Tags Posts tagged with "sale"

sale

Graffiti, broken windows discovered on the property Aug. 27

Shoreham-Wading River School District is preparing to seek proposals for the sale or lease of the Briarcliff Elementary School building. Photo by Kyle Barr

Shoreham-Wading River School District has announced it’s in the final stages of exploring a sale of the vacant Briarcliff Elementary School building and property after it was vandalized with graffiti and windows were broken Aug. 26.

The school district posted a notice to its website Aug. 29 saying it had started the process of publicizing a request for proposals about a sale or lease of the property and that it will be submitted to the board at its Sept. 25 meeting.

Graffiti found on the vacant Briarcliff Elementary School building Aug. 27. Photo by Kyle Barr

“As a follow up to the feedback received during the public workshops the district held last winter and spring, the board of education is in the early stages of exploring the possible lease or sale of the facility with the help of a specialized real estate agent identified through a RFP process,” the district said in a statement. “No final decision on this matter has been made to this date as an RFP is in the development stages.”

Briarcliff Elementary School closed its doors in 2014. It was built in 1907. Since its closure, the district has had to pay for ongoing operating costs — approximately $95,000 annually, according to the district.

In April, district officials sat down with residents in round-table discussions about possible options for the Briarcliff property located on Briarcliff Road in Shoreham. While many residents said they would like to keep the property in the district’s hands, such as moving either the library or district offices to that location, officials stated there was very little they could use the building for. The school board voted to create an RFP on a sale of the property at its June 26 meeting.

Graffiti found on the vacant Briarcliff Elementary School building Aug. 27. Photo by Kyle Barr

The announcement of the intent to sell comes a few days after the property was vandalized. A member of the Shoreham/Wading River Community Facebook group posted photos at about noon Aug. 26 showing graffiti along the rear end of the property closest to the field and playground. One door labeled “16” had been pulled open and two windows right next to it had been smashed.

The graffiti was largely random, some showing expletives. One message read “make out hill,” and another said “Hallow (sic) Point,” most likely misspelling “hollow point.” The windows that were broken had already been boarded up with metal plates and the door relocked by Aug. 29.

The school district called the police at approximately 1:30 p.m. the same day, a spokesperson for Suffolk County police said. Later that afternoon the district put a notice on its website saying it was working with law enforcement in an ongoing investigation.

“The District takes matters of safety and security very seriously,” district officials said in a statement. “Briarcliff, like each of our schools, is monitored through video surveillance, by members of our district staff and through the use of an alarm system. The district is cooperating with members of law enforcement to the fullest extent possible.”

Graffiti found on the vacant Briarcliff Elementary School building Aug. 27. Photo by Kyle Barr

The building already has a number of security cameras along its facade. One is located on the main entrance, another at the entrance to the trailers on the northern part of the property and another behind the property. Though there are also flood lights located on the roof of the property facing the back field.

Shoreham resident Lisa Geraghty has been following the ongoing Briarcliff story for more than a year, and she said she understands the tough decisions the school board had to make on the property.

“The nearly $100,000 annual cost to maintain the building with just enough winter heat to prevent the pipes from freezing and occasional mowing and security checks could never cover the amount of work the building needs,” Geraghty said. “The six-figure maintenance cost isn’t enough to cover steady security.”

The district will be hosting its next school board meeting Sept. 4.

File photo by Victoria Espinoza

Suffolk County police have arrested five people after conducting inspections within the 4th Precinct April 14.

In response to recent complaints throughout the 4th Precinct, Crime Section officers conducted investigations into the sale of e-liquid nicotine and alcohol to minors at 17 businesses, utilizing underage agents.

The following individuals were arrested and issued Field Appearance Tickets:

  • Shah Asif, 44, of Bay Shore, at Shell gas station at 642 Motor Parkway in Brentwood was charged with one count of second-degree unlawfully dealing.
  • James Flone, 54, of Smithtown, at The Smoke Shop at 403 Smithtown Blvd. in Nesconset was charged with one count of second-degree unlawfully dealing and one count of first-degree unlawfully dealing.
  • Mohammes Khan, of Flushing, Queens, 58 , at Aroma Smoke Shop at 6 East Main Street in Smithtown, was charged with two counts of second-degree unlawfully dealing.
  • Wenwen Liu, 33, of East Meadow, at Smithtown Wines and Spirits at 67 Route 111 in Smithtown, was charged with two counts of first-degree unlawfully dealing.
  • Giovanni Galeano, 26, of Central Islip, at Krypton Smoke Shop at 260 Smithtown Blvd. in Nesconset was charged with two counts of second-degree unlawfully dealing.

The following businesses complied and refused the sale of e-liquid nicotine and/or alcohol to minors:

  • 7-Eleven at 2045 Jericho Turnpike in Commack
  • 7-Eleven at 362 Veterans Highway in Commerce
  • BP gas station at 2840 Pond Road in Ronkonkoma
  • BP gas station at 402 Rosevale Ave. in Ronkonkoma
  • Bullseye Wholesale Beverage at 395A Middle Country Road in Smithtown
  • Citgo Mini Mart at 440 Hawkins Ave. in Ronkonkoma
  • Cloud Vape and Smoke at 55 NY-111 in Smithtown
  • One Stop Deli Inc. at 408 Rosevale Ave. in Ronkonkoma
  • Exxon at 323 Jericho Turnpike in Smithtown
  • Shell gas station at 444 Commack Road in Commack
  • Shell gas station at 560 Middle Country Road in Smithtown
  • Suffolk Vape & Smoke at 165A Terry Road in Nesconset

All defendants are scheduled for arraignment June 18 at First District Court in Central Islip.

Smithtown school district's administrative New York Avenue building. File photo by Rachel Shapiro

By Kevin Redding

The Smithtown school board is not yet sold on a proposal by the town to buy its administration building on New York Avenue and surrounding property to turn them into municipality offices and a central park.

“The Board of Education has made no decision as to what direction it wishes to pursue with respect to the New York Avenue property,” said the Smithtown school board in a statement Sept. 19.

This comes months after the Smithtown Town Board issued an appraisal of the administration building to the school board for its review in order to kick-start a negotiation process as quickly as possible.

Councilman Tom McCarthy (R), who proposed the town purchase the property to help boost its downtown revitalization efforts, said during a Sept. 5 town board meeting the school’s decision to not sell the property or meet with council members to discuss the topic at this time meant the town could not move forward with anything.

He also suggested the board not proceed with its original plans to appraise six buildings — existing satellite-buildings utilized as office space by town departments — which would be vacated if services could be consolidated into one centralized location on the New York Avenue property.

Nesconset resident William Holst disagreed.

“I would strongly recommend looking at getting those appraisals done, looking at those buildings in terms of being consolidated, [and] reducing the number of buildings in the downtown area so you actually can generate some real revitalization in this area,” Holst said during the meeting.

McCarthy responded by calling the $20,000 for appraisals a waste of taxpayer money at this time.

“To spend money when they really aren’t interested at this time [to sell us the building] wouldn’t be prudent,” McCarthy said.

The councilman said that he has reached out to members of the school board in an attempt to try to schedule a future meeting.

“If we can get them to the bargaining table, I’m sure this board would be more than happy to do the appraisals on our outlying buildings,” McCarthy said.

In an interview Sept. 18, McCarthy said, “It’s in limbo right now but I would get moving on it tomorrow if they got back to us, which I hope they do. I think they’re looking at it from a monetary standpoint for themselves and doing their due diligence. They’re a good board.”

Smithtown resident Bob Hughes, a member of the civics New York Avenue Group and Smithtown United, said he has unofficially acted as an intermediary between the two boards since last year to help them find common ground on the matter.

Hughes believes school board members are holding out on a decision until after town elections are over “so they don’t have to deal with two possible town boards.”

“Once we get past November, there probably will be more interaction between the school and town,” Hughes said, holding out hope the project will move forward soon. “It’s about what the community wants. The New York Avenue property could be a focal point of the downtown revitalization and improve efficiency.”

Social

9,206FansLike
0FollowersFollow
1,116FollowersFollow
33SubscribersSubscribe