Photography

‘AND THEN MY HEART WITH PLEASURE FILLS, AND DANCES WITH THE DAFFODILS’ – William Wordsworth 

Gerard Romano of Port Jefferson Station spotted these daffodils during a drive through the Village of Port Jefferson on April 30 and stopped to snap a photo. He writes, ‘I was delighted to see these beautiful flowers growing in the west retaining wall along Village Beach Road. The sun was behind them and they literally glowed in the afternoon sun.’

HOME AT LAST

Mary Mayrick of Kings Park snapped this action shot of an osprey returning to its nest at Nissequogue River State Park on April 17. She writes, ‘The  osprey nest is over the area that changes from river to Long Island Sound water with the tide. It is an amazing place to view many of their habits from a safe distance without disturbing them.’

Send your Photo of the Week to leisure@tbrnewspapers.com.

WHAT A RIDE! 

Elisa Hendrey of Mount Sinai visited the Heritage Park’s annual Fling into Spring Carnival last Sunday and captured this stunning image. She writes, ‘[It seems as if] the ride, called Pharaoh’s Fury, is sailing up into the deep blue sky. A huge crowd turned out to enjoy the event and the warm weather.’

Send your Photo of the Week to leisure@tbrnewspapers.com.

SOME SPRINGTIME GREEN

Joe Kelly (www.joekayaker.com) captured this photo of a great egret in breeding colors and plumage at Frank Melville Memorial Park in Setauket on April 18. He writes, ‘You really can’t see much of the plumage in this shot but just look at the green in its face. Even the Hulk would be impressed with that color! Frank Melville Park is a good place to catch these guys in action. Come down to the park and take a stroll. It’s a beautiful place.’

Send your Photo of the Week to leisure@tbrnewspapers.com.

SPRING BLUES

Elyse Sutton of Farmingville took this photo outside the Country House Restaurant in Stony Brook last Sunday. She writes, ‘The magnolia tree and daffodils are blooming but it still doesn’t quite feel like spring.’

Send your Photo of the Week to leisure@tbrnewspapers.com.

HOPE ‘SPRINGS’ ETERNAL

Alyssa Cutler took this photo of a forsythia branch in Port Jefferson on April 2. She writes,  ‘[This was taken] right after the snow stopped on April 2. This is what Long Islanders are about. Strong backs to weather storms, eternally hopeful and rejoicing in the beauty around us. Also, we smile a lot more in the spring and summer!’

Send your Photo of the Week to leisure@tbrnewspapers.com.

SEAWORTHY SKIFFS

Gerard Romano of Port Jefferson Station took this photo on March 25 using a Nikon D3300 with a Nikon 18-200mm lens. He writes, ‘I took a walk down by the Brookhaven boat ramp at Port Jefferson Harbor. The little skiffs pictured have been readied to be sailed by the young students of Stony Brook School this spring. For this photo I propped up a nearby life preserver and framed the picture.’

Send your Photo of the Week to leisure@tbrnewspapers.com.

GREAT HOOT

Anthony Frasca of Old Field recently snapped this photo of a well-camouflauged great horned owl, one of a nesting pair, in his backyard using a Nikon D40 with a Nikon telephoto lens. He writes, ‘The owls have a nest in a pine tree in my backyard and I frequently see one or the other flying off at dusk to hunt.’

Send your Photo of the Week to leisure@tbrnewspapers.com.

Above, ‘Corinth Sheep’ by James Napoli, last year’s Best in Show Winner. Photo courtesy of Gurwin Jewish

Gurwin Jewish Nursing & Rehabilitation Center in Commack invites all amateur photographers, including students, to submit entries for its 25th Annual Photo Contest sponsored by The Tiffen Company of Hauppauge.

Winners of the unique contest have the distinct honor of not only receiving recognition for their work, but the privilege of helping to enhance the lives of the 460 residents that call Gurwin “home,” as winning photographs are permanently displayed in the Center’s renowned Tiffin Gallery and throughout the facility for the enjoyment of residents, staff and visitors.

Nearly 1000 submissions are received each year from across the globe and are judged by a panel of professional photographers who choose the winners based on clarity, composition, subject matter and suitability for display at the Center. Grand prize and honorable mentions, as well as Best-In-Show and Runner-Up winners are selected in each of 12 categories: Landscapes, Travel, People, Pets, Children, Wildlife, Nature, Still Life, Altered/Enhanced, Student, Long Island/New York and Action/Sports. In addition, a panel of Gurwin residents weighs in on their favorites, choosing “Resident Selection” winners from among the entries.

“Our annual Photo Contest is a unique opportunity for our schools, local camera clubs and other members of the community to touch the lives of our residents,” said Stuart B. Almer, Gurwin’s President and CEO. “Their beautiful photos add a feeling of vibrancy to the facility; both residents and staff are eagerly awaiting this year’s crop of winners.”

Every submission is a “winner” in the sense that those not selected for a prize are repurposed by Gurwin’s staff for programs that benefit the residents. Prints are used as reminiscence aids, for visual stimulation and for art therapy, providing a source of comfort and inspiration, specifically for those residents in the Center’s Memory Care Unit and Adult Day Care Programs.

Winners are selected and notified in May. A reception at the Gurwin Center for winning photographers will be held in June where they will receive their cash prize, award certificate and/or crystal trophy. Deadline for submissions is April 16.

Photographers may submit up to seven printed color or black and white 8×10 or 8×12 photographs for a fee of $5 per entry. Entry forms are available for download online at www.gurwin.org/about/photo-contest or by calling the Gurwin Public Relations office at 631-715-2568.

HARBINGERS OF SPRING Ann Moran of Sound Beach recently discovered these snowdrops popping up in her front yard. She writes, ‘Some of my plants in the yard are telling me that spring is not far away. I’ll believe it when I see it!‘

Fun fact: Snowdrops were named after earrings not drops of snow. In the 15th, 16th and 17th centuries women often wore dangly, white drop-shaped earrings known as ‘eardrops.’ Some other common names of snowdrops are Candlemas bells, white ladies, Little Sister of the Snows, snow piercers, dingle-dangle and flower of hope.

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