Tags Posts tagged with "estate plan"

estate plan

Stock photo

By Nancy Burner, Esq.

Nancy Burner, Esq.

When planning for the differently abled, the use of supplemental needs trusts as part of your estate planning will ensure that you have provided protections for those with special needs and disabilities.

When considering your estate planning, it is important to consider any beneficiaries who may have special needs or disabilities. Receiving an outright inheritance could negatively affect these individuals, as oftentimes they are entitled to, and receive, need-based government benefits such as SSI, Medicaid and Group Housing, to name a few, which either supplement or fully cover the living and medical expenses of the individual.

Safeguarding these benefits by using supplemental needs trusts rather than an outright distribution can ensure that you can leave funds to a loved one who has special needs without the risk of interfering with their government benefits.

Supplemental needs trusts can be established as “first-party” or “third-party trusts.” This article highlights third-party supplemental needs trusts which are, simply stated, trusts funded with the assets of a third-party, anyone other than the differently abled individual.

To understand the difference, first-party trusts are funded with the assets or income of the differently abled person and are often used to safeguard benefits after the individual receives an inheritance or some other windfall. First-party supplemental needs trusts are also often used to protect money that was in the name of the individual at the onset of a disability. 

First-party supplemental needs trusts are available to persons under the age of 65, and thanks to recent legislation, can be created by the individual him or herself, a parent, guardian or through the court. Although a terrific planning tool, when possible it is preferable to address these planning needs ahead of time to ensure no interruption of benefits and a maximum preservation of assets. 

The first-party trust requires a payback provision which dictates that any monies that remain in the trust at the time of the individual’s death must be paid to the state in an amount equal to the medical assistance paid on behalf of the individual. 

Third-party supplemental needs trusts can either stand alone or be incorporated into your estate planning. These trusts can be created by anyone for the benefit of the disabled individual. They can be funded upon creation or can be prepared with the idea of funding at the time of the death of the creator.

The assets in the trust can be used to provide the individual with comforts they would otherwise not be able to afford. Because these trusts are set up with the fund of a third party, unlike the first-party supplemental needs trusts, they do not have a payback provision.

Upon the death of the original beneficiary of the trust, whatever assets remain in the trust can be distributed in accordance with the grantor’s wishes. By leaving assets in a supplemental needs trust, you would be able to provide for your loved one and ensure the continuation of imperative benefit on which he or she relies.

It is important to note that funds between a first-party trust and a third-party trust should never be co-mingled. Specifically, if monies which originated with the disabled individual go into a third-party trust, the protections afforded to third-party trusts (i.e., no payback provision) may extinguish and a payback could be required. 

Overall, supplemental needs trusts are invaluable for planning for those differently abled. The trusts can enhance the quality of life for the person and supplement the benefits he or she is already receiving.

Nancy Burner, Esq. practices elder law and estate planning from her East Setauket office.

By Nancy Burner, Esq.

Nancy Burner, Esq.

The best way to manage your own affairs while you are alive and to provide properly for your beneficiaries at your death is to have an estate plan. There is a distinction between having a “plan” and having documents. The close attention to detail, knowledge of the law and past experiences of the attorney you are dealing with should help you create the plan that fits your own circumstances.

The first step of the process is to gather a comprehensive list of your assets. Since everything in the plan is different depending on the personal circumstances, it is important for the attorney advising you to know what type of assets you have and in what quantity. An individual with a home worth $400,000 may require a very different plan than an individual with the same amount of assets that are held in cash or retirement accounts. 

Once you have your list of assets together, you can review it with the attorney and discuss the goals of the representation. For many clients, the primary goal is to make sure they are taken care of during their own lifetime with the maximum amount of control over their assets without concern for what happens upon their death, while others may have concern for those they wish to benefit at their death.  

Take the single mother with a disabled child; while she is concerned about her own well-being, she would likely consider the well-being of her child to be equally as important. By contrast, a single person with no children will have different concerns and, therefore, a different estate plan. 

Discussing your goals with an attorney is the greatest value the attorney can provide. Estate planning attorneys are more than just document drafters. They are advisers. With your attorney, you should be running through the different scenarios that may occur at the time of your death and making sure that you are satisfied with the outcome of each based on the plan you decide to create. 

The estate planning attorney can flag for you other issues that may be of concern. Depending on your age, income and assets, it may be prudent to discuss long-term care insurance or asset protection planning for Medicaid purposes. You can discuss whether or not your beneficiaries will need a trust for any reason, including creditor protection, protection of government benefits or protection from themselves if they overspend and undersave. 

After you have discussed your assets and goals with the attorney, they can recommend options for you. Often, there is more than one option available. A description of the pros and cons of each plan and the cost to you should help you determine what is best in your circumstance. This is the point at which the documents can be created in draft form. If you are satisfied with the documents as written, they will then be signed with the attorney. Each document will have its own signing requirements for validity that will include the presence of witnesses and/or a notary public.  

If you have never created an estate plan or have not reviewed it in the last five years, you should reach out to an attorney to start the process.  

Nancy Burner, Esq. practices elder law and estate planning from her East Setauket office.