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Stony Brook University Hospital

Stony Brook University Hospital

Stony Brook University Hospital (SBUH) has achieved the highest level of national recognition as one of America’s 50 Best Hospitals for 2023, according to new research released by Healthgrades. This places SBUH in the top one percent of hospitals in the country.

SBUH has steadily increased its rankings — from the top 250 since 2015, to the top 100 since 2019, and now the top 50 — a reflection of its commitment to bring the best in care to its patients.

“I’m delighted with this significant accomplishment, which places us among the top one percent of hospitals in the country,” said Hal Paz, MD, MS, Executive Vice President for Health Sciences, Stony Brook University, and Chief Executive Officer, Stony Brook University Medicine. “It reflects the ongoing efforts of everyone across our hospital to continuously deliver outstanding clinical outcomes and an unwavering dedication to our patients.”

“The exceptional care found at Stony Brook University Hospital is only possible when a hospital commits to high standards of quality and continuous improvement throughout the organization,” said Carol A. Gomes, MS, FACHE, CPHQ, Chief Executive Officer for Stony Brook University Hospital. “I am grateful to our physicians, nurses and all staff for their tireless hard work, dedication and commitment to excellence.”  

“We’re proud to recognize Stony Brook University Hospital as one of America’s 50 Best Hospitals for 2023,” said Brad Bowman, MD, Chief Medical Officer and Head of Data Science at Healthgrades. “As one of America’s 50 Best Hospitals, SBUH consistently delivers better-than-expected outcomes for the patients in their community and is setting a high national standard for clinical excellence.”

Healthgrades evaluated patient mortality and complication rates for 31 of the most common conditions and procedures at nearly 4,500 hospitals across the country to identify the top-performing hospitals. This year’s analysis revealed significant variation between America’s Best 50 Hospitals and hospitals that did not receive the distinction. In fact, if all hospitals performed similarly to America’s 50 Best, over 150,000 lives could have been saved*.

Cardiac Care: 

These newest national and state rankings come on the heels of Healthgrades naming SBUH as one of America’s 50 Best Hospitals for Cardiac Surgery™, now for two years in a row (2022-2023). SBUH is one of only two hospitals in New York State to be named among America’s 100 Best Hospitals for Cardiac Care™ for nine years in a row (2015-2023). For more information, visit heart.stonybrookmedicine.edu/healthgrades

Stroke Care: 

SBUH is also proud to be the only hospital in New York State to be named one of America’s 100 Best Hospitals for Stroke Care for eight years in a row (2016-2023). In addition, Healthgrades 2023 rankings named SBUH as the #2 ranked hospital in NY for both Neurosciences and Stroke Care for 2023 — and one of only two hospitals on Long Island* in the top five. See other Stony Brook Neurosciences Institute-related Healthgrades achievements at neuro.stonybrookmedicine.edu/strokehealthgrades2023.

Hysterectomy Procedures: 

Additionally, for 2022 SBUH received a 5-star rating for Hysterectomy procedures, Healthgrades found that there is a significant variation in hospital quality between those that have received 5 stars and those that have not. For example, patients having a Hysterectomy in hospitals with 5-stars have, on average, a 65.1% lower risk of experiencing a complication while in the hospital than if they were treated by hospitals with 1-star. For more women’s health-related Healthgrades achievements, visit womenshealth.stonybrookmedicine.edu/news/healthgrades

“Year after year, our hospital’s Heart Institute and Cerebrovascular and Comprehensive Stroke Center continue to shine, providing a level of care few hospitals anywhere can match,” said Dr. Paz. “And our five-star rating for Hysterectomy places us among our nation’s Hysterectomy leaders.“

*Statistics are based on Healthgrades analysis of MedPAR data for years 2019 through 2021 and represent three-year estimates for Medicare patients only.

*Long Island is defined as Nassau and Suffolk counties.

Stony Brook University Hospital

Stony Brook University Hospital (SBUH) has been recognized by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) at the 2022 United Nations Climate Change Conference (COP27) for pledging ongoing action to decarbonize the health care sector and make health care facilities more resilient to the effects of climate change. SBUH has formally committed to pursuing the White House’s climate goal of reducing emissions by 50 percent by 2030 and achieving net zero emissions by 2050 and has already begun:

“I’m delighted that Stony Brook University Hospital has signed on to the White House/HHS Health Sector Climate Pledge as we continue to be recognized locally and nationally as a leader in sustainability efforts,” said Hal Paz, MD, Executive Vice President for Health Sciences, Stony Brook University and Chief Executive Officer, Stony Brook University Medicine. “We remain focused on these initiatives and accelerating the health system’s progress toward a climate-conscious approach to care.”

“At Stony Brook University Hospital, we have made it our mission to support sustainable healthcare initiatives and reduce our carbon footprint,” says Carol Gomes, MS, FACHE, CPHQ, CEO of Stony Brook University Hospital. “We look forward to working with the Department of Health and Human Services to continue to make environmental changes that benefit not only our planet, but also our patients, employees and communities for years to come.”

A September 2021 consensus statement from more than 200 medical journals named climate change the number one threat to global public health. It exposes millions of people in the United States to harm every year—with disproportionate impacts on historically disadvantaged communities—through increases in extreme heat waves, wildfires, flooding, vector-borne diseases and other factors that worsen chronic health conditions. The healthcare sector also contributes to climate change, accounting for approximately 8.5 percent of U.S. domestic emissions.

The HHS Office of Climate Change and Health Equity (OCCHE), part of the Office of the Assistant Secretary for Health, developed the White House/HHS Health Sector Climate Pledge to help focus industry response to climate challenges. In addition to reducing their carbon footprint, signatories also commit to producing detailed plans to prepare their facilities for both chronic and acute catastrophic climate impacts.

One hundred and two prominent health companies in the U.S. have signed the White House/HHS Health Sector Climate Pledge, including organizations representing 837 hospitals as well as leading health centers, suppliers, insurance companies, group purchasing organizations, pharmaceutical companies, and more. Federal systems like the Indian Health Service (IHS), Veterans Health Administration (VHA), and Military Health System (MHS) are working together to meet similar goals to those the private sector organizations have embraced. Combined, over 1,080 federal and private sector hospitals have made such commitments, representing over 15 percent of U.S. hospitals. 

“HHS returns this year to COP27 to report great progress,” said Admiral Rachel Levine, Assistant Secretary for Health for the Department of Health and Human Services. “Through the efforts of the Office of Climate Change and Health Equity and several other HHS agencies, we have made significant strides in introducing resources and support to help communities and care providers accelerate their work to reduce harmful emissions and increase climate resilience in the health sector.”

This year, SBUH was also named among the Top 25 in the nation for Environmental Excellence, which is the highest honor awarded by Practice Greenhealth. The hospital was previously honored for Environmental Excellence in 2021 and presented with the Top 25 award in 2020.

For more information about how Stony Brook University Hospital is responding to our nation’s climate challenges, visit stonybrookmedicine.edu/sustainability.

Photo from Stony Brook Medicine

The American College of Cardiology has recognized Stony Brook University Hospital as the only hospital on Long Island to have achieved the prestigious Chest Pain Center with Primary Percutaneous Coronary Intervention & Resuscitation designation in 2022. The designation recognizes the high-level of staff expertise and exceptional integration of the Stony Brook Cardiology Program, Emergency Medical Services and Cardiovascular Surgery Program. The accreditation also recognizes Stony Brook Medicine’s commitment to treating patients with chest pain. Stony Brook University Hospital is the only facility on Long Island to have received this accreditation during back-to-back cycles.

“Our ACC designation affirms that Stony Brook provides the most advanced and timely evidence-based heart attack or cardiac arrest care to the patients in our community,” saysRobert T. Pyo, MD, Director, Interventional Cardiology; Medical Director, Structural Heart Program and Associate Professor, Renaissance School of Medicine at Stony Brook University. “This can only be achieved through the exceptional skill of our cardiac and emergency services teams in offering the best quality emergency cardiac care available anywhere.”

The Chest Pain Center with Primary Percutaneous Coronary Intervention & Resuscitation designation means that Stony Brook University Hospital is optimally equipped, trained and staffed to care for patients during or after a heart attack or during a sudden cardiac arrest (when the heart malfunctions and suddenly stops beating). Patients arriving at Stony Brook University Hospital’s ER with symptoms of a cardiac emergency are treated according to quality-of-care measures that are proven to achieve better patient outcomes.

Dr. William Lawson, Vice Chair, Department of Medicine, Renaissance School of Medicine at Stony Brook University, noted that “Using Stony Brook’s “Code H” protocol, the Stony Brook Heart Institute has reduced the amount of time between a heart attack patient coming into the hospital to the opening and clearing of the blocked arteries with a stent or balloon-tipped catheter (angioplasty) to an average of just 54 minutes. This is a spectacular achievement, being over thirty minutes sooner than the 90 minutes or less specified in American Heart Association guidelines.”

“If you’re having a heart attack, every second counts,” says Julie Mangum, RN, Stony Brook Heart Institute’s Chest Pain Coordinator. “The key is to get treated as quickly as possible so there is less chance of heart muscle damage. Few hospitals can offer the diagnostic testing and the complete array of on-site interventional options that are available at Stony Brook.” In addition, for patients suffering from a cardiac arrest, Stony Brook University Hospital provides a robust hypothermia program that lowers a patient’s body temperature allowing for the best possible chance of meaningful recovery.

Hospitals that have earned ACC Chest Pain Center with Primary PCI and Resuscitation Accreditation have proven exceptional competency in treating patients with heart attack symptoms and have primary PCI (percutaneous coronary intervention) available 24/7 every day of the year. In addition, Stony Brook maintains a “No Diversion Policy” for out-of-hospital cardiac arrest patients which means that at no time are ambulances diverted away from our emergency department.

“By earning this distinguished chest pain center accreditation at Stony Brook, we’re again demonstrating to Long Island that we provide the highest level of cardiac care, even in the most complex cases,” noted Hal Skopicki, MD, PhD, Co-Director, Stony Brook Heart Institute and the Ambassador Charles A. Gargano Chair of Cardiology at Renaissance School of Medicine at Stony Brook University. “When having a heart attack, It is crucial to immediately seek care from the closest and most skilled facility available. For our community, I’m proud to say, that’s Stony Brook University Hospital.”

For more information about what it means for Stony Brook Heart Institute to be the region’s only accredited Chest Pain Center, visit this link.

About Stony Brook University Heart Institute:

Stony Brook University Heart Institute is located within Stony Brook University Hospital as part of Long Island’s premier university-based medical center. The Heart Institute offers a comprehensive, multidisciplinary program for the prevention, diagnosis and treatment of cardiovascular disease. The staff includes full-time and community-based, board-certified cardiologists and cardiothoracic surgeons, as well as specially trained anesthesiologists, nurses, physician assistants, nurse practitioners, respiratory therapists, surgical technologists, perfusionists, and other support staff. Their combined expertise provides state-of-the-art interventional and surgical capabilities in 24-hour cardiac catheterization labs and surgical suites. And while the Heart Institute’s clinical staff offers the latest advances in medicine, its physician-scientists are also actively enhancing knowledge of the heart and blood vessels through basic biomedical studies and clinical research. To learn more, visit www.heart.stonybrookmedicine.edu.

About the American College of Cardiology:

The American College of Cardiology envisions a world where innovation and knowledge optimize cardiovascular care and outcomes. As the professional home for the entire cardiovascular care team, the mission of the College and its 54,000 members is to transform cardiovascular care and to improve heart health. The ACC bestows credentials upon cardiovascular professionals who meet stringent qualifications and leads in the formation of health policy, standards and guidelines. The College also provides professional medical education, disseminates cardiovascular research through its world-renowned JACC Journals, operates national registries to measure and improve care, and offers cardiovascular accreditation to hospitals and institutions. For more, visit acc.org.

Photo from Stony Brook Medicine
Ranked Top 10 in the State

Stony Brook University Hospital (SBUH) has been recognized as a Best Hospital for 2022-23 by U.S. News & World Report, ranking in the top 50 nationally for Urology, Diabetes and Endocrinology. SBUH also climbed to a No. 9 ranking overall in New York State out of more than 155 hospitals statewide, up from No. 10 in the state last year.

SBUH ranked No. 41 nationally out of 1491 peer hospitals in Urology, which is in the top 3 percent. In Diabetes and Endocrinology, SBUH ranked No. 50 nationally out of 764 peer hospitals, which is in the top 7 percent.

“I’m delighted that Stony Brook Medicine continues to garner national recognition,” said Hal Paz, MD, Executive Vice President of Health Sciences and Chief Executive Officer, Stony Brook University Medicine. “U.S. News & World Report Best Hospital rankings is a national benchmark of quality and a metric that consumers rely on when seeking care. This ranking is the latest illustration of our never-ending commitment to delivering a quality patient experience and demonstrates the range of top-caliber expertise in our healthcare system.”

A total of 4,515 hospitals across 15 specialties and 20 procedures and conditions were evaluated by U.S. News. Of these hospitals, 1,895 met volume criteria in at least one specialty, and only 164 hospitals in the United States performed well enough to be nationally ranked in at least one specialty. The state ranking reflects the highest performing hospitals in the state across multiple areas of care.

“Achieving these Best Hospital national and state rankings speaks volumes about the quality of care our patients receive at Stony Brook University Hospital,” said Carol Gomes, MS, FACHE, CPHQ, Chief Executive Officer at Stony Brook University Hospital. “Whether it is for routine or complex care, the commitment of our faculty and staff is evident at all levels, at all times.”

U.S. News evaluated each hospital’s performance using a variety of measures such as survival rates, complication rates, patient experience and level of nursing care. The Best Hospitals methodology factors in data from the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services, American Hospital Association, professional organizations and medical specialists.

In addition to national rankings in Urology, Diabetes and Endocrinology, SBUH earned a “high performing” rating in the specialty of Neurology and Neurosurgery and in 12 procedures and conditions. These include: colon cancer surgery, lung cancer surgery, uterine cancer surgery, ovarian cancer surgery, prostate cancer surgery, heart attack, heart bypass surgery, heart failure, diabetes, kidney failure, stroke, maternity care (uncomplicated pregnancy), hip replacement, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and pneumonia.

These accolades follow on the heels of SBUH being named one of America’s 100 Best Hospitals™ for the past four years by Healthgrades – the only hospital on Long Island to receive the distinction for four consecutive years. Only four hospitals in New York State were named among America’s 100 Best Hospitals™ this year. For 2022, Stony Brook was also named by Healthgrades as one of America’s 50 Best Hospitals for Cardiac Surgery™; and one of America’s 100 Best Hospitals for Coronary Intervention™ (seven consecutive years), Cardiac Care (eight consecutive years), and Stroke Care (seven consecutive years).

“Recognition at this level from both U.S. News and Healthgrades does not come easy,” said Gomes. “Such an achievement requires years of hard work, dedication, collaboration and a steadfast commitment to continuously improving quality of care.”

For more information about Stony Brook Urology, click here.

For more information about Stony Brook Diabetes and Endocrinology, click here.

For more information about Stony Brook Heart Institute, click here.

For more information about Stony Brook Neurosciences Institute, click here.

About Stony Brook University Hospital:

Stony Brook University Hospital (SBUH) is Long Island’s premier academic health center. With 624 beds, SBUH serves as the region’s only tertiary care center and Regional Trauma Center, and is home to the Stony Brook University Heart Institute, Stony Brook University Cancer Center, Stony Brook Children’s Hospital and Stony Brook University Neurosciences Institute. SBUH also encompasses Suffolk County’s only Level 4 Regional Perinatal Center, state-designated AIDS Center, state-designated Comprehensive Psychiatric Emergency Program, state-designated Burn Center, the Christopher Pendergast ALS Center of Excellence, and Kidney Transplant Center. It is home of the nation’s first Pediatric Multiple Sclerosis Center. To learn more, visitwww.stonybrookmedicine.edu/sbuh.

Photo from Stony Brook Medicine

By Daniel Dunaief

[email protected]

While looking after the physical and mental well-being of patients who come in for care, Suffolk County hospitals are also focused on protecting staff, patients and visitors from the kind of violence that has spread recently throughout the country.

Over the past six months, hospital security staff and administrators have added a host of procedures to enhance safety and are considering additional steps.

“New measures have been put in place to minimize risk and better secure our buildings from a variety of threats,” Frank Kirby, Catholic Health Service line manager, wrote in an email. Catholic Health includes St. Catherine of Siena in Smithtown and St. Charles in Port Jefferson, among others.

“All Catholic Health facilities have an ‘active shooter’ contingency policy, which includes training for our employees on what to do in such an event,” Kirby wrote.

Executives at several health care facilities shared specific measures they have put in place.

The safe room

“Over the last six months or so, we have created something called the safe room,” said Dr. Michel Khlat, director at St. Catherine of Siena. Inside that room, hospital staff can hide and can find emergency items, like a door stop, medical supplies, gauze and first aid equipment.

St. Catherine recommends putting all the tables down in the safe room and hiding.

Khlat added that the hospital recommends that staff not open a door where another staff member knocks, in case a criminal is squatting nearby, waiting for access to the hospital.

Kirby added that Catholic Health facilities actively conducts drills across their hospitals, medical buildings and administrative offices to “sharpen our preparedness for any potential crisis that could impact safety and security.”

Catholic Health hospitals have onsite security guards and field supervisors who have prior military or law enforcement experience, Kirby added.

Northwell Health

As for Northwell Health, which includes Huntington Hospital, Scott Strauss, vice president of Corporate Security at Northwell, said the hospitals have an armed presence that includes many former and active law enforcement officers.

Strauss himself is a retired New York Police Department officer who, as a first responder on 9/11, rescued a Port Authority officer trapped by the fall of the World Trade Center.

Northwell is researching the possibility of installing a metal detection system.

Strauss suggested that the security program could not be successful without the support of senior leadership.

He suggested that staff and visitors can play a part in keeping everyone safe by remaining vigilant, as anyone in a hospital could serve as the eyes and ears of a security force.

The security staff has relied on their 15 to 35 years of experience to deescalate any potentially violent situations, Strauss said.

Northwell hospitals also offer guidance to staff for personal relationships that might
be dangerous.

“People don’t realize they’re in a poor relationship, they might think it’s normal,” Strauss said.

Across social media and the Internet, the communications team at Northwell monitors online chatter to search for anything that might be threatening.

“We evaluate it and notify the police as needed,” said Strauss.

Aggressive behavior

Strauss urged people who see something threatening online to share it with authorities, either at the hospitals or in the police force. “You can’t take a chance and let that go,” he said.

At this point, Northwell hasn’t noticed an increase in threats or possible security concerns. It has, however, seen an increase in aggressive behavior at practices and in
the hospitals.

In those situations, the security team investigates. They offer to get help, while making it clear that “threatening in any way, shape or form is not tolerated,” Strauss said. “There could be consequences” which could include being dismissed from the practice and filing police reports, Strauss said.

Anecdotally, Strauss believes Northwell has seen an increase in police reports.

When the draft of the Supreme Court’s decision that will likely overturn Roe vs. Wade, the landmark 1973 case that made it unconstitutional for states to restrict abortions, became public, Strauss was concerned about the potential backlash for health care providers.

So far, Strauss said gratefully, Northwell hasn’t seen any violence or threats related to the pending decision.

Stony Brook

Stony Brook University Hospital has an accredited and armed law enforcement agency on campus, in addition to a team of trained public safety personnel within the hospital, explained Lawrence Zacarese, vice president for Enterprise Risk Management and chief security officer at Stony Brook University.

Zacarese indicated that university officers are extensively trained in active shooter response protocols and are prepared to handle other emergency situations.

He added that the staff looks for ways to enhance security.

“Our training and security activities are continuous, and we are committed to exploring additional opportunities to maintain a safe and secure environment,” he explained in an email.

Kirby of Catholic Health Security suggested that hospitals do “more than provide care for surgical and medical inpatients. They also need to guarantee safety for all who enter our grounds.”

File photo

Even as the newer omicron subvariant of COVID-19 continues to spread throughout Long Island, hospitalizations and infections have been lower.

Hospitalizations, which had risen to 490 in mid-May from about 130 in early April, have been “slowly declining for the past week or two,” according to Dr. Gregson Pigott, commissioner of the Suffolk County Department of Health Service.

Area health care professionals suggested that the severity of symptoms also had eased up.

“COVID hospitalization rates are lower than in prior COVID waves,” Dr. Adrian Popp, chair of infection control at Huntington Hospital, explained in an email. Most of the patients have mild to moderate illnesses, although Huntington Hospital still does have some severe cases and/or a COVID-related death.

The average number of positive tests per 100,000 people in Suffolk County has declined from recent peaks. As of June 3, the 7-day average number of positive PCR and rapid tests per 100,000 people was 33, which is down from 52 on May 27 and 67.7 on May 20, according to New York State Department of Health data.

“If anything, Suffolk County rates are dropping,” said Dr. Michel Khlat, chief medical officer at St. Catherine of Siena in Smithtown. “We’re seeing a drop in inpatient cases.”

Many of the cases St. Catherine is finding are incidental, as the hospital tests for the virus in connection with other procedures.

At this point, the newer subvariant of omicron, called BA 2.12.1, accounted for 78.1% of the positive samples collected between May 22 and May 28 in New York, which is up from 593% in the prior two weeks, according to figures from the New York State Department of Health.

“Preliminary data suggest that Omicron may cause more mild disease, although some people may still have severe disease, need hospitalization, and could die from the infection with this variant,” Pigott added in an email.

Khlat suggested that hospitals aren’t tracking the type of variant. Even if they did, it wouldn’t alter the way they treated patients.

“It doesn’t make a difference” whether someone has one or another subtype of omicron, Khlat said. The treatment is identical.

Area doctors and medical care professionals continue to recommend that residents over 50 receive a second booster, particularly if they are immunocompromised or have other health complications.

“People over 50 should get the booster — it decreases the severity of COVID,” explained Popp.

Like much of the rest of the country, some Long Islanders have also contracted COVID more than once. The reinfection rate per 100,000 is currently 7.3%, according to New York State Department of Health figures.

“We are certainly seeing symptomatic COVID infections in persons who report having COVID at the beginning of this year or last year,” Dr. Susan Donelan, medical director of the Healthcare Epidemiology Department at Stony Brook Medicine, explained in an email. 

Popp explained that natural immunity from a COVID infection generally lasts about two to three months. Vaccine-related immunity generally lasts twice that duration, for about four to six months.

Doctors continue to urge caution during larger, poorly-ventilated indoor gatherings.

“Close crowds without masks, in an indoor setting with poor air flow, would be one version of a scenario with potential super-spreader potential,” Donelan explained.

Donelan said Stony Brook encouraged staff and patients to consider receiving boosters when they are eligible.

Popp believes wearing masks indoors while in a large gathering is a “reasonable” measure. That includes theaters, airplanes, buses and trains.

At Huntington Hospital, meetings continue to take place online.

“We decided as an organization that the risk of transmission is high enough to continue these measures,” Popp wrote. “We cannot afford to lose team members to COVID since it can negatively impact our operation.”

Stock photo

The national shortage of baby formula is creating health-related problems for newborns, while increasing anxiety for parents.

Stony Brook Medicine’s Dr. Jill Cioffi provides tips for parents searching for baby formula during the shortage. Photo from Stony Brook Medicine/ Jeanne Neville

Stony Brook University Hospital has seen patients in its primary care offices after formula changes, as parents indicate that infants have had reflux, vomiting, spitting up and loose stools and blood or mucus in their stools, according to Dr. Jill Cioffi, medical director of Ambulatory Primary Care Pediatrics at Stony Brook Children’s Hospital.

“This situation is difficult for all parents,” Cioffi explained in an email. “They are already experiencing the stress of caring for a newborn, adding food insecurity to this will only increase their stress and worry.”

Nationally, some hospitals are reporting that infants are coming to Emergency Departments due to lack of nutrition and dehydration. Thus far, Stony Brook has not seen such cases in its Emergency Department.

Stony Brook, however, said residents have been anxious over a crisis that has affected parents and their children in Suffolk County.

Indeed, some desperate parents have taken measures that have created discomfort and illness for their children.

Parents are watering down formula, searching for ways to make their own formula or switching to cow’s milk too early, Cioffi explained.

None of these efforts is medically safe and could lead to electrolyte and caloric problems for children, she continued.

Stony Brook recommends attempting to breastfeed newborns, continuing to breastfeed infants who have already started breastfeeding, finding substitute formulas, without sticking to  a particular brand, and transitioning to whole milk at 11 months or older.

For babies over nine months old, toddler’s formula is an option, but not a permanent solution until newborns are over 11 months old.

Parents with infants on specialized formula should reach out to their pediatricians to navigate their choices, Cioffi added.

Cioffi said she has heard that stores are still getting regular shipments of formula. Some of those stores have limited how much each family can buy at one time to decrease the chance that families purchase more than they need, leaving other parents with fewer options, leaving other parents with fewer options.

With news that shipments are coming in from Europe, Cioffi explained that she is hoping that health professions will receive instructions on how to help their patients obtain these supplies.

Cioffi urged parents to follow guidelines from the American Academy of pediatrics: 

Don’t dilute formula. 

Only purchase formula from reputable sources. Buying formula in parking lots of any place that doesn’t seem legitimate could be problematic because this food could either be expired or part of a recall, she explained. 

Don’t try to find a recipe to make formula. Stony Brook recommends whole cow’s milk only for children who are 11 months of age and older. 

Don’t give your child alternative milk products. Cioffi suggested avoiding almond or other plant milks because they are low in protein and minerals. 

Don’t give your baby toddler formula. Such food is not recommended for infants. Children close to a year old may tolerate it, if parents have no other choices. 

Check the shelf life of baby formula in stores.

Cioffi added that some children are not on regular milk-based formula for medical reasons.

“It’s those parents who are going to need medical help finding adequate solutions,” she added.

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Angela Kaziris, owner of Premiere Pastry, fills her car with pies to be delivered. Photo from The Ward Melville Heritage Organization

When Stony Brook Village Center businesses heard health care workers are in need of a little support, they didn’t hesitate to help.

Callie Brennan and Tim Martino, owners of Crazy Beans, dropping off meals to the hospital.

The Ward Melville Heritage Organization announced Monday that once again it has organized the village center’s restaurants and eateries to deliver meals and breakroom snacks to Stony Brook University Hospital.

“It’s disappointing that we have to start up this program again, but the health care workers are there for the Long Island community, and we have to be there for them,” said Gloria Rocchio, WMHO president.

Between April 2020 and May 2021, the Stony Brook Village/Stony Brook University Hospital Meal Train Program provided more than 12,000 meals and snacks to the medical professionals at SBUH, according to WMHO. Grist Mill Eatery, Mirabelle Restaurant at the Three Village Inn, Crazy Beans, Stony Brook Chocolate, Village Coffee  Market, Sweet Mama’s restaurant, Brew Cheese and Premiere Pastry are currently participating in the meal program.

According to WMHO, community members can become involved by donating to participating businesses.

Marios Patatinis, owner of Sweet Mama’s, said residents have been the heroes regarding the past and current meal trains due to their generous contributions. He said it enables restaurant owners to not only donate the food but helps to give the employees who prepare the meals more work hours.

“The true heroes are not the restaurants,” Patatinis said. “We have been working the hardest we can to keep afloat for the past few years, but it’s the families that are behind the scenes that are actually sponsoring these meals. They’re the ones that are the heroes in my eyes for the past two years.”

Carol Gomes, Stony Brook Medicine’s chief executive officer and chief operating officer, is grateful for the help.

“The team at Stony Brook University Hospital continues to provide a heroic level of care through this pandemic,  and the support provided by the Stony Brook village meal train program is deeply appreciated and a reflection of the ways in which the community values our efforts on their behalf,” she said.

Donations for the program can also be sent directly to WMHO, which is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization. Every dollar sent will be put toward the meal program and donations are tax-deductible. Checks can be made payable to WMHO, and “for the Stony Brook University Hospital Meal Program account” must be specified on the memo line. Checks can be sent to WMHO, P.O. Box 572, Stony  Brook, NY 11790.

Stony Brook University Hospital

This article was updated on Nov. 10.

A total of 107 Stony Brook Medicine physicians have been named “Top Doctors” on New York Magazine’s 2021 list. The list includes doctors from Stony Brook University Hospital, Stony Brook Southampton Hospital, and Stony Brook Eastern Long Island Hospital, across more than 45 different specialties. The “Top Doctors” list represents the top 10% of New York area physicians.

“The Stony Brook Medicine healthcare system is distinguished not only by the number of physicians named as top doctors, but also by the range of 45 specialties represented,” said Carol A. Gomes, MS, FACHE, CPHQ, Chief Executive Officer for Stony Brook University Hospital. “Every day, our physicians deliver high-quality care to patients, making a significant difference in their lives.”

New York Magazine generates its annual “Top Doctors” list for the New York metro area based on peer-reviewed surveys from Castle Connolly Medical Ltd., a New York-based research and information company. Each year, Castle Connolly surveys tens of thousands of practicing physicians across the US to ensure its list reflects the latest in quality care on both the national and regional levels. The company evaluates several criteria when selecting Top Doctors, including professional qualifications, education, hospital and faculty appointments, research leadership, professional reputation and disciplinary history. Through Castle Connolly’s research process, only 60,000 board-certified physicians out of 850,000 practicing doctors in the United States have been awarded Top Doctor status.

The Stony Brook Medicine “Top Doctors” featured in New York Magazine’s 2021 list by specialty are:

Adolescent Medicine

Allergy & Immunology

Cardiac Electrophysiology

Cardiovascular Disease

Child & Adolescent Psychiatry

Colon & Rectal Surgery

Dermatology

Diagnostic Radiology

Endocrinology, Diabetes & Metabolism

Family Medicine

Gastroenterology

Gynecologic Oncology

Hematology

Internal Medicine

Interventional Cardiology

Maternal & Fetal Medicine

Medical Oncology

Neonatal-Perinatal Medicine

Nephrology

Neurology

Neuroradiology

Obstetrics & Gynecology

Ophthalmology

Otolaryngology

Orthopaedic Surgery

Pathology

Pediatrics

Pediatric Cardiology

Pediatric Gastroenterology

Pediatric Infectious Disease

Pediatric Pulmonology

Pediatric Rheumatology

Pediatric Surgery

Pediatric Urology

Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation

Plastic Surgery

Psychiatry

Pulmonary Disease

Radiation Oncology

Rheumatology

Surgery

Thoracic & Cardiac Surgery

Urogynecology/Female Pelvic Medicine & Reconstructive Surgery

Urology

Vascular Surgery

About Stony Brook Medicine:

Stony Brook Medicine integrates and elevates all of Stony Brook University’s health-related initiatives: education, research and patient care. It includes five Health Sciences schools — Renaissance School of Medicine, Dental Medicine, Health Technology and Management, School of Nursing and School of Social Welfare — as well as Stony Brook University Hospital, Stony Brook Southampton Hospital, Stony Brook Eastern Long Island Hospital, Stony Brook Children’s Hospital and more than 200 community-based healthcare settings throughout Suffolk County. To learn more, visit www.stonybrookmedicine.edu.

About Stony Brook University Hospital:

Stony Brook University Hospital (SBUH) is Long Island’s premier academic medical center. With 624 beds, SBUH serves as the region’s only tertiary care center and Regional Trauma Center, and is home to the Stony Brook University Heart Institute, Stony Brook University Cancer Center, Stony Brook Children’s Hospital and Stony Brook University Neurosciences Institute. SBUH also encompasses Suffolk County’s only Level 4 Regional Perinatal Center, state-designated AIDS Center, state-designated Comprehensive Psychiatric Emergency Program, state-designated Burn Center, the Christopher Pendergast ALS Center of Excellence, and Kidney Transplant Center. It is home of the nation’s first Pediatric Multiple Sclerosis Center. To learn more, visit www.stonybrookmedicine.edu/sbuh.

About Stony Brook Southampton Hospital:

With 124 beds, Stony Brook Southampton Hospital (SBSH) is staffed by more than 280 physicians, dentists, and allied health professionals representing 48 medical specialties. A campus of Stony Brook University Hospital, SBSH offers a diverse array of clinical services, ranging from primary medical care to specialized surgical procedures, including cardiac catheterization, orthopedics and bariatrics. The sole provider of emergency care on Long Island’s South Fork, Stony Brook Southampton Hospital is a provisional Level III adult Trauma Center. The hospital includes The Phillips Family Cancer Center, a Heart and Stroke Center, Breast Health Center, The Center for Advanced Wound Healing, Wellness Institute, and 32 satellite care centers throughout the South Fork of Long Island. The hospital is the largest employer on the South Fork with more than 1,200 employees. To learn more, visit www.southampton.stonybrookmedicine.edu.

About Stony Brook Eastern Long Island Hospital:

With 70 beds, Stony Brook Eastern Long Island Hospital (SBELIH) is a full-service, community hospital committed to delivering excellence in patient care and meeting all the health needs of the North Fork and Shelter Island. A campus of Stony Brook University Hospital, SBELIH provides regional behavioral health programs serving the greater Suffolk County area. Centers of excellence include Medical-Surgical, Advanced Ambulatory Care, Behavioral Health, Emergency, Geriatric, Diagnostic Services, Physical Therapy and Gastrointestinal Services. To learn more, visit www.elih.stonybrookmedicine.edu.

CreditStony Brook Medicine

Photo courtesy of Stony Brook Medicine

According to new research released by Healthgrades, Stony Brook University Hospital (SBUH) has earned national recognition as one of America’s 50 Best Hospitals for Cardiac Surgery™, one of America’s 100 Best Hospitals for Coronary Intervention™ for seven consecutive years, one of America’s 100 Best Hospitals for Cardiac Care™ for eight consecutive years and one of America’s 100 Best Hospitals for Stroke Care™ for seven years in a row. Every year, Healthgrades, a leading online resource that connects consumers, physicians and health systems, evaluates hospital performance at nearly 4,500 hospitals nationwide for 31 of the most common inpatient procedures and conditions.*

“As the new leader of the Stony Brook Medicine healthcare system, I’m delighted by all that Stony Brook University Hospital has accomplished to earn this well-deserved recognition,” said Hal Paz, MD, Executive Vice President, Health Sciences, Stony Brook University. “I’m excited to be part of an organization that is so fully committed to quality patient outcomes, and enhancing the lives of our patients, their families and the community.”

“Being named as one of America’s best year after year shows our staff’s commitment to providing nationally recognized high-quality care to every patient who walks through our doors,” said Carol A. Gomes, MS, FACHE, CPHQ, Chief Executive Officer for Stony Brook University Hospital. “These exceptional patient outcomes are a direct result of Stony Brook’s dedication to maintaining the highest standards of service.”

“Consumers can feel confident in the America’s 100 Best Hospitals for Cardiac and Stroke Care for their commitment to quality care and exceptional outcomes. The recognition helps provide peace of mind when selecting a place for care,” said Brad Bowman, MD, Chief Medical Officer and Head of Data Science at Healthgrades.

This year, Stony Brook University Hospital has taken many steps to raise the bar for cardiac care on Long Island. The Stony Brook University Heart Institute opened its Cardiac Catheterization (Cath) and Electrophysiology (EP) Advanced Multifunctional Laboratory, bringing more advanced cardiac diagnosis and treatment to patients. Central to the lab’s operation is the latest-generation image-guided diagnostic and therapeutic imaging system, the Philips Azurion 7, which provides imaging capabilities at ultra-low radiation dose levels — allowing physicians to conduct more complex procedures with greater precision and adding a significant measure of safety for both the patients and medical team. The Heart Institute also added the Center for Advanced Lipid (Cholesterol) Management, the first of its kind in Suffolk County. The center uses testing tailored to each patient to get a complete understanding of inflammatory markers, lipid profile, apolipoprotein B levels and more. From there, Stony Brook experts can develop a cardiac disease prevention and cholesterol management plan.

Stony Brook Medicine continues to operate Long Island’s first and only Mobile Stroke Unit Program, designed to provide specialized, lifesaving care to people within the critical moments of a stroke before they even get to the hospital. This allows for time-sensitive stroke therapies to be administered earlier and for the transport of stroke patients directly to the most appropriate hospital for the level of care they require.

In 2021, SBUH received the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association’s Gold Plus Get With The Guidelines® – Stroke Award with Target: Stroke Elite Plus Honor Roll and Target: Type 2 Diabetes Honor Roll. The award recognizes Stony Brook Medicine’s commitment to ensuring stroke patients receive the most appropriate treatment according to nationally recognized, research-based guidelines based on the latest scientific evidence.

Stony Brook University Hospital was also recognized by Healthgrades for the following clinical achievements:

  • America’s 100 Best Hospitals Award for 3 years in a row (2019-2021)
  • Cardiac Care Excellence Award for 8 years in a row (2015-2022)
  • Coronary Intervention Excellence Award for 8 years in a row (2015-2022)
  • Cardiac Surgery Excellence Award for 2 years in a row (2021-2022)
  • Neuroscience Excellence Award for 7 years in a row (2016-2022)
  • Stroke Care Excellence Award for 7 years in a row (2016-2022)
  • Cranial Neurosurgery Excellence Award for 3 years in a row (2020-2022)

For its analysis, Healthgrades evaluated approximately 45 million Medicare inpatient records for nearly 4,500 short-term acute care hospitals nationwide to assess hospital performance in 31 common conditions and procedures and evaluated outcomes in appendectomy and bariatric surgery using all-payer data provided by 16 states. Healthgrades recognizes a hospital’s quality achievements for cohort-specific performance, specialty area performance, and overall clinical quality. Individual procedure or condition cohorts are designated as 5-star (statistically significantly better than expected), 3-star (not statistically different from expected) and 1-star (statistically significantly worse than expected).

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About Stony Brook University Hospital:

Stony Brook University Hospital (SBUH) is Long Island’s premier academic medical center. With 624 beds, SBUH serves as the region’s only tertiary care center and Regional Trauma Center, and is home to the Stony Brook University Heart Institute, Stony Brook University Cancer Center, Stony Brook Children’s Hospital and Stony Brook University Neurosciences Institute. SBUH also encompasses Suffolk County’s only Level 4 Regional Perinatal Center, state-designated AIDS Center, state-designated Comprehensive Psychiatric Emergency Program, state-designated Burn Center, the Christopher Pendergast ALS Center of Excellence and Kidney Transplant Center. It is home of the nation’s first Pediatric Multiple Sclerosis Center. To learn more, visit stonybrookmedicine.edu/sbuh.