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Joseph Reboli

'Rolling Wave Atlantic' by Casey Chalem Anderson

We all know that Long Island is a special place to live. Over at the Reboli Center for Art & History in Stony Brook, a beautiful new summer exhibit, Coming Home, showcases our island in all its glory.

“This past year has given us all an opportunity to reflect upon what is most important in our lives. For most, this includes family, friends and nature. The Reboli Center is honored to present the work of three artists whose works epitomize the wonder and beauty of Long Island: Casey Chalem Anderson, Lynn Mara and Joseph Reboli,” said Lois Reboli, a founder of the Reboli Center and wife of the late Joseph Reboli. The new exhibit opened July 20 and runs through Sept. 26.

‘Wave Rider’ by Lynn Mara

According to the prolific painter, Lynn Mara, a Long Island native, “I like to capture the American spirit through my work. My impressionist style turned abstract expressionist was influenced by my friend and fellow Southampton artist, the late Jack Reggio, as well as Andy Warhol, Fairfield Porter and Bansky.” Her media includes acrylic paint, oil pastels, hand cut stencils, spray paint and photographic images. Mara’s work has been featured on the Hampton Jitney, at Met Life Stadium, and she was the 2017 Hampton Classic poster design winner. Her flag painting was a gift to each member of the LPGA Solheim Cup in 2019 in Scotland. She is currently working on a 10th anniversary piece for the NY Giants, which will be given away at Giants Stadium this season.

Casey Chalem Anderson divides her time between Greenwich Village and Sag Harbor, where she immerses herself in both natural and urban artistic worlds. “I am a landscape painter who is secretly an abstract painter. After years of living by the beach and observing the daily color variations provided by the tides, sunlight and weather, I’m making paintings that are boiled down to the essential elements that I care about,” said Anderson. Her newest works are a series using the colors of her Hampton’s palette in novel abstract forms that connect her realist works.

‘Lookout’ by Joseph Reboli

Joseph Reboli grew up and lived in the Three Village area. Many of his works were painted on Long Island, Greenwich Village, Block Island and Tuscany. “Joe was noted for his luminous rendering of everyday scenes and subjects, infusing the mundane with an aura of wonder. No object was too familiar or humble for his transforming touch. His canvases glowed with an unmistakable light,” said Lois Reboli.

The History Room features a new exhibit as well. Titled Legacy of Leslie Marchant, the exhibit showcases the noted Stony Brook and Long Island builder and is curated by designer and author Tricia Foley. 

“There is a certain look about Leslie Marchant’s work – classic and symmetrical in style, usually brick or stone in material, and usually American Colonial Revival. This timeless style is seen in churches and schools, post offices and community centers throughout the Town of Brookhaven and the East End. Marchant was the ‘go-to’ builder of his time – from Bellport High School to the Stony Brook Crescent, Marchant built structures to last in this enduring and familiar vernacular,” said Foley. 

Join the Reboli Center on Sept. 25 from 3 to 5 p.m. for a “Birthday Celebration for Joseph Reboli,” who would have turned 76 on that date. 

The Reboli Center, 64 Main St., Stony Brook is open Tuesday to Saturday from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m., and Sunday from 1 to 5 p.m. Admission to the gallery is free. For more information visit their website at www.rebolicenter.org or call 631-757-7707.

Come explore the art & beauty of cars and motorcycles                              on canvas and on the pavement

The Reboli Center of Art and History is revving up in more ways than one with its newest exhibit focusing on motor vehicles. Titled Shifting Gears, the exhibit includes artworks of various modes of transportation, as well as two 1928 BMW motorcycles on loan from the Nettesheim Museum in Huntington. This theme continues in the History Room where an account of the Vanderbilt Motor Parkway is explored, courtesy of historian Howard Kroplick. 

In addition, weather permitting, the Center’s parking lot will feature exotic car collections from 10 a.m. until 2 p.m on May 30 (German) and June 13 (British).

“We have spectacular motor-themed paintings by such noted artists as Alan Bull, Scott Hewett, Nelson Medina, Jim Molloy, Doug Reina and Joseph Reboli, as well as exquisitely crafted model cars by Marshall Buck, and two 1928 BMW motorcycles on display,” said Lois Reboli, a founder of the Stony Brook-based gallery which opened in 2016.

“We have not done anything like this before and we think this is a fun way of enticing people back to local museums, which are now being opened to a greater capacity since the pandemic began. This show offers something for everyone — art lovers, car aficionados and history buffs,” said Reboli. 

“The Reboli Center is extremely grateful to Plycon Transportation Group in Kings Park for sponsoring this exhibit and for the generosity of Display Makers in Nesconset,” she added.

The Reboli Center for Art and History, 64 Main St., Stony Brook will present Shifting Gears through July 18. The gallery is open Tuesday through Saturday from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. and Sunday from 1 p.m. to 5 p.m. except during the car displays when it will open at 10 a.m. The Center is free and open to the public and masks must be worn inside. 

For more information about the exhibit, the Gift Shop or available sponsorships, please call 631-751-7707.

The Reboli Center for Art and History, 63 Main St., Stony Brook has named Long Island potter, Laura Peters, as its artisan of the month for January, which will kick off the new year of 2021. “Laura’s striking and intricate work is extraordinary, bringing the beauty of nature to life in her impressive line of vases, mugs, plates and other art,” said Lois Reboli, founder of the Reboli Center and wife of the late renowned artist, Joseph Reboli, for whom the center is named.

Laura Peters

“I mainly focus on the flora and fauna of North America and beyond, and hope to convey the beauty and value of each species throughout my work,” explained Peters. “The result is a unique one of a kind original.”

Since she was a child, Peters has worked in various artistic media. She was first introduced to pottery after moving to the Pacific Northwest from New York and credits her inspiration for her work from field observations and her studies in Anthropology and Zoology at Oregon State University, and the extraordinary animals she worked with at the Chintimini Wildlife Rehabilitation Center in Oregon.

“I found that my graphic art and illustrative background led me to approach the clay as a surface to be rendered upon. My work is primarily hand built using slabs or coils of clay. Each piece is created over a period of weeks in intricate detail. The most time consuming aspect is the underglaze brushwork, I do not use decals or any other form of image transfer,” said Peters.

Peters returned to New York seven years ago where she connected with a group of fellow potters and they worked together to establish a pottery workspace, The Brick Clay Studio in St. James, where she teaches and does a large portion of her clay work.

“For me, the process of transforming the soft clay into utilitarian wares can be both rewarding and challenging. Because the medium utilizes the four basic elements: earth, water, fire and air, obstacles often arise throughout the production of the piece.  I address these challenges through the development of new techniques and experimentation. Thus, I look forward to continuing the vast possibilities which clay has to offer, and see how my work unfolds over time,” added Peters.

Visitors can see Laura Peter’s work at the Reboli Center, where her pottery is for sale in the Design Shop. The Center is free, and open Tuesday to Saturday from 11 a.m.  to 5 p.m. and Sunday from 1 to 5 p.m. Masks must be worn, and social distancing is required. For more information on the Artisan of the Month, please call the Reboli Center at 631-751-7707.

‘View from the Red Room’ by Joseph Reboli

By Melissa Arnold

For more than three decades, Joseph Reboli dedicated his life to creating art and sharing it with the world. His vibrant oil paintings, many of which focused on scenes in the Three Village area, were beloved not only here on Long Island but around the world for the way they captured the essence of the places he loved. Reboli’s work has been on display in museums, private collections and homes around the world.

Since its founding in 2016, the Reboli Center for Art and History in Stony Brook has worked to preserve the legacy of its namesake, who died in 2004, while also highlighting the people and places that most inspired him. Its newest exhibit, on display beginning Nov. 1, will focus on one of Reboli’s unique honors: his inclusion in an exhibit at the White House.

“Joe was a very modest guy, but I think he was really honored by this opportunity, and it was one of the highlights of his career,” said Lois Reboli, Joe’s wife of 14 years.

In 2000, the nation’s capital was preparing to mark the 200th anniversary of the White House. To celebrate, the White House Historical Association planned an art exhibit and companion calendar titled White House Impressions: The President’s House Through the Eye of the Artist. The association selected 14 well-respected artists to participate, with one artist representing each of the 13 original colonies and the District of Columbia. 

Among the chosen artists were Reboli, who represented New York for the month of March, as well as realist painter Ken Davies of Massachusetts, Reboli’s former professor at the Paier College of Art, representing February. 

The cover of the 2000 White House calendar.

The other artists were Domenic DiStefano (Pennsylvania, December 1999), Al Alexander (New Jersey, January 2000), Ray Ellis (Georgia, April 2000), John Barber (Virginia, May 2000), Marjorie Egee (Delaware, June 2000), Marilyn Caldwell (Connecticut, July 2000), Tom Freeman (Maryland, August 2000), West Fraser (South Carolina, September 2000), Richard Grosvenor (Rhode Island, October 2000), Carol Aronson-Shore (New Hampshire, November 2000) and Bob Timberlake (North Carolina, December 2000). Carlton Fletcher of the District of Columbia was granted the cover.

“We made the trip down to the White House in 1999, and the artists got to meet with Bill and Hillary Clinton. It was our first trip to the White House, and definitely impressive to us both,” Lois Reboli recalled. “Joe had been in the Army and he was a very patriotic person. A White House photographer walked around with each artist as they decided what they wanted their piece to be — the photographer was the only one allowed to take pictures. Then the artists took the photos home to work.”

Reboli was the only artist in the White House exhibit to choose a point of view from inside the building. His painting, “View from the Red Room,” looks outside to the South Portico with the Jefferson Memorial in the background. 

The Red Room has served a variety of purposes in different presidencies, from a music room to a meeting space, the backdrop for official photos and family dinners. First Lady Jackie Kennedy once said that the view from the Red Room was her favorite in the White House because it looked out on the American people. 

“When I saw this particular view, I loved the light on the South Portico with the landscape in the background,” Reboli wrote at the time about his choice. “The light’s reflection on the portico contrasted nicely with the dark interior of the room.”   

The painting from the Red Room will be on display at the Reboli Center, along with the White House calendar and original work from nine of the 14 artists featured in the 2000 exhibit, said Reboli Center secretary Colleen Hanson.

“This exhibit was a huge undertaking, and took a lot of detective work in some cases. Lois has been working on this exhibit for more than 8 months. It was a search for contacts with the artists of the calendar, communicating back and forth, and then finally getting the artwork. This was a rather complicated exhibit to put together because of the number of artists involved, the time span of an event that happened more than 20 years ago, and the fact that during those 20 years not everyone had stayed put and that deaths had occurred,” Hanson said. 

“We wanted to share the work the artists did for the White House as well as some of their original work to give a greater sense of who they were and their artistic interests.”

The White House Calendar exhibit will be on display from Nov. 1 through Jan. 26, 2020 at the Reboli Center for Art and History, 64 Main St., Stony Brook. Participating artists include Al Alexander, Carol Aronson-Shore, Marilyn Caldwell, Ken Davies, Domenic DiStefano, Ray Ellis, West Fraser, Richard Grosvenor and the late Joe Reboli. For more information, call 631- 751-7707 or visit www.rebolicenter.org.

'Harvest's End' by Marge Governale

When autumn arrives, residents of the Three Village area may start to think of the annual fall art show that has become a true community treasure. The Setauket Artists will host its 38th Artists’ Exhibition 2018 from Oct. 28 to Nov. 19 at the Setauket Neighborhood House, 95 Main Street, Setauket. 

‘Last Cottage’ by Fred Mendelsohn

Over 40 award-winning artists will participate in the show this year including Lana Ballot, Ross Barbara, Shain Bard, Eleanor Berger, Rina Betro, Joan Bloom, Renee Caine, Al Candia, Gail L. Chase, Anthony Davis, Julie Doczi, Jeanette Dick, W.A. Dodge, Marge Governale, Peter Hahn, Melissa Imossi, Laurence Johnston, Anne Katz, Flo Kemp, Karen Kemp, Michael R. Kutzing, John Mansueto, Jane McGraw Teubner, Terry McManus, Eleanor Meier, Fred Mendelsohn, Muriel Musarra, Genia Neuschatz, Iacopo Pasquinelli, Paula Pelletier, Denis Ponsot, Joseph Reboli, Joan Rockwell, Robert Roehrig, Irene Ruddock, Carole Link Scinta, Sungsook Setton, Barbara Jeanne Siegel, Angela Stratton, Mac Titmus, Nancy Weeks, Marlene Weinstein, Laura Westlake and Patricia Yantz. 

‘Perfect Day’ by Lana Ballot

The exhibition will kick off with an opening reception on Sunday, Oct. 28 from 1 to 4 p.m. All are invited to this free event to enjoy some light refreshments while viewing the beautiful artwork, all of which will be for sale. Take a chance on winning a painting by four Setauket artists, the proceeds of which support the art organization. Marlene Weinstein will offer a photograph titled “Fishing Boat Trio,” John Mansueto will offer an original oil, Muriel Mussara will offer a watercolor titled “Conscience Bay” and Frederic Mendelsohn, this year’s honored artist, will also offer an original oil painting. 

For over 10 years, Fred Bryant of Bryant Funeral Home has sponsored the Setauket Artists, allowing this exhibit to be one of the most attended functions in the Three Village area.  

‘Autumn Reflections’ by John Mansueto

This year’s distinguished guest artist is David Peikon, renowned oil painter and winner of many awards throughout the country. Tom Mason, known for his old master paintings and portraiture, will be the distinguished judge.  

If you miss the first reception, you will have a chance to meet your favorite artists at the second reception at the annual Wine and Cheese Art Event held on Friday, Nov. 16 from 5 to 7 p.m. Many new paintings will be displayed for the evening, just in time for holiday giving.

“Don’t miss this once-a-year opportunity to attend the receptions or daily viewing to see paintings that are classic and enduring and have given credence to our motto “Art for a lifetime,” said Irene Ruddock, coordinator of the event, adding, “After the exhibit, visit www.SetauketArtists.com to learn about the group’s Art Consultation feature where you may arrange to see paintings in your home before you decide whether or not to purchase them. The paintings of the artists include a wide range of modalities featuring work that is impressionistic, contemporary or traditional, including a portrait artist who will paint the perfect likeness of your loved ones or pet.”

For further information, you may contact  Irene Ruddock at [email protected] or 631-365-1312. For viewing hours at the Setauket Neighborhood House, visit www.setauketartists.com on the Events page.

‘Cassio’ by Dino Rinaldi

By Melissa Arnold

‘Stable Door’ by Joseph Reboli

Horses, whether ridden, raced, bred or simply beloved, have long been a part of Long Island’s culture. From the Belmont Stakes in Nassau to the Smithtown Hunt and the Old Field Farm in Suffolk, the majestic animals hold a special place in the hearts of many.

Among them was the late artist Joe Reboli, whose 30-year career was defined by bringing both famous places and ordinary views of the Three Village area to life with great care and realism.

The Reboli Center for Art and History in Stony Brook was founded in 2016 to celebrate Reboli’s life and honor the history of the place he called home. Since then, the center has created a number of exhibits blending Reboli’s work with local artists as well as artifacts from Long Island’s past.

On Tuesday, the center opened an exciting  new exhibit, Artistry: The Horse in Art, which will focus on horses and their environment through a variety of mediums. Among the Reboli works in the exhibit is “The Stable Door,” an oil-on-canvas painting.

Roberto Dutesco’s ‘Love’ will be on exhibit at the Reboli Center through Oct. 28.

“Joe had a way of capturing this community that evoked such wonderful feelings from people,” said Reboli Center co-founder Colleen Hanson. “His painting of a stable door in our exhibit was done for [the late publisher] John McKinney. Joe’s ability to paint white was just astounding — there is more to the color white than many people realize; there are so many shades and hues in it and he captured them all.”

In addition to work from Reboli, the exhibit will highlight three other main artists. Roberto Dutesco, a Romanian-born Canadian artist, is well known for his fashion photography. But in 1994, Dutesco began to explore nature photography with a trip to Sable Island, nearly 200 miles off the coast of Nova Scotia. There he photographed the island’s breathtaking wild horses. He has returned to the island six times since then with the goal of inspiring greater conservation efforts through his work. 

‘Zidette’ by Dino Rinaldi

Dino Rinaldi is a Port Jefferson native whose winding career has taken him from illustration to advertising and finally painting full time. As a teen, Rinaldi recalls opening up an issue of the local newspaper and seeing a painting of gasoline pumps by Reboli. 

“I looked at it and thought, someday I want to be able to paint like that. It moved me,” said Rinaldi, who now lives in Setauket with his wife and daughter. “To be able to create art for a living is a dream come true.” Keep an eye out for “Zidette,” Rinaldi’s graphite powder-and-pencil drawing.

Elena Hull Cournot, who originally hails from East Setauket, now provides creative arts therapy in the West Village and owns a studio in Brooklyn. Horses are a mainstay of Cournot’s work, who is known for her large commissioned paintings of horses and soulful works created during her time as an artist in residence at the Burren College of Art in Ireland. Like storytellers who seek to capture the personal essence of their subjects, Cournot strives to spend time with each horse she paints. One of those horses was “Indie,” whose oil-on-canvas portrait is featured in the gallery.

The center’s history gallery will focus on events and places that include horses in a prominent role. The Smithtown Hunt is the only surviving foxhound hunt on Long Island. While it was originally a live hunt when it was first held in 1900, it is now exclusively a drag hunt. The Old Field Farm was built by Ward Melville in 1931 and continues to be a hot spot for the equestrian community. 

“Every year, we sit down and talk about what kind of exhibits we’d like to have. We look at different community events that are going on, and then work to determine the artists we might feature and a theme based around that,” Hanson explained. “This is such an interesting and fun show — there are so many people who love horses and have owned or ridden them at some point. They are beautiful, intelligent creatures that have a wide appeal.”

Hanson also joked that her own history was a factor in the decision. In the decade she spent as the director of Gallery North in Setauket, not a single exhibit featured a horse. Thanks to this exhibit, she’s now hung more than 30 horse paintings, drawings and photos.

The center will hold several special free events during the exhibit’s run, each coinciding with Third Friday activities in the area. Dino Rinaldi and Roberto Dutesco will be at the center Aug. 17; Leighton Coleman, Sally Lynch and Edmunde Stewart will be welcomed on Sept. 21; and on Oct. 19 there will be a screening of the documentary “Snowman,” which tells the story of a simple workhorse saved from the slaughterhouse by a Long Island man. Snowman went on to become a national show jumping champion.   

See Artistry: The Horse in Art through Oct. 28 at the Reboli Center for Art and History, 64 Main St., Stony Brook. Admission is free. For information, call 631-751-7707 or visit www.rebolicenter.org. 

'Hydrangea Cottage' by Joseph Reboli

STONY BROOK: Following the overwhelming response from its previous painting events, The Reboli Center for Art and History, 64 Main St., Stony Brook will host its fourth Painting Party on Wednesday, May 16 from 7 to 9:30 p.m.

The instructors for the evening, Eileen Sanger and Linda Davison Mathues of The Winey Painters, will lead participants in creating a new painting using Joseph Reboli’s “Hydrangea Cottage” as inspiration. Artists, past and present, lived very interesting lives, and The Winey Painters will combine art history with the painting. 

With the instructors’ many years of teaching experience, everyone leaves happy and sometimes amazed at their own hidden talent. Registration fee is $45 per person and includes all supplies. No experience needed. To sign up, drop by the Reboli Center or call 631-751-7707.

Recreate Joseph Reboli’s ‘Beach’ painting like the sample above on April 26. Image courtesy of the Reboli Center

Looking for a fun night out? The Reboli Center for Art and History, 64 Main St., Stony Brook is hosting a painting party on Wednesday, April 26 from 7 to 9:30 p.m.

For a registration fee of $45 each participant will complete a painting in the style of Joseph Reboli. All supplies are included and no experience is necessary. As a special added attraction, Mora’s Wine of Setauket will be having a wine tasting for participants!

The instructors for the evening are Eileen Sanger and Linda Davison Mathues, who are friends in life and art. Both are award-winning, professional artists with representation in art galleries. Recognizing that there is a real interest in picking up a brush and painting in a fun social atmosphere, the two artists formed The Winey Painters. Eileen and Linda bring something unique to the painting party experience. Their projects always are carefully planned around a famous artist, at the Reboli Center that artist is Joseph Reboli. They delve into just what makes a particular artist paint in a unique style.

Artists, past and present, lived very interesting lives, and The Winey Painters combine art history with the painting. With the instructors’ many years of teaching experience, everyone leaves happy and sometimes amazed at their own hidden talent. So come join The Winey Painters and have a great time making your own Reboli masterpiece!

The Painting Party has a limited enrollment, so sign up early. To register, come to the Reboli Center or call 631-751-7707 during business hours, Tuesday through Saturday from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. or Sunday from 1 to 5 p.m.

'Salt Glazed Pitcher' by Ken Davies

By Ellen Barcel

After a remarkable career spanning over 60 years, artist Ken Davies has earned the title of one of the top masters of realistic still life. Now Davies is the star of a special group show at the Reboli Center for Art and History in Stony Brook, appropriately titled Ken Davies: Realism in the 20th Century.

The 50-piece exhibit, which is the second show at the newly opened gallery and runs through April 30, focuses on Davies and his students, including Joseph Reboli, Richard Newman, Dennis Coburn and George (Gig) Thompson, all college classmates and lifelong friends of Reboli. In addition, work by Jo-Anne Scavetta and Daniel Patrick Buckley, collaborators of Davies, will be on display.

Davies was Reboli’s teacher, mentor and friend. “When Joe chose a college to go to, he selected Paier [School of Art in Hamden, Connecticut] because of its classical tradition. Ken Davies was the person who wrote the curriculum for Paier,” noted Colleen Hanson, trustee of the Reboli Center.

With many works in private collections as well as museums, Davies, 92, is known for his almost photographic-like quality of painting, taking the ordinary and transforming it to a work of fine art. Close to two dozen of the award-winning artist and former dean of Paier paintings will be on display. “We have paintings of Joe’s alongside of Ken’s to show his influence on Joe’s paintings,” said Hanson.

Ken Davies

Said Lois Reboli, Joseph Reboli’s widow and president of the Reboli Center, “I know my husband thought so highly of Ken Davies. He had such an influence on [Joe’s] paintings. ” She added that it was Davies who recommended Joe Reboli represent New York in the White House commemorative calendar published in 2000.

Reboli’s paintings on display at the current exhibit include three of the Pemaquid Lighthouse, circa 1994 (“Stairlight 1987,” on loan; “Fennel,” on loan; and “Beets,” part of the Reboli Center’s collection). Also on display will be “Shell,” a painting Reboli did as a student at the Paier School. A fifth, “Bellport Gate,” is on loan from Gallery North.

In addition, four of Reboli’s works from private collectors — “Hoses,” “Green Barn,” “West Meadow Beach” and “Screened Window” will be on display and for sale. The commissions from those sales will benefit the center and help finance the purchase of additional paintings for the center’s collection.

Said Hanson, “The reason we chose this to be the second exhibit is to expand people’s understanding and knowledge of Joe as a painter. In our first exhibit, A Sense of Place, we wanted to show both how important the community setting had been in the subject matter of Joe’s paintings and also how relevant the site of the Reboli Center was to Joe’s background, how close it was to his childhood home …”

Hanson went on to explain that Reboli’s aunt was an important part of the bank, the Stony Brook building that now houses the Reboli Center, and that “his grandfathers’ careers (were) involved in the setting — the grist mill, tavern, green grocer, etc.” in Stony Brook Village.

On March 17 from 5 to 7 p.m., as part of the center’s Third Friday series of programs, Long Island artist Dan Pollera will be speaking about his paintings of Long Island, his career, his connection with Reboli and his inspiration as a working artist. A question and answer period will follow.

April’s Third Friday program will feature poet and novelist Claire White. Christina Strassfield of Guild Hall is scheduled to speak in May and in June Deborah Johnson, author of “Joseph Reboli,” a volume published in connection with The Long Island Museum’s exhibit in 1998 will speak. The programs are free and open to the public; no reservations are required.

Johnson’s volume is for sale at the center. Lois Reboli noted that when the center ran out of the books, The Long Island Museum generously donated a number of copies. “We were thrilled with that. They were very kind to us. We’re so grateful to the community for all the support they’ve shown us. We hope to borrow more paintings from community members in the future.” She especially thanked Howard Eskin who recently passed away. “He was wonderful in letting us borrow paintings.”

Future plans include a garden show beginning in May. “We hope to never have the same show twice,” Lois Reboli said, adding that a garden party fundraiser is planned for June. She also noted that Fort Salonga sculptor David Haussler, who recently passed away, just had some sculptures delivered to the center for display. “We’re grateful to have his sculptures on the property… He’s remarkable.”

The Reboli Center for Art and History, 64 Main Street, Stony Brook is open Tuesday through Saturday from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. and Sunday from 1 to 5 p.m. Call 631-751-7707 or visit www.rebolicenter.org for further details.