Perkowski were arrested after authorities executing a search warrant uncovered 10 assault rifles, a hand gun, high capacity magazines, a shotgun, a stun gun, more than $40,000 in cash, marijuana, illegal mushrooms, Nazi material and a manual on how to make bomb. The Nazi-related material included framed photos of Adolf Hitler, Nazi flags with swastikas and books on white supremacy.

Ten assault rifles, a hand gun, high capacity magazines, a shotgun and a stun gun were retrieved from a home in Mount Sinia. Photo from SCPD
Ten assault rifles, a hand gun, high capacity magazines, a shotgun and a stun gun were retrieved from a home in Mount Sinai. Photo from SCPD
Edward Perkowski mugshot from SCPD
Edward Perkowski mugshot from SCPD

Edward Perkowski, 29, currently faces drugs and weapon charges, and Sean, 25, was charged with an outstanding warrant.

“This was a public threat on multiple fronts,” Suffolk County Police Commissioner Tim Sini said. “We have two individuals who clearly subscribe to a hateful, violent ideology, who had an illegal arsenal at their fingertips.”

Although unable to discuss the details of the case as the investigation is still ongoing, such as if an event to use the arsenal of weapons was planned, whether they’ve been cooperative or if they were working alone or as part of a group, Sini said the department is currently working with the Joint Terrorism Task Force, which is made up of local police department and federal agencies, including the FBI and the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives.

“Today’s search warrant might have prevented a deadly, violent incident, like the one we recently saw in Orlando,” Sini said. “I have a message to the residents of Suffolk County: The Suffolk County Police Department will do everything in its power to ensure your safety. We can only do our job most effectively if we have your cooperation and your collaboration.”

A large binder containing hand-written and printout material on bomb building was found during the search warrant in Mount Sinai. Photo by Desirée Keegan
A large binder containing hand-written and printout material on bomb building was found during the search warrant in Mount Sinai. Photo by Desirée Keegan

Brookhaven Town Supervisor Ed Romaine (R) said he’s never seen such coordinated police activity in all his years as an elected official, in regard to going after drug dealers and those promoting hate. He said the latter is what is of the utmost importance in this given case.

“Obviously this was a drug house, but drugs were only part of the problem,” he said. “This was a house infected with that disease called hate, and we want to stop hate in this country. There’s enough of it, and we’ve seen what hate can do and how it can destroy and hurt our nation.”

John Leonard, a neighbor who has lived two houses down for 18 years, said there was a brawl out in front of the home a couple of months ago, and 911 was called. When he saw the public police report following the search warrant, he went to police headquarters to offer his help.

“I’ve never spoke to them, we keep our distance,” he said. “There’s four or five cars parked in front [of the house] at all times and constant cars coming in and out. I had my car broken into in the driveway about a year ago. My neighbors had the same thing. We found prescription medication laying out in the street a couple of months ago. It wasn’t too hard to figure out something is going on.”

What he said horrified him, though, was the large bomb-making manual found, which included hand-written and printed out material.

“That scares the hell out of me,” he said. “That takes it to a whole new level.”

Sini also said he is concerned.

“To think that this was in the Town of Brookhaven is extremely disturbing and the police department, the brave men and women of this department, will stop at nothing to neutralize threats like this,” he said.

Nazi and drug-related reading material were found inside a home in Mount Sinai. Photo from SCPD
Nazi and drug-related reading material were found inside a home in Mount Sinai. Photo from SCPD

While Sini cannot say what pointed the department in the direction of the home, the commissioner explained it took time to get probable cause to establish a case, and tips from residents have been instrumental in much of the police’s recent findings. He said more than 600 tips on drug homes and drug spots in local communities have come through the 631-852-NARC hotline, which Legislator Sarah Anker (D-Mount Sinai) was instrumental in launching.

“We need to use our most vital resource, and that is the residents of Suffolk County,” Anker said. “We need to have a safer environment, but we need that information from the public.”

To report any information regarding the suspects from the Mount Sinai case, call 800-220-TIPS.

“We took two dangerous individuals off the street and we’ll fully investigate and prosecute this case,” Sini said. “We’ll spare no cost and no time. The fact that this is in our backyard is very concerning. That’s why the message today is to the public. Regarding criminal activity, please call the tips hotline or 911 immediately.”

Did you see the news

On June 12, a 24-year-old man from Huntington Station was arrested at Andrea’s 25, a restaurant on Route 25 in Commack, after police said he stole more than 100 copies of Newsday throughout the course of three months. He was charged with four counts of petit larceny.

Over exposed

A 43-year-old man from Riverhead was arrested on June 12 after police said he exposed himself at the Smith Haven Mall in Lake Grove. He was charged with lewdness for exposing his body in public.

How’s it hanging

Police said a 20-year-old man from Inwood was hanging from a water pipe inside Hypnosis 8.0, a nightclub on East Main Street in Smithtown on June 12, and caused water damage inside the business. He was arrested and charged with criminal mischief with reckless property damage.

Apartment swiper

A 30-year-old man from Smithtown was arrested on June 11 after police said he entered an apartment in Kings Park and stole a laptop and a television, then drove a 1996 Ford Sedan with a suspended license west bound on Motor Parkway in Hauppauge. He was charged with second-degree burglary and second-degree aggravated unlicensed operation of a motor vehicle.

Leggo my Legos

On June 11, a 26-year-old man from Smithtown was arrested after police said he stole multiple Lego sets from stores on Middle Country Road and Veterans Highway in Commack. He was charged with two counts of petit larceny.

All for some detergent pods

Police said a 27-year-old man from Miller Place stole detergent pods from ShopRite on Garrett Place in Commack on June 11. He was arrested and charged with petit larceny.

Knock knock

A 31-year-old woman from Kings Park was arrested on June 10 after police said she kicked in the front door of a residence on Commack Road and entered without consent. She was charged with criminal mischief intent with intent to damage property.

Caught with cocaine

On June 10, a 30-year-old man from Islandia was arrested after police said he was in possession of a clear glass pipe with cocaine residue in it while on Veterans Memorial Highway. He was charged with seventh-degree criminal possession of a controlled substance.

Weed is whack

A 19-year-old man from Kings Park was arrested on June 10 after police said he had marijuana in his possession while in a 2015 Nissan on Indian Head Road in Kings Park. He was charged with unlawful possession of marijuana.

Tool stealing tools

On June 9, a 34-year-old man from Deluca was arrested after police said he stole tools from Pep Boys Auto Parts & Car Repair on Middle Country Road in St. James. He was charged with petit larceny.

His future is sealed

Police said a 43-year-old man from Farmingville refused to listen to officers who told him to freeze after attempting to arrest him for stealing three envelopes filled with cash from a business on Middle Country Road, on June 9. After he was caught, he struggled with officers and tried to resist arrest. He was charged with fourth-degree grand larceny and resisting arrest.

Razor rift

Police said an unknown person stole two Razor Scooters from a residence on Washington Avenue in St. James on June 12.

Picking a fight with police

A 23-year-old man from Coram screamed at and made threatening movements and gestures toward multiple police officers during an incident at about 1 a.m. on June 12 on North Street in Mount Sinai, according to police. He was arrested and charged with disorderly conduct for violent behavior.

Hello, officer, my name is John Doe

At Sylvan Avenue Park in Miller Place at about 8 p.m. on June 9, a 23-year-old man from Holtsville possessed heroin and hypodermic syringes, police said. When questioned by police, he provided a false identity and birthdate to avoid arrest for violating his parole, according to police. He was arrested and charged with seventh-degree criminal possession of a controlled substance and false impersonation.

Gun and drug charges

On June 9 at about 2 a.m., a 23-year-old man from Mastic Beach was found to possess a loaded 9-mm semiautomatic handgun without a permit outside of a home on North Washington Avenue in Centereach, police said. He was also in possession of cocaine, according to police. He was arrested and charged with second-degree and third-degree criminal possession of a weapon and fourth-degree possession of a narcotic.

No one wants to see that

A 61-year-old man from Port Jefferson Station exposed himself in the woods near a public park on Route 25 in Selden at about 3 p.m. on June 4, and again while seated in a Nissan Sentra in the parking lot of People’s United Bank on Route 112 in Coram at about 7 p.m. on June 9, according to police. He was arrested on June 9 and charged with public lewdness and exposing his body in public.

Liar, liar

Near Sam’s Club on Horseblock Road in Medford at about 9 a.m. on May 20, a 47-year-old woman from Mastic Beach filed a police report stating her 1996 Toyota had been stolen, according to police. She was arrested on June 10 when it was discovered that her car was on the side of Horseblock Road in Medford and she knew that was where it was, yet still filed the false report, police said.

Toothbrush bandit

On six occasions in 2016 — at CVS Pharmacy on West Main Street in Smithtown, CVS Pharmacy on West Jericho Turnpike in Huntington Station and CVS Pharmacy on West Main Street in East Islip — a 36-year-old homeless man stole multiple electronic toothbrushes, according to police. He was arrested on June 9 and charged with six counts of petit larceny.

Dump truck driver dumps license

A 32-year-old man from Port Jefferson Station was driving a Ford dump truck on Oakmont Avenue in Selden at about 1:30 p.m. on June 9 when he was pulled over, police said. They discovered he was driving with a suspended license. He was arrested and charged with second-degree aggravated unlicensed operation of a motor vehicle. His license had been suspended 10 times prior to the arrest, according to police.

Front runner

On June 8 at about 2 p.m., a 30-year-old man from Ronkonkoma stole two New York Yankees jerseys and one New York Giants jersey from Bob’s Stores at College Plaza in Selden, police said. He was arrested and charged with petit larceny.

Pills pilfered

At a home on Overton Street in Sayville, a 47-year-old woman stole various prescription pills on June 2, according to police. She was arrested on June 10 in Selden and charged with petit larceny.

Pizza parlor patron’s passport pick-pocketed

Cash and a passport were stolen from a 2008 Chevrolet parked outside of Port Jeff Pizza on Main Street in Port Jefferson at about 9 p.m. on June 11, according to police.

Missing mailbox

A mailbox was stolen from outside a home on Sheep Pasture Road in Setauket at about 8 p.m. on June 11, police said.

Covert operation

Headphones for the video game Call of Duty on the Playstation 4 system were stolen from Walmart on Nesconset Highway in Setauket on June 12, according to police.

Shoplifting at Kohl’s

Clothing, four picture frames and three necklaces were stolen from Kohl’s on Nesconset Highway in Setauket at about 1:30 p.m. on June 12, according to police.

Knife-y situation

A 45-year-old man from Huntington Station was arrested on June 13 after police said he held someone up in Manor Park in Huntington Station with a knife and stole their black wallet with a credit card and cash inside. He was charged with first-degree robbery with use of a dangerous instrument.

In need(le) of some help

On June 13, a 32-year-old man from North Massapequa was arrested on Hauppauge Road in Commack after police said he had a hypodermic needle in his possession. He was charged with possession of a hypodermic instrument.

Hit and run

Police said a 20-year-old man from Dix Hills struck the rear passenger side door of a 2008 Lexus and fled while driving his 1996 Mercedes Benz on Bagatelle Road in Dix Hills on June 13. He was charged with leaving the scene with property damage.

It’s clear to all

A 29-year-old woman from Huntington was arrested on June 12 after police said she had a clear bag of marijuana in her possession while on Milton Place in Huntington. She was charged with unlawful possession of marijuana.

Weed on wheels

On June 10, a 19-year-old man from Huntington Station was arrested after police said he had marijuana in his possession while inside a 2004 Honda Accord on East 2nd Street in Huntington Station. He was charged with fifth-degree criminal possession of marijuana.

Hide your bike

On June 9, a 19-year-old man from Huntington Station was arrested after police said he was in possession of a stolen 2008 Yamaha mini bike while on Old Country Road. He was charged with fifth-degree criminal possession of stolen property.

Not egg-zactly legal

Police said a 41-year-old man from Huntington Station threw an egg at a residence at 2 a.m. on Broadway in Greenlawn on June 10. He was arrested and charged with second-degree harassment with physical contact.

Heroin hand out

A 26-year-old man from Dix Hills was arrested on June 10 after police said he was selling narcotics, including heroin, on Dix Hills Drive in Melville. He was charged with third-degree criminal selling of a controlled substance narcotics.

Shady situation

Police said a 24-year-old woman from Centerport stole Ray Ban and Wildfox sunglasses from Lord & Taylor on Walt Whitman Road in Huntington on June 10. She was arrested and charged with petit larceny.

iDon’t think you can do that

On June 10, a 46-year-old man from Smithtown was arrested after police said he stole an iPhone 5S and an iPhone 6 Plus from Target on Veterans Memorial Highway in Commack. He was charged with two counts of petit larceny.

No king in King Kullen

A 29-year-old woman from Huntington Station was arrested on June 10 after police said she stole various grocery items from King Kullen on West Jericho Turnpike in Huntington Station. She was charged with petit larceny.

You can’t have that Yamaha

A 16-year-old man from Huntington Station was arrested on June 9 after police said he was in possession of a stolen Yamaha ATV while on Park Avenue in Huntington. He was charged with fourth-degree criminal possession of stolen property valuing more than $1,000.

Shouldn’t be that EZ

A 27-year-old man from Port Jefferson Station stole several diamond rings from a display case at EZ Cash Pawn & Jewelry on Brentwood Road in Brentwood at about 2 p.m. on June 3, police said. He was arrested at about 8 p.m. in Port Jefferson Station and charged with third-degree grand larceny.

Drill-bit taker

On April 30 at about 10 a.m., a 36-year-old man from Port Jefferson Station took a Milwaukee hammer drill and a Klein Tools auger bit from a home on North Country Road in Miller Place, according to police. He was arrested on June 3 in Miller Place and charged with petit larceny.

Bulls-eye

At Target on Pond Path in South Setauket at about 8 p.m. on June 3, a 39-year-old man from Medford stole 96 items, police said. He was arrested and charged with petit larceny.

Who needs a license?

A 51-year-old man from Mount Sinai was driving a 2015 Ford on Nesconset Highway at about 4 p.m. on June 2 when he was pulled over, according to police. He was driving with a suspended license. He was arrested and charged with first-degree aggravated unlicensed operation of a motor vehicle. Police said his license was revoked on 11 other occasions.

Money laundry

On March 8 at about 7:30 p.m., a 34-year-old woman from Farmingville stole a wallet containing cash from a table at Fun Wash Coin Laundries on Middle Country Road in Centereach, according to police. She was arrested on June 5 in Selden and charged with petit larceny.

Hit-and-run

At about midnight on June 3, a 29-year-old man from Coram was driving a 2010 Toyota on Route 112 in Coram when he hit a pedestrian and did not stop, police said. He was later arrested in Selden and found to be driving without a required interlock device, which prevents drunk driving. He was charged with leaving the scene of an incident causing serious injury and use of a vehicle without an interlock device.

Heroin Hyundai

A 21-year-old man from Selden who possessed heroin was in the driver’s seat of a 2003 Hyundai near the corner of Magnolia Drive and Pine Street in Selden at about 4 p.m. on June 2, according to police. He was arrested and charged with seventh-degree criminal possession of a controlled substance.

Brand new car bashed

On North Titmus Drive in Mastic on May 27 at about 6:30 p.m., a 50-year-old man driving a 2003 Toyota crashed into a 2016 Ford and left the scene without stopping, according to police. He was arrested and charged with leaving the scene of an incident with property damage.

Should have gone for Blu-ray

At about 10 p.m. on May 12, a 29-year-old woman from East Moriches stole DVDs, a DVD player and assorted makeup from Kmart on North Ocean Avenue in Farmingville, police said. She was arrested on June 1 in Selden and charged with petit larceny.

Caught red-handed

A 19-year-old man from Mastic Beach was in possession of a 2004 Honda all-terrain vehicle that had previously been reported stolen at about 7 p.m. on June 1 from a home on Judith Drive in Coram, according to police. He was arrested and charged with fourth-degree criminal possession of stolen property.

Greedy beaver

An employee at Eager Beaver Car Wash on Route 347 in Port Jefferson Station stole more than $3,000 in cash from the business between Sept. 17 and April 8, police said. The 24-year-old woman from Mount Sinai was arrested in Selden on June 1 and charged with third-degree grand larceny.

Surprised it still runs

Someone stole a 1991 Toyota from the driveway of a home on Ruland Road in Selden at about midnight on June 5, according to police.

Fresh paint job

A 2003 Chevrolet was spray-painted by an unknown person while it was parked in the road in front of a home on Balin Avenue in Centereach at about 12:30 a.m. on June 5, police said.

Residents weep over stolen tree

A weeping sequoia tree was stolen from the property of a home on Chelsea Drive in Mount Sinai at about 2 p.m. on June 5, according to police.

Rise and shine and high

A 26-year-old woman from Nesconset was arrested on June 4 after police said she had heroin on her while on Roosevelt Avenue in Ronkonkoma at 10:25 a.m. She was charged with seventh-degree criminal possession of a controlled substance.

Charged for not charging

On June 2, a 19-year-old man from Brentwood was arrested after police said he failed to charge customers for various items while working at Walmart on Crooked Hill Road in Commack. He was charged with three counts of petit larceny.

Lotion theft

Police said a 71-year-old man from Dix Hills stole tanning lotion from Kohl’s on Crooked Hill Road in Commack on June 2. He was arrested and charged with petit larceny.

Not the right time for a shot

A 24-year-old man from Smithtown was arrested on June 1 after police said he shot a BB gun at a house on Carmel Road in Commack. He was charged with second-degree reckless endangerment.

Far from a king

On June 1, a 41-year-old man from Lake Ronkonkoma was arrested after police said he stole property from King Kullen on Ronkonkoma Avenue and had Suboxone in his possession. He was charged with seventh-degree criminal possession of a controlled substance and petit larceny.

I think he skipped a step

Police said a 45-year-old man from Brentwood placed items in a shopping cart while at Walmart on Veterans Highway in Islandia on April 10 and walked out of the store without paying. He was arrested at the 4th Precinct on May 31 and charged with petit larceny.

CVS fans

A 24-year-old woman from Lake Ronkonkoma was arrested on May 31 at the 4th Precinct, after police said she stole markers and glue from CVS Pharmacy in Nesconset on April 19, and then stole miscellaneous items from a CVS Pharmacy on Middle Country Road in Selden. She was charged with two counts of petit larceny.

On May 31, a 28-year-old man from Nesconset was arrested after police said he stole miscellaneous items from CVS Pharmacy in Selden and had a warrant out for him for a probation violation. He was charged with petit larceny.

Nightmare on Elm Street

Police said a 25-year-old man from Hauppauge stole a wallet from an unlocked vehicle parked on Elm Street in Commack on May 31. He was arrested and charged with fourth-degree grand larceny.

Crooked thief on Crooked Hill

On May 30, a 29-year-old man from Babylon was arrested after police said he stole clothing from Kohl’s on Crooked Hill Road in Commack. He was charged with fourth-degree grand larceny.

You’ve got no mail (box)

Police said an unknown person damaged a mailbox at a residence on Pine Avenue in Ronkonkoma on June 3.

Sad shed

On May 29, an unknown person stole a generator and a leaf blower from a shed at a residential property on Florida Avenue in Commack, according to police.

In danger of paper cuts

An unknown person entered a building on Motor Parkway in Hauppauge on June 4 and tossed papers around, police said.

Santa in the off-season?

Police said two unknown men and two unknown women entered a Banana Republic in the Smith Haven Mall in Lake Grove on April 10 and stole $2,900 worth of men’s clothing. According to police, one of the men is elderly with white hair, a white beard and a white mustache.

Drugs in Miller Place
On May 27 at about 6 p.m., a 37-year-old man from Miller Place seated in a 2009 Acura on Tyler Avenue possessed heroin, police said. He was arrested and charged with seventh-degree criminal possession of a controlled substance. At the same location and time, a 46-year-old man from Middle Island possessed heroin and two different medications without prescriptions, according to police. He was arrested as well and charged with fourth-degree possession of a narcotic drug and two counts of seventh-degree criminal possession of a controlled substance.

Cannabusted
At a home on Stanley Drive in Centereach, a 24-year-old man was found to possess cannabis at about 9 p.m. on May 25, according to police. He was arrested and charged with seventh-degree criminal possession of a controlled substance.

How did those get in there?
A 34-year-old man from Wappenger Falls was found in possession of multiple bags of heroin at the 6th Precinct while being arrested on an unrelated charge stemming from an incident on Horseblock Road in Selden at about 10:30 p.m. on May 28, police said. He was charged with seventh-degree criminal possession of a controlled substance.

Garden-variety criminal
A statue and decorative planters were stolen from the front yard of a home on Christian Avenue in Stony Brook at about noon on May 14, police said.

Back to work
Between November 2011 and December 2013, a 30-year-old man from Selden collected unemployment fraudulently, according to police. He was arrested at a home on Paula Boulevard at about 10:30 a.m. on May 27 and charged with fourth-degree insurance fraud.

Dirty job
On May 26 at the Walgreens on Route 112 in Medford, a 44-year-old man from Middle Island stole three bottles of Clorox bleach and a bottle of Tide laundry detergent, police said. He was arrested and charged with petit larceny.

Ruthless robbery
A 21-year-old man from Ronkonkoma approached a woman near the Walgreens on Route 25 in Selden at about 10 p.m. on May 26 and forcefully demanded money from her, according to police. He was arrested and charged with first-degree robbery.

Empty your pockets
While at the 6th Precinct at about noon on May 25 after he was arrested in Selden, a 27-year-old man from Rocky Point was found to possess the drug methadone, police said. He was charged with seventh-degree criminal possession of a controlled substance.

Bike rides off
At about 12:30 p.m. on May 29, someone stole a black and white BMX bike from a home on Olympia Street in Port Jefferson Station, police said.

Cable repairman?
Someone tried to exit the Walmart on Nesconset Highway in Setauket without paying for a television and a pair of pliers at about 2:30 p.m. on May 29, according to police.

Know your parole
A 32-year-old man from Coram was in violation of his parole at about 2 a.m. on May 29, according to police. He was on Main Street in Port Jefferson when he was arrested and charged with the parole violation.

Rock-throwing spree
The rear passenger side window of a 2012 Jeep parked near a home on Avondale Drive in Centereach was smashed by someone at about 8 p.m. on May 27. On nearby Salem Road about 30 minutes later, the rear window of a 2006 Toyota was smashed and a rock was thrown through the driver side window of a 1997 Honda, according to police.

Missing drugs from CVS
Various over-the-counter medications were stolen from the CVS Pharmacy on Middle Country Road in Selden at about 1:30 p.m. on May 28, according to police.

It’s a fixer-upper
Household items were stolen from the Walmart on Nesconset Highway in Setauket at about 2 p.m. on May 28, police said.

Mishaps at Macy’s
A 29-year-old female from Ronkonkoma was arrested on May 29 at 1:10 p.m. after police said she stole merchandise from Macy’s in the Smith Haven Mall in Lake Grove, and had cocaine in her possession. She was charged with fourth-degree grand larceny valuing more than $1,000 and seventh-degree criminal possession of a controlled substance.
On May 28 a 20-year-old man from Riverhead was arrested after police said he stole belts and shorts from Macy’s in the Smith Haven Mall in Lake Grove. He was charged with petit larceny.

Movie lover
A 57-year-old man from Hauppauge was arrested on May 29 at The Smithtown Library on Smithtown Boulevard after police said he stole movies. He was charged with petit larceny.

Stay sharp
Police said a 20-year-old man from Ronkonkoma threatened a group of people with a knife at the handball courts in Lake Ronkonkoma County Park on May 29, and then an hour later threatened a man with a knife standing outside his house on Smithtown Boulevard. He was arrested and charged with second-degree menacing with a weapon.

Gulf strike
A 23-year-old man from Ronkonkoma was arrested on May 28 after police said he stole money from a Gulf gas station on Express Drive North in Islandia, where he was employed. He was charged with petit larceny.

Takes one to steal some
Police said a 50-year-old man from Ronkonkoma was arrested after police said he stole various tools from a shed on a residence on Oakside Drive in Smithtown on April 30. On May 27 he was arrested at the 4th Precinct, and charged with petit larceny.

Not Kohl
On May 27, a 42-year-old man from Brentwood was arrested after police said he stole clothing from Kohl’s on Crooked Hill Road in Commack on multiple occasions. He was charged with two counts of petit larceny.

Adder-don’t
Police said a 30-year-old man from Smithtown had Adderall on him without a prescription while on East Main Street in Kings Park on May 26. He was arrested and charged with seventh-degree criminal possession of a controlled substance.

Pocketing piping
A 27-year-old woman from Wyandanch was arrested on May 25, after police said she stole copper piping from a residence on Woodcut Drive in Mastic Beach. She was charged with third-degree burglary with illegal entry.

Car dramas
Police said an unknown person dented a 2011 Mini Cooper parked on Crescent Place in Smithtown on May 29.
On May 29, an unknown person damaged a 2012 Chevy that was parked on 5th Street in Lake Ronkonkoma.
One tire was stolen from a 2016 Honda parked on Gibbs Pond Road in Nesconset on May 29, police said.

Walmart woes
On May 29, police said an unknown person sole cellphone cases, a drill and DVDs from Walmart in the Smith Haven Mall in Lake Grove.

Dave and bust in
A 2012 Nissan Maxima parked in the parking lot of Dave & Buster’s on Veterans Memorial Highway in Islandia was broken into and a purse stolen from inside on May 28, police said.

Whole wallet gone
Police said an unknown person stole a wallet out of a shopping cart at Whole Foods Market on New Moriches Road in Lake Grove on May 28.

Cocaine couple
On May 29, a 21-year-old man and a 46-year-old man, both from Huntington Station, were arrested after police said they had cocaine on them while on New York Avenue in Huntington at about 2:30 a.m. They were both charged with seventh-degree criminal possession of a controlled substance.

Shine some light on the crime
An unknown person shattered the rear window of a 2011 Honda CR-V parked on the corner of Lantern Street in Greenlawn on May 29.

Can’t party here
A 34-year-old man from Huntington Station was arrested on May 27 after police said he permitted patrons to consume alcohol on the premises at Hola Centro America Grocery on New York Avenue in Huntington Station. He was charged with violation of a special license consumption on premises.

The plastics
Police said a 24-year-old man from Huntington Station had three plastic bags filled with marijuana while on Depot Road in Huntington Station at 3:45 p.m. on May 26. He was arrested and charged with fifth-degree criminal possession of marijuana.

CVS sees things
Police said a 30-year-old man from Commack stole more than $1,000 from CVS on Commack Road while working there as an employee. He was arrested on May 27 and charged with fourth-degree grand larceny.

Not a safe environment for a baby
A 28-year-old man from Huntington Station was arrested on May 27 after police said he had multiple rounds of ammunition, loaded guns and cocaine in his home on 7th Avenue with a baby in the house. He was arrested and charged with seventh-degree criminal possession of a controlled substance, second-degree criminal use of drug paraphernalia, third-degree criminal possession of a weapon, acting in a manor likely to be injurious to the welfare of a child and third-degree possession of narcotic drugs with the intent to sell.

Not exactly on a straight path
On May 27, a 20-year-old woman from Lindenhurst was arrested after police said she had prescription pills on her without a prescription while on Straight Path in Dix Hills at 11:50 a.m. She was arrested and charged with seventh-degree criminal possession of a controlled substance.

Louis on the loose
A 19-year-old man from Melville was arrested on May 26 after police said he stole a Louis Vuitton wallet containing cash and credit cards while at the Walt Whitman Mall in Huntington. He was charged with fourth-degree grand larceny.

West Pulaski Road story
On May 26, a 22-year-old man from Huntington Station was arrested after police said he had a quantity of cocaine in his possession while at a residence on West Pulaski Road in Greenlawn. He was charged with seventh-degree criminal possession of a controlled substance.

An apple a day takes the car away
Police said an unknown person stole a 2011 Ford Focus from the parking lot of Applebee’s on Walt Whitman Road in Huntington on May 29.

Thief conductors a search
On May 29, at the Huntington Station train stop for the Long Island Rail Road, an unknown person approached a woman, grabbed her and took her backpack with cash and medication in it.

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