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Catholic Health

Randolph G. Howard

Randolph G. Howard, Jr., MHA, FACHE, has been named Chief Operating Officer at Catholic Health’s St. Catherine of Siena Hospital (SCSH). A retired army officer, Mr. Howard has 20 years of experience in healthcare administration.

In his new role, Mr. Howard will oversee SCSH’s daily hospital operational and administrative functions; design and implement business strategies; set comprehensive goals for performance and growth across all clinical services lines; and continue to ensure patient safety and patient satisfaction. 

“We are very fortunate to have Mr. Howard part of St. Catherine’s senior leadership team,” said SCSH President James O’Connor. “With extensive experience in hospital operations, system integration and facilities management, Mr. Howard has proven his steadfast leadership, strategic capital planning and keen decision-making skills in addressing various operational issues. As St. Catherine’s COO, Mr. Howard will further enhance our hospital’s mission in providing the highest quality of care to our patients.”

Prior to joining Catholic Health, the Centerport resident served as Northwell Health’s Senior Vice President, Corporate Facilities Services where he oversaw property management for 18 million square feet for all Northwell-affiliated hospitals, as well as over 800 non-hospital properties. 

Sechrist model chamber for hyperbaric oxygen therapy. Photo courtesy Renee Novelle

Port Jefferson’s St. Charles Hospital will open its new Center for Hyperbaric Medicine & Wound Healing on July 18, as the hospital seeks to help people with chronic, nonhealing wounds.

The center, which will be located on the second floor of the hospital, will include two hyperbaric chambers that provide 100% pure oxygen under pressurized conditions and will have four examining rooms.

The chamber “provides patients with the opportunity to properly oxygenate their blood, which will increase wound healing and wound-healing time,” said Jason Foeppel, a registered nurse and program director for this new service.

Potential patients will be eligible for this treatment when they have wounds that fail to heal after other treatments for 30 days or more.

Residents with circulatory challenges or who have diabetes can struggle with a wound that not only doesn’t heal, but can cause other health problems as well.

More oxygen in people’s red blood cells promotes wound healing and prevents infection.

The treatment “goes hand in hand to deliver aid to the body’s immune system and to promote a healing environment,” Foeppel said.

Nicholas Dominici, RestorixHealth regional director of Clinical Operations; Ronald Weingartner, chief operating officer, St. Charles Hospital; Jim O’Connor, president, St. Charles Hospital; and Jason Foeppel, program director. Photo courtesy Renee Novelle

St. Charles is partnering with RestorixHealth in this wound healing effort. A national chain, RestorixHealth has created similar wound healing partnerships with other health care facilities in all 50 states.

The new wound healing center at St. Charles is one of several others on Long Island, amid an increased demand for these kinds of services.

Partnering with Healogics, Huntington Hospital opened a hyperbaric chamber and wound healing center in May 2021. Stony Brook Southampton Hospital also has a wound care center.

“There’s a great need for this in our community,” said John Kutzma, program director at the Huntington Hospital center. “We know that there are 7 million Americans living with chronic wounds,” many of whom did not receive necessary medical attention during the worst of the pandemic, as people avoided doctors and hospitals.

Concerns about contracting COVID-19 not only kept people from receiving necessary treatment, but also may have caused nonhealing wounds to deteriorate for people who contracted the virus.

Although Kutzma hasn’t read any scientific studies, he said that, anecdotally, “We’ve had patients that had COVID whose wounds haven’t healed as quickly as non-COVID patients.”

Patients at the Huntington Hospital center range in age from 15 to 100, Kutzma said. People with diabetes constitute about one-third of the patients.

Treatment plan

For the hyperbaric chamber to have the greatest chance of success, patients typically need daily treatments that last between one and a half to two hours, five days a week for four to six weeks. While the time commitment is significant, Foeppel said it has proven effective in wound healing studies.

“We pitch it as an antibiotic treatment,” he said. “You want to complete that full cycle to ensure the body has enough time to complete the healing process.”

Kutzma said Huntington Hospital reviews the treatment plan with new patients.

In following the extensive treatment protocol to its conclusion, he said, “The alternative is to live with this very painful, chronic wound that may lead to amputation.” Given the potential dire alternative, Huntington Hospital doesn’t “have a problem getting that kind of commitment.”

While the treatment has proven effective for many patients, not everyone is medically eligible for the hyperbaric chamber.

Colin Martin, safety director. Photo courtesy Renee Novelle

Some chemotherapy drugs are contraindicators for hyperbaric oxygen treatments. Those patients may have other options, such as skin grafts, extra antibiotics or additional visits with physicians for debridement, which involves removing dead, damaged or infected tissue.

“We invite patients to come in, go through the checklist and see what their plan of attack” includes, Foeppel said.

The cost of the hyperbaric treatment for eligible conditions is generally covered by most health insurance plans, including Medicaid and Medicare, he said. 

The two hyperbaric chambers at St. Charles can treat eight to 10 patients in a day.

Aside from the cost and eligibility, patients who have this treatment frequently ask what they can do during their treatments. The center has a TV that can play movies or people can listen to music.

“We don’t expect you to sit there like in an MRI,” Foeppel said.

As for complaints, patients sometimes say they have pressure in their ears, the way they would if they ascend or descend in an airplane. The center urges people to hold their nose and blow or to do other things to relieve that pressure.

Foeppel encourages patients to use the restroom before the treatment, which is more effective when people don’t interrupt their time in the chamber.

Prospective patients don’t need a referral and can call the St. Charles center at 631-465-2950 to schedule an appointment.

By Heidi Sutton

The Greater Port Jefferson Chamber of Commerce hosted its 13th annual Port Jeff Health & Wellness Fest at The Meadow Club in Port Jefferson Station on April 23. The event featured over 50 vendors, health screenings, live music, a painting demonstration by Muse Paint Bar, a vegan BBQ food court courtesy of Catholic Health, a visit from therapy donkeys Pop-E and Lil-E from EEAW and Kota the comfort dog from Moloney Funeral Home, and lots of free giveaways. The wonderful event attracted hundreds of visitors interested in the many local services available in staying healthy in 2022.

Photos by Heidi Sutton

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Dr. Kanika Kaur

Colorectal cancer is the third most common cancer and the second leading cause of cancer death in the United States, yet it is one of the most preventable types of cancer. For 2021, the National Cancer Institute reported nearly 150,000 new cases diagnosed with approximately 53,000 fatalities. Affecting men and women of all racial and ethnic groups, colorectal cancer is most often found in people age 50 and older.

One of the biggest challenges physicians face when discussing colorectal cancer is debunking myths surrounding identifying and treating the disease. Catholic Health Gastroenterologist Kanika Kaur, MD, addressed what she commonly hears from patients.

Myth: There is nothing I can do to lessen my risk of colon cancer.

Fact: There is a lot people can do to reduce their risk of colon cancer. A diet low in red meat and processed meat, high in fruits and vegetables is very important. Smoking is a well-known risk factor for colon cancer along with many other cancers. Also, regular exercise may reduce your risk of developing colorectal cancer. The single biggest modifiable risk factor for colorectal cancer is failure to be screened. Colorectal cancers develop from pre-cancerous polyps, which are growths on the lining of the colon and rectum. Screenings detect and allow doctors to remove polyps before they become cancerous.  Colonoscopy with polyp removal reduces the risk of developed colon cancer by up to 90%

Myth: Colorectal cancer is fatal.

Fact: Colorectal cancer is highly treatable, especially when detected early. More than 90% of patients with a localized cancer that is confined to the colon or rectum are alive five years after diagnosis. Sadly, about only one-third of colorectal cancers are diagnosed at an early stage. A majority of cases are identified when the disease has spread beyond the wall of the colon or rectum and to other parts of the body. This decreases the chances of the cancer being cured.

Myth: I should only have a screening if I have symptoms.

Fact: This is false. The reality is that early colorectal cancer usually has no symptoms. This is why it is important to get screened. It is recommended all men and women age 45 and older should have a screening. Those with a personal or family history of colon cancer, a history of inflammatory bowel disease and those with symptoms such as rectal bleeding are considered at high risk and may need to be screened before the age of 45. Additionally, women with a personal or family history of ovarian, endometrial or breast cancer may also need to be screened at an earlier age.

Myth: Only those with a family history of colon cancer are at risk.

Fact: Nearly three-quarters of all new colorectal cancer cancers are with individuals with no known risk factors for the disease.

Myth: Colorectal cancer affects only older, white men.

Fact: Colorectal cancer impacts men and women. Additionally, people of color are more likely to be diagnosed with colorectal cancer in its advanced stages, suggesting that they may require colon cancer screening at a younger age.

Myth: A colonoscopy is a difficult procedure.

Fact: A colonoscopy is not painful. The most unpleasant part of the procedure is the preparation that is required the day before the exam. But this is important as an inadequate prep may lead to missed findings such as polyps or a need to repeat the procedure.

Myth: Finding a colon or rectal polyp means I have cancer and need surgery.

Fact: A polyp is a pre-cancerous lesion that, if not treated, can progress to cancer. If polyps are detected early and removed before they can progress, colon cancer can be prevented. Colonoscopy and sigmoidoscopy have been shown to prevent deaths from colon cancer – a fact that has been well demonstrated over time. Most polyps are treated by removing them during the colonoscopy. Even large polyps can be removed without surgery. 

More information on Catholic Health’s comprehensive colorectal cancer and digestive health services may be found by visiting chsli.org. To find a Catholic Health physician near you, please call (866) MY-LI-DOC.

About Catholic Health

Catholic Health is an integrated system encompassing some of the region’s finest health and human services agencies. The health system has 16,000 employees, six acute care hospitals, three nursing homes, a home health service, hospice and a network of physician practices.

Rogovitz with his son Gene and his grandson Gavin surfing at Gilgo Beach in Babylon. Photo from Rogovitz

Charles Rogovitz hopes to get bottom dentures so he can relieve the stomach pain he gets from partially chewed food and can eat an apple again. Todd Warren needs to have a root canal to become eligible for a new kidney. 

Rogovitz and Warren are two of the veterans who will attend free Port Jefferson-based St. Charles Hospital’s “Give Vets a Smile” clinic on Nov. 3.

The event, which has become biannual this year and is fully booked, will provide dental care for 20 to 25 veterans.

Currently sponsored by a grant from Mother Cabrini Foundation, St. Charles has been providing an annual dental clinic for veterans since 2016.

“Our goal is to reach out to the [veterans] who do not have traditional insurance through employers,” and who “fall through the cracks,” Dr. Keri Logan, director in the Department of Dentistry at St. Charles, explained in an email. “That includes veterans who are not 100% disabled and perhaps make too much money for Medicaid, those that are homeless and the like.”

St. Charles hopes to “get as much done for them as possible,” which means that appointments typically include a visit with a hygienist as well as a dentist, Dr. Logan added.

Dr. Logan explained that veterans who do not have insurance or the means to go to a dentist regularly for routine cleanings and treatment have an increased incidence of cavities, infections and/or periodontal disease.

The event is in memory of Mark Cherches, who spent 57 years at St. Charles Hospital’s Dental Clinic and played a key role in bringing Give Veterans a Smile day to the hospital.

Dr. Cherches “heard of this from another facility a few years back and he was instrumental in giving us the idea,” Dr. Logan explained.

St. Charles is hosting the event at the Stephen B. Gold Dental Clinic.

Ruth Gold, wife of the late Stephen Gold, who was a pediatric dentist and for whom the clinic is named, appreciates the fact that the clinic is expanding with outreach programs to help the community.

The daughter of World War II veteran Milton Kalish, Gold is thankful for members of the armed forces who are “defending our country.”

Gold added that her husband would be “pleased” with the effort. “These are people who wouldn’t ordinarily go out to get their teeth checked, so this is very important.”

Rogovitz

Indeed, Rogovitz hasn’t been to a dentist in a quarter of a century.

A retired contractor who was a sergeant in the Marine Corps in Vietnam in 1967, 1968 and 1969, Rogovitz has lost his bottom teeth over the years, pulling them out when they come loose.

A resident of Babylon Village, Rogovitz has visited dentists, who estimated that it would cost $2,400 and about eight months to provide dentures for his lower jaw. He also needs dentures on his upper jaw.

“I’m hoping for the best,” Rogovitz said. “Worst comes to worst, I’ll get a lower denture and I’ll be able to masticate my food properly and not have stomach issues.”

Rogovitz has circled Nov. 3 on his calendar with highlighter in multiple colors.

The retired marine has been eating soft foods.

Rogovitz owes his life to his son Gene, who urged him to see a doctor for a general checkup in 2016. The doctor found early stage prostate cancer, which is in remission.

Rogovitz is convinced he developed cancer during his service in Vietnam, when he was given a bag of defoliant and was told to rip it open and scatter it in the grass. 

In addition, he lay in fields sprayed with Agent Orange.

Despite his health battles, Rogovitz, who calls himself a “young 74,” enjoys surfing with his son and his nine-year-old grandson, Gavin.

In addition to biting into an apple, which he hasn’t done in about 12 years, he hopes to chew on an ear of corn on the cob.

Warren

A veteran of the Navy who went on three deployments during Desert Storm, Warren has received dialysis three days a week for over 18 months.

Warren, whose rank was Petty Officer 2nd Class E5, would like to join the list for a kidney transplant.

“You have to be cleared by all these departments first,” said Warren, who is a resident of Bay Shore. “One of them is dental.”

Unable to do much walking in part because of his kidney and in part because of his congestive heart failure, Warren can’t join the organ recipient list until he has root canal.

“All of that is holding me up,” Warren said. “I have to get this root canal to get this kidney transplant.”

While St. Charles Hospital can’t guarantee any specific treatment, the dental clinic does offer root canal work as a part of that day’s free dental service for veterans.

Warren, who is 53, has sole custody of his nine-year-old son, Malachi. 

An athlete in high school who played basketball and soccer and ran track, Warren is limited in what he can do with his son in his current condition.

Warren had two teeth extracted at the Veterans Administration and is also hoping to fill that hole. When he drinks, he sometimes struggles to control the flow of liquid, causing him to choke on soda or water.

“I’m trying to do the best I can” with the missing teeth in the bottom of his mouth and the need for a root canal in the top, he said.

On behalf of himself and other veterans, Warren is grateful to St. Charles Hospital.

“I appreciate what they’re doing,” Warren said. “Let’s take care of the vets who were willing to put their lives on the line for this country.”

Image from Old Westbury Gardens
Catholic Health signs on as presenting sponsor of inaugural event designed to immerse visitors in a spectacular outdoor experience

Next month, Old Westbury Gardens will unveil a first-of-its kind nighttime light show event. SHIMMERING SOLSTICE at Old Westbury Gardens, presented by Catholic Health, will offer visitors the opportunity to behold a series of magical light displays as they walk along the beautiful meandering paths through Old Westbury Gardens’ Walled Garden, Rose Garden, South Lawn, and Allée.

Tickets are on sale now. The event opens November 20, 2021 and runs through January 9, 2022. The admission time starts at 5:30 p.m. and the last admission is at 9:30 p.m. The gates close at 11 p.m.

“We are excited to offer this brand-new experience for our visitors to enjoy,” said Nancy Costopulos, President and CEO of Old Westbury Gardens. “This walkthrough lightshow has been designed specifically for Old Westbury Gardens and offers a one-of-a-kind experience that we intend to become a new annual holiday tradition. We are also thrilled to have Catholic Health as our presenting sponsor for this inaugural event. Their commitment to the communities they serve mirrors our own, and we welcome their support as we bring this spectacular event to Long Island.”

SHIMMERING SOLSTICE is a completely custom-built show that has been uniquely designed to highlight the features of Old Westbury Gardens. The design phase took approximately a-year-and-a-half to plan.

“Catholic Health is proud to be Old Westbury Gardens’ SHIMMERING SOLSTICE presenting sponsor,” said Patrick M. O’Shaughnessy, DO, MBA, President & CEO of Catholic Health. “This experience will bring families, friends, and communities together in a beautiful setting to reflect and make memories. Catholic Health cherishes the value of families and communities, and we continue to be humbled in contributing to moments in life that matter.”

The event was developed out of a desire to creatively adapt the land and gardens around Westbury House into a visitor location that can be enjoyed during the fall and winter holiday season and that would remain consistent with the mission of Old Westbury Gardens.

“This is a celebration of our space,” said Maura McGoldrick-Brush, Director of Horticulture at Old Westbury Gardens. “Instead of flowers, the gardens will be blooming with light. This is truly an enchanting combination of the beauty of the gardens and the magic of the season.”

Old Westbury Gardens worked with Lightswitch, a collective of internationally recognized lighting, media, and visual designers to create the show with the intent of celebrating the Gardens’ history and environment during the fall and winter seasons.

“The design will truly embrace the Gardens,” said Warren Kong, principal at Lightswitch. “The goal is to create something that is unique. We wanted to give people something they can’t see down the street from their homes and create a new family tradition for the region.”

Some examples of what visitors will see include both the formal Rose Garden and Walled Garden blooming with beautiful light and twinkling in lively rhythmic patterns. Other unique features include enormous dandelions which will line the edge of the pond and a giant Christmas tree, made of lit globes, that will be displayed in front of Westbury House. Many other impressive light displays will be found throughout the iconic garden areas for visitors to discover.

This event is something people of all ages will enjoy. The walk-through portion of the show is designed for visitors to explore at their own pace. For the exciting finale, visitors will be dazzled to see the south facade of Westbury House come alive as they become immersed in a magical and wondrous sensation of lights and sounds, celebrating the spirit of the season.

For more information, visit the SHIMMERING SOLSTICE website: https://shimmeringsolstice.com/

See video here.

About Old Westbury Gardens

Built in 1906 and listed on the National Register of Historic Places, Old Westbury Gardens is the former home of John S. Phipps, his wife, Margarita Grace Phipps, and their children. Today, as a not-for-profit organization, Old Westbury Gardens welcomes visitors of all ages for a wide range of historical, cultural, artistic, educational, horticultural events. Old Westbury Gardens seeks to inspire appreciation of the early 20th century American country estate through faithful preservation and interpretation of its landscape, gardens, architecture and collections. For more information, visit https://www.oldwestburygardens.org/

 

About Catholic Healh

Catholic Health is an integrated system encompassing some of the region’s finest health and human services agencies. The health system has nearly 17,000 employees, 6 acute care hospitals, 3 nursing homes, a home nursing service, hospice and a network of physician practices. For more information, visit https://www.chsli.org.

Photo by Julianne Mosher

Congressman Lee Zeldin (R-NY1) rallied with health care workers to boycott Gov. Kathy Hochul’s (D) vaccination deadline, Sept. 27.

Zeldin, who is campaigning for governor, joined other elected officials outside the state building in Hauppauge Monday just hours before health care workers were required to get the COVID-19 vaccine by midnight or risk losing their jobs.

On Monday night, Hochul signed an executive order to significantly expand the eligible workforce and allow additional health care workers to administer COVID-19 testing and vaccinations. 

According to the mandate, if health care workers do not receive at least one dose of one of the COVID-19 vaccines by the end of day Monday — without a medical exemption or having previously filed for a religious exemption — they will forfeit their jobs. 

The congressman has been vocal over the mandates, locally and nationally. 

“Our health care workers were nothing short of heroic the past 18 months,” Zeldin said. “We shouldn’t be firing these essential workers. We should be thanking them for all they’ve done for our communities.”

Zeldin was calling on Hochul to work with medical facilities and the state’s health care workers to “implement a more reasonable policy that does not violate personal freedoms, fire health care workers who helped us through the pandemic’s worst days, and cause chaos and staffing shortages at hospitals and nursing homes.”

Hochul stated this week that to fill the vacancies in hospitals, she plans to bring in the National Guard and other out-of-state health care workers to replace those who refuse to get vaccinated.

“You’re either vaccinated and can keep your job, or you’re out on the street,” said Zeldin, who is vaccinated.

State Sen. Mario Mattera (R-St. James) said he was angered when health care employees were given limited ability to negotiate the vaccine mandate through their unions.

“This isn’t a state of emergency, like a hurricane,” he said. “This is a state of emergency that people get fired, and not going to have unemployment insurance. I am a union leader. This is a disgrace to all Americans.”

According to the state Department of Labor, unvaccinated workers who are terminated from their jobs will not be eligible for unemployment insurance benefits. A new Republican-led bill introduced in Albany would restore those jobless benefits.

On Tuesday, the state released data noting the percentage of hospital staff receiving at least one dose was 92% (as of Monday evening) based on preliminary self-reported data. The percentage of fully vaccinated was 85% as of Monday evening, up from 84% on Sept. 22 and 77% on Aug. 24.

 “This new information shows that holding firm on the vaccine mandate for health care workers is simply the right thing to do to protect our vulnerable family members and loved ones from COVID-19,” Hochul said in a statement. “I am pleased to see that health care workers are getting vaccinated to keep New Yorkers safe, and I am continuing to monitor developments and ready to take action to alleviate potential staffing shortage situations in our health care systems.”

Long Island’s three health care providers have already implemented the mandate and are taking action. 

Northwell Health, the state’s largest private employer and health care provider — and which includes Port Jefferson’s Mather Hospital and Huntington Hospital — previously notified all unvaccinated team members that they are no longer in compliance with New York State’s mandate to vaccinate all health care workers by the Sept. 27 deadline.

“Northwell regrets losing any employee under such circumstances, but as health care professionals and members of the largest health care provider in the state, we understand our unique responsibility to protect the health of our patients and each other,” Northwell said in a statement. “We owe it to our staff, our patients and the communities we serve to be 100% vaccinated against COVID-19.”

Catholic Health Executive Vice President and Chief Medical Officer Jason Golbin said in a statement that the provider is “incredibly proud of our staff’s dedication to protecting the health and safety of Long Islanders during the COVID-19 pandemic and are grateful for their heroic efforts over the last 18 months.”

He added, “In keeping with our commitment to ensuring the health and safety of our patients, visitors, medical staff and employees, we are complying with the New York State vaccine mandate for all health care workers.”

Golbin said that as of Tuesday, Sept. 28, the vast majority of staff is fully vaccinated with only a few hundred people furloughed from across six hospitals, three nursing facilities, home health care, hospice and other physician practices. 

Stony Brook University officials added Stony Brook medicine has been preparing for New York State’s mandate all healthcare workers get at least one dose of the COVID-19 vaccine by the deadline. 

As of 8 p.m. on Sept. 28, 94.07% of Stony Brook University Hospital employees have been vaccinated, and this number continues to increase, 134 Stony Brook University Hospital employees are being placed on suspension without pay and will be scheduled to meet with Labor Relations representatives to discuss their circumstances. While awaiting this meeting, they can use vacation or holiday time off. If they continue to elect not to receive the vaccine, they will be terminated in accordance with the NYS DOH order. 

Less than 1% of the hospital’s total employee population are in a probationary employment period and while they are currently suspended without pay, they are still eligible to be vaccinated before their terminations are processed and could still return to work. 

Officials said these numbers are fluid and are expecting further declines.

From left to right: Middle Island Fire Chief Bill Nevin, Chuck Prentis, Dr. Jeffrey Wheeler, Nursing Assistant Drew Saidler. Photo from Catholic Health

Chuck Prentis, 59 of Centerport, was at the right place at the right time this past May, when he was bicycle riding up a very steep hill in Port Jefferson and suddenly went into cardiac arrest in front of St. Charles Hospital on Belle Terre Road.

All of the stars aligned that day for Prentis. St. Charles nursing assistant Drew Saidler was in the emergency room and heard the outside cries for help. He immediately sprang into action and performed life-saving CPR on the lawn where the rider had fallen from his bicycle. 

A St. Charles security officer alerted the emergency room staff of the incident and the medical team immediately ran out to assist Saidler. At the same time, Middle Island Fire Chief Bill Nevin happened to be driving by the scene at that very moment, jumped out of his car with an automated external defibrillator. 

Prentis was placed on a stretcher, with nurse Kirsten Connolly on top, performing life-saving compressions as Chuck was being rushed into the emergency room.

As it turns out, Chuck suffered from a widow maker which is the most severe kind of heart attack, where there is almost 100% total blockage in a critical blood vessel called the left anterior descending artery. 

Prentis has a family history of heart disease. His father passed away at a young age of a heart attack, his older brother had open heart surgery and also survived a widow maker and his older sister required a stenting procedure due to blockages. 

Knowing that he had a family history, he lived a healthy lifestyle and exercised frequently on the Peloton bike – about 130 miles a week. He never had any symptoms prior to that day in May when he went into sudden cardiac arrest. 

Once stabilized at St. Charles, Chuck also required another procedure to implant an Impella device typically used in patients with severe heart failure, to help flow of blood to the heart.

Prentis is not quite back on the Peloton, but for now enjoys playing golf and spending quality time with his wife and three sons. He and his family are extremely appreciative of the emergency room staff who sprang into action that day. Each one was instrumental in saving his life. One might say, it is a miracle that Prentis was at the right place at the right time and received the lifesaving care he desperately needed.

Dominick Pernice. Photo from St. Catherine of Siena

Dominick Pernice, RT, MBA, has been named chief operating officer at Catholic Health’s St. Catherine of Siena Hospital (SCSH). For the past 13 years, Mr. Pernice has served as the administrative director of imaging services and cardiac catheterization at SCSH and St. Charles Hospital in Port Jefferson. 

In his new role, Mr. Pernice will oversee SCSH’s daily hospital operational and administrative functions; design and implement business strategies, plans and procedures; set comprehensive goals for performance and growth across all clinical services lines; and continue to ensure patient safety and patient satisfaction. 

“We are very fortunate to have Mr. Pernice as part of St. Catherine’s senior leadership team,” said James O’Connor, SCSH president. “Over Mr. Pernice’s long career at St. Catherine and St. Charles hospitals, he has proven his steadfast leadership, strategic planning and keen decision-making skills in addressing various operational issues. In addition, Mr. Pernice was instrumental in developing the imaging services at Ambulatory Care in Commack. As St. Catherine’s COO, Mr. Pernice will further enhance our hospital’s mission in providing the highest quality of care to our patients.”

Prior to joining Catholic Health, Mr. Pernice served as assistant director of radiology, supervisor of magnetic resonance imaging and ultrasound, evening imaging supervisor and radiologic technologist at Long Island Jewish Medical Center in New Hyde Park. Mr. Pernice earned his Master of Business Administration at C.W. Post University and is a Six Sigma Green Belt.