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By Serena Carpino

The Setalcott Nation held its annual Corn Festival Powwow on the grounds of the Setauket Elementary School on July 13 and 14.

After a rainy start Saturday morning, the two-day event included storytelling as well as performances from indigenous dancers and drummers. In addition, eventgoers heard speeches from Setalcott Nation chairwoman Helen Sells and tribal members Chiitra Wells and Monique Fitzgerald. 

According to Sells, a graduate of Setauket Elementary School, the powwow is a celebration of Setalcott history.

“We started this 18 years ago and decided that we would try to keep this going because of the history,” she said. “Because history, if you don’t keep it going, gets lost.”

The tribe has successfully kept the tradition alive, with most of the vendors at the event having participated for the last 18 years. 

This celebration has brought some Setalcott members back to their roots, while it has allowed others to connect to their roots in a way they have never done before.

Robin Murdock, a retired Army veteran of 22 years, came back to his former community for the first time in 30 years to attend the event. Although this was his first time present, Murdock explained that the tradition “signifies how we come back together and show community. It’s important for how we pass on the culture, and let people know that we are still here. It’s a time for the kids to see what their ancestors have done and to hopefully carry that on.”

Sells explained that the original deed to transfer ownership by the Setalcott tribe of their land — that became the future Town of Brookhaven — to the British was signed on April 14, 1655. 

The land on which American Legion Irving Hart Post 1766 stands, located on Christian Avenue in Setauket, was given to the American Legion by Sells’ grandmother, who wanted to honor her brother, a veteran of both world wars.

“That’s why it’s called Irving Hart American Legion,” Sells, whose full name is Helen “Hart of the Morning Star” Sells, explained. 

Setalcott Nation’s close community and familial ties also reflect the tribe’s core beliefs.

“We value life and family,” Murdock said. “We cherish our history. We are people of courage, and we try to stand for the right things. Those are our [peoples’] values.”

The Town of Smithtown Department of Environment and Waterways and Municipal Services Facility collected over 14.42 tons of hazardous household waste at the free disposal event this past weekend. On Saturday, July 14, 416 households within the Township endured rainy conditions to safely dispose of thousands of pounds of toxic items, which are prohibited in regular curbside waste pickups.

“These events have become a staple on the calendar year, for residents who take great pride in protecting our environment by responsibly disposing of potentially hazardous chemicals and products from the household. By participating in the tri-annual event, we protect our drinking water, air and natural resources while maintaining the high quality parks, recreational facilities, roads and waterways for all residents to enjoy. Our long term hope is that current and future generations residents will use these events as inspiration to consider using safer and environmentally friendly alternatives around the home,” said Supervisor Edward R. Wehrheim.
Smithtown Municipal Services Facility employees worked in conjunction with MSF staff, Public Safety Fire Marshalls, DEW staff and Reworld (formerly known as Covanta) staff supplementing the work by Radiac, the Hazardous Household Waste contractor. The event to provide a safe and efficient service to residents was spearheaded under the direction of Environmental Director David Barnes, Sanitation Supervisor Neal Sheehan and Solid Waste Coordinator Mike Engelmann.
“The rain couldn’t stop our team or our environmentally conscious residents in safely disposing of 28,840 pounds of waste, without the risk of those materials contacting the environment. The turnout was a big increase from last year’s Summer event with over a 15% increase in resident participation, which is essential as we continue to keep Smithtown beautiful,” added David Barnes, Environmental Protection Director.
A portion of the wastes collected for manifested disposal include: mercury, waste oil based paints/ flammable paints, gasoline, paint thinners, waste gases, petroleum distillates, flammable solids, oxidizers liquids and solids, sodium/potassium nitrates, acids, corrosives, pesticides, herbicides, fertilizers, misc. toxic liquids (i.e. Chlordane, etc.) and solids, lacquers, lithium batteries, battery acids and various other toxic compounds.
Reworld (formerly known as Covanta) provided $5 Home Depot gift cards to over 80 residents for recycling potentially dangerous lithium-ion and other batteries, propane tanks and mercury containing devices thereby preventing these harmful items from curbside disposal. Reusable bags were also provided to interested residents.
The next Household Hazardous Waste collection event is scheduled for October 5th, 2024. Hazardous Household Waste collection events are for Smithtown Township residents only. Proof of residency will be confirmed upon entry.
DID YOU KNOW?:
  • Bicycle Upcycle: Residents can now upcycle bicycles at Municipal Services Facility (MSF) which are restored and distributed through Smithtown Bicycle Co-op, a 501(c)3 nonprofit organization located at FlowerField (Unit 18) in St James. The organization fixes up and provides free bikes, classes and access to repair tools, promoting health, safety, education & the concept of “paying it forward” through Recycling, Education and Community. Residents can drop off used bicycles free of charge at MSF during regular hours.
  • Electronic Waste: Residents can also dispose of electronic waste, free of charge, at the Town Recycling Center located at 85 Old Northport Road. Electronic waste, such as computers, printers, TV’s, monitors, automotive and household batteries, can be dropped off during regular hours for proper recycling.
  • FREE MULCH: Mulch is also available free of charge to residents. Smithtown residents can line up for pre-packaged bags of mulch with a maximum of 10 bags per visit. We offer free loading of loose mulch into your pick-up or dump truck. A cover is required.
  • Clothing Bins: Big Brothers Big Sisters of Long Island Clothing & Textile Bins are now located at MSF. Clothing and other textiles may be dropped off at these bins during regular business hours.  There is no charge however, donation receipts are not provided.
The Smithtown Municipal Services Facility is located at 85 Old Northport Road in Kings Park. 
Regular Operating Hours: Monday through Saturday from 7 a.m. to 3:15 p.m.

The Friends of the Port Jefferson Free Library presented their annual scholarship to two students in June. The winners were Hope Jacobsen, a senior from Sound Beach who recently graduated from Miller Place High School as well as Fiona Reichers, a senior from Port Jefferson who recently graduated from Earl L. Vandermeulen High School.

Hope will be studying Music Education at SUNY Potsdam in the Fall. Fiona will be attending SUNY at Purchase College and will be studying Theater Design/Technology, concentrating in Costume Design/Technology.

Both of the winners were chosen for their dedication towards Community Service as well as their use of the library.

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Suffolk County Crime Stoppers and Suffolk County Police Sixth Precinct Crime Section officers are seeking the public’s help to identify and locate the men who allegedly stole merchandise from a Medford store in June.

Two men allegedly stole merchandise from Lowes, located at 2796 Route 112, on June 27 at 7:16 p.m.

Suffolk County Crime Stoppers offers a cash reward for information that leads to an arrest. Anyone with information about these incidents can contact Suffolk County Crime Stoppers to submit an anonymous tip by calling 1-800-220-TIPS, utilizing a mobile app which can be downloaded through the App Store or Google Play by searching P3 Tips, or online at www.P3Tips.com. All calls, text messages and emails will be kept confidential.

This week’s shelter pet is Esme, a beautiful domestic short-haired, ten-month-old girl who adorns a stunning gray tuxedo coat. This sweet baby girl had thought she found a forever home months back, only to be returned due to an unexpected change in her family’s living situation. Despite this gut wrenching turn of events, Esme and the team at the shelter are hopeful that her chance at being a cherished forever family member will arrive before her first birthday.

At first she may seem a little shy or reserved when making Esme’s acquaintance.  However, with a little time and patience Esme will warm up to new faces with endless affection and purrs. This exquisite young lady is simply irresistible to any kitten-loving human and would bring a lifetime of joy and memories to one lucky family. Caretakers believe that Esme would be best suited in a home with older children, possibly cats and dogs.
If you are interested in meeting Esme, please fill out an application to schedule time to properly interact with your prospective soul mate in a domestic settingThe Town of Smithtown Animal & Adoption Shelter is located at 410 Middle Country Road, Smithtown. Visitor hours are Monday to Saturday from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. (Sundays and Wednesday evenings by appointment only).

For more information, call 631-360-7575 or visit www.townofsmithtownanimalshelter.com.

For more information regarding animals available for adoption visit:. TownofSmithtownAnimalShelter.com 

By TBR Staff

Port Jefferson residents enjoyed a day of American patriotism, which included a procession of community members, festively dressed families with red, white and blue-adorned pets and more for their annual 4th of July parade. The parade began on Main Street at 10 a.m. and was held by the Port Jefferson Fire Department. 

– Photos by Bill Landon

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Suffolk County Crime Stoppers and Suffolk County Police Second Squad detectives are seeking the public’s help to identify and locate two people who allegedly stole merchandise from a Commack store.

Two men allegedly stole five leather baseball gloves, with a combined value of approximately $1,620, from Dick’s Sporting Goods, located at 6070 Jericho Turnpike, on June 19 at approximately 8:20 p.m.

Suffolk County Crime Stoppers offers a cash reward for information that leads to an arrest. Anyone with information about these incidents can contact Suffolk County Crime Stoppers to submit an anonymous tip by calling 1-800-220-TIPS, utilizing a mobile app which can be downloaded through the App Store or Google Play by searching P3 Tips, or online at www.P3Tips.com. All calls, text messages and emails will be kept confidential.

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Suffolk County Crime Stoppers and Suffolk County Police Sixth Squad detectives are seeking the public’s help to identify and locate the man who allegedly stole from a Medford store last month.

A man allegedly stole allergy medication from Target, located at 2975 Horseblock Road, on June 18 at approximately 12:30 p.m. The medication was valued at more than $1,800. He fled in a silver sedan.

Suffolk County Crime Stoppers offers a cash reward for information that leads to an arrest. Anyone with information about these incidents can contact Suffolk County Crime Stoppers to submit an anonymous tip by calling 1-800-220-TIPS, utilizing a mobile app which can be downloaded through the App Store or Google Play by searching P3 Tips, or online at www.P3Tips.com. All calls, text messages and emails will be kept confidential.

Two Stony Brook Heart Institute (SBHI) cardiothoracic surgeons have been inducted into the American Association for Thoracic Surgery (AATS). Member inductions are reserved for a limited number of select physicians each year and SBHI has the distinction of having two cardiothoracic surgeons as AATS members. Henry Tannous, MD, Chief, Cardiothoracic Surgery and Co-Director, SBHI, was inducted during AATS’s 104th annual meeting on April 29th and Allison McLarty, MD, Director, Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation (ECMO) Program and Co-Director, Ventricular Assist Device (VAD) Program, was selected by the AATS for induction in 2020. The membership recognizes expertise, innovation and outstanding reputation for clinical excellence in both adult cardiac and thoracic surgery.

“It is an honor to have been inducted into the American Association for Thoracic Surgery and to be acknowledged among so many esteemed researchers, clinicians and clinical leaders,” says Dr. Tannous. “I am immeasurably grateful to join this noteworthy group of individuals, including my accomplished colleague Dr. McLarty. Our entire cardiothoracic team is focused on one goal — to deliver the best in surgical outcomes to our patients.”

From Dr. McLarty, Stony Brook’s first AATS inductee: “Being a part of the elite AATS community is humbling and inspires me daily to be even more resolute and unwavering in my pursuit of cardiothoracic excellence. It is a pleasure to extend my congratulations to Dr. Tannous.”

Stony Brook’s Chair of the Department of Surgery, Apostolos Tassiopoulos, MD, shared his congratulations, “Drs. Tannous and McLarty have truly set a benchmark in their striving for quality cardiothoracic care — their hard work and dedication are always evident, and this honor is well deserved. Placing Stony Brook among the most advanced facilities in the U.S., our skilled and dedicated heart and lung surgeons and our growing cardiothoracic program continues to raise the bar for cardiac and thoracic care here on Long Island.”

Founded in 1917, the prestigious AATS is composed of more than 1,500 of the world’s foremost cardiothoracic surgeons from 46 countries and recognizes the height of professional achievement and significant contributions of those at the top of their field.

For more information about Dr. Tannous and Dr. McLarty, visit https://heart.stonybrookmedicine.edu/AATS

 

Port Jefferson made waves this prom season with an extraordinary event — one that just may redefine high school celebrations across Long Island.

This year’s Earl L. Vandermeulen High School prom, themed “20,000 Leagues Under the Sea” and held Monday, July 1, was not just an event, but a testament to the creativity, dedication and community spirit of Port Jefferson.

Transforming the high school gymnasium into a magical undersea kingdom, the prom committee created an immersive experience for its peers. With vignettes, professional and theatrical-level lighting and stage constructions, Port Jefferson high school’s prom theme transported students to an enchanting world beneath the waves. As the seniors entered the festivities, they walked a red carpet and were given star-level treatment.

The school’s prom has long been anticipated as a highlight of the academic year, showcasing the talent and dedication of Port Jefferson’s community members. This school set a new standard for high school celebrations, not only in terms of creativity and design but also in fostering a sense of pride and camaraderie among students and residents alike.

For more information regarding the Port Jefferson School District and its students’ many achievements, please visit the district’s website, www.portjeffschools.org, and follow its Facebook page.