Tags Posts tagged with "Kitties"

Kitties

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Save-A-Pet kittens are up for adoption at the annual Kitten Shower. Photo by Giselle Barkley

Save-A-Pet Animal Rescue and Adoption Center is hosting its annual Kitten Shower on Saturday, Oct. 3, offering felines for adoption.

The event, at the shelter on Route 112 in Port Jefferson Station, will run from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m., when kittens can be adopted for $50. The furry friends are all spayed or neutered, are up-to-date with their vaccines and have had flea prevention treatment applied.

Refreshments will be served.

The shelter is also requesting donations of much-needed supplies, like canned kitten food, Purina Kitten Chow, and kitten milk replacement, for kittens in local foster homes.

For more information or to learn how to volunteer for the nonprofit organization, call Save-A-Pet at 631-473-6333.

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Wilbur

By Ernestine Franco

In 2012, the Sound Beach Civic Association hosted its first annual Pet Adopt-A-Thon. More than 200 people attended and many animals found new, loving homes. Fast forward three years and the event is still going strong, fulfilling its goal of encouraging responsible pet ownership and providing a venue for local rescue groups to get animals adopted.

Max
Max

Don’t miss the 4th annual Sound Beach Civic Association Pet Adopt-A-Thon on Saturday, Sept. 26, from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m., in the Hartlin Inn parking lot, 30 New York Ave., Sound Beach, across from the Post Office.

Whether you’re looking to adopt, would like to support the great work of animal welfare groups, or just want to have a family-friendly fun day in Sound Beach, stop by.

The animal welfare groups participating in this event take unwanted, abandoned, abused, or stray animals and care for them until loving homes can be found. Some groups are bringing adoptable pets, and others will have information on adoptable pets as well as responsible pet care.

For the third year, Animal Rescue Fund of the Hamptons adoption van will be there filled with cats and dogs looking for new homes. Also taking part will be the Adoption Center, Friends of Freddie, Grateful Greyhounds, Last Chance Animal Rescue, Long Island Bulldog Rescue, Paws Unite People, Regina Quinn Legacy Fund, Save-A-Pet, and Brookhaven Town Animal Shelter. Miller Place Animal Hospital will offer a free exam for any forever friend adopted that day.

There will be lots of great raffle auction prizes — donations still being accepted — and a 50/50, with all proceeds going to the participating animal welfare groups. Bring your children for face painting by Jen Chiodo of Jen Chi Faces. Enjoy the music of Gina Mingoia and Sal Martone from 1 to 3 p.m. “They’re really talented,” said Bea Ruberto, president of the civic,” and we’re so grateful that, for the third year, they’re willing to take time away from their busy schedule to help make the day so special.”

And, of course, come and meet your new best friend. There’s a shelter cat or dog waiting to meet you.

Wilbur the tabby cat was rescued by Save-A-Pet after being run over by a car. He had a broken pelvis and is now afraid to move. He needs a caring friend to help him work through the pain. Also at Save-A-Pet, Malibu lived outside, chained, for the three years she has been on this planet. She has had several litters that all have been placed and now she needs a place to call home.

Blossom
Blossom

Guardians of Rescue, supporters of Save-A-Pet, rescued Max and Hera, the two gorgeous, sweet malamutes pictured on the right. The duo have bonded and the hope is that they can be adopted together.

Another duo who would like to be placed together are the mother and son pitbull team, Rory and Dean, who came to the Brookhaven Town Aniaml Shelter with a skin condition. They have been treated and are ready to be placed in a home. Blossom, a true “nanny dog” who loves everyone she meets, has lived at the town shelter for two years and now she too needs a loving home.

Also pictured are two adorable kittens rescued by Volunteers for Animal Welfare. They were found in dire need of veterinary care and a safe haven. Like so many others you’ll meet if you stop by, all they need is a forever home.

You’ll also meet some newly rescued greyhounds. As I write this, Grateful Greyhounds will be getting several of these gentle giants from the race track and then they will be vet-checked and evaluated. The oldest breed known to man, greyhounds are very docile, gentle and friendly.

Admission is free and all are welcome. For more information call 631-744-6952 and remember, Save A Life — Adopt A Pet.

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By Matthew Kearns, DVM

In the Aug. 13 article we focused on the causes of chronic otitis externa (external ear infections). This article will focus on treatment. First, relieve yourself of the guilt that you did not treat the “infection” correctly. If your pet has chronic ear infections, that usually indicates some predisposing factor (usually genetic in origin). Second, get over the frustration of assuming that because we veterinarians use the term “ear infection” that if treated once, it will never return. 

Chronic otitis externa is a problem that can be managed, not cured.  Therefore, general maintenance of the ear is much better than waiting for things to get out of control. Talk to your veterinarian about ear cleaners, or if you look for an ear cleaner at the pet store make sure it states that it is a cleaner and a drying agent. This means it will have some isopropyl alcohol and usually propylene glycol to not only break up the wax but also to dry the lining of the ear canal.

Those dogs (or cats) that produce excessive wax should have their ears cleaned regularly (once to twice weekly).  If your pet’s ears are really inflamed/infected, you will need medication from your veterinarian to get things under control. However, once the infection clears up, maintenance cleaning is imperative. I have many a pet owner tell me how guilty they feel about cleaning their pet’s ears because they know it hurts and the pet runs away.

However, these same owners usually wait until there is a full-blown infection. Therefore, it is much easier to clean the ears when there is no infection, as compared to waiting until the lining of the ear canal is inflamed and sensitive.  Remember, “an ounce of prevention…”

There are some cases that get so out of hand that your veterinarian may suggest sedating your pet to obtain samples for testing (ear cultures, etc.), as well as a deep ear flush to evaluate the ear drum and the middle ear behind it. Although the problem may originate in the external ear canal, it can progress to a middle ear infection (otitis media) and systemic medication may be indicated. 

Talk to your veterinarian about exploring the underlying causes of the ear infection. As we discussed in the previous article, it is estimated that 80 to 90 percent of recurrent ear infections are secondary to allergies. Newer, more accurate blood tests can diagnose food allergies, seasonal allergies or both. Avoiding certain foods (including treats), as well as managing seasonal allergies can decrease (or sometimes eliminate altogether) the need for cleaning the ears at all. 

As a last resort, there are two surgical procedures that can be performed in severe cases. The first is called a lateral ear canal ablation. This procedure reconstructs a portion of the external ear canal so it more resembles a human ear canal. This allows better airflow and makes cleaning and treatment easier.

The second procedure is called a total ear canal ablation and bulla osteotomy, or TECA-BO (pronounced, “teeka-boo”) for short. This is reserved for end-stage ear canals where over the years so much scar tissue has developed, no medication can be introduced into the canal. This procedure involves removing the entire external ear canal and part of the middle ear as well.

A percentage of patients lose their hearing, but it will eliminate a significant source of chronic pain. The good news is that in almost every case, the patient is deaf before the surgery secondary to chronic disease. 

I hope this sheds a little light on a confusing (and sometimes frustrating) disease in pets. 

Dr. Kearns has been in practice for 16 years and is pictured with his son, Matthew, his dog, Jasmine.