Events

The rain this past weekend didn’t stop a certain rabbit from dropping off goodies at Benner’s Farm for Three Village and neighboring children.

The farm hosted egg hunt events April 20 and 21, where children found plastic eggs filled with treats and stuffed animals.

Families also were able to visit with the farm’s baby animals, check out crafts from vendors, play on the big swing, walk the trails and take pictures with the Easter Bunny!

St. James R. C. Church in Setauket also hosted its egg hunt April 21 after Easter Sunday morning service.

The Easter Bunny will visit Benner’s Farm in East Setauket on April 20 and 21 from noon to 4 p.m. File photo by Rita J. Egan

Bunny Fest at Eagle’s Nest

The Easter Bunny and his friend Li’l Chick invite children of all ages to join them in the Vanderbilt Rose Garden at the Suffolk County Vanderbilt Museum, 180 Little Neck Road, Centerport for an egg hunt, petting zoo, bubble machine and light fare (coffee, juice, goodies) on April 20. Three times are available: 9 a.m. (for toddlers); and 10 or 11 a.m. Both times include a planetarium show. Children are encouraged to bring their Easter baskets and bonnets. Tickets are $25 adults, $20 children. Preregistration is required at www.vanderbiltmuseum.org. For more information, please call 631-854-5579.

Easter Egg Hunt and Breakfast

Caroline Church of Brookhaven, 1 Dyke Road, Setauket will host an Easter Egg Hunt and Breakfast with the Easter Bunny on April 20 from 9:30 to 11:30 a.m. Over 1,000 eggs to find, photos with the Easter Bunny, rabbits to pet, best homemade Easter hat contest and more. Don’t forget your camera! Free. Call Elaine at 631-428-0475.

Breakfast with the Easter Bunny

Knights of Columbus Father Seyfried Council 821 will host a Breakfast with the Easter Bunny with fun activities and games on April 20 at St. Joseph’s Travis Hall, 59 Church St., Kings Park from 10:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Tickets are $6 for adults and children age 3 and older. Call Jim at 631-656-8991 to order. 

Spring Egg Hunt at the Hatchery

Cold Spring Harbor Fish Hatchery, 1660 Route 25A, Cold Spring Harbor will hold its annual Spring Egg Hunt on April 20 from 10:30 a.m. to noon for children up to age 6. Last admission at 10:30 a.m. Bring a basket. Admission is $6 adults, $4 children ages 3 to 12 and seniors, under age 3 free. Call 516-692-6768.

Spring Fair and Egg Hunt

Sweetbriar Nature Center, 62 Eckernkamp Drive, Smithtown will host a Spring Fair and Egg Hunt on April 20 from noon to 4 p.m. Enjoy games, live animal presentations, crafts, face painting, egg hunts, food and refreshments. A special long-eared guest will be available for photo opportunities. Easter plants will be available for purchase. Admission is $15 per child, $5 adults. Call 631-979-6344.

Easter weekend at Benner’s Farm

Benner’s Farm, 56 Gnarled Hollow Road, East Setauket will host its annual Easter Egg Hunts on April 20 and 21 from noon to 4 p.m. Hunts are held at 12:30, 2 and 3:30 p.m. Bring your own basket. While you’re waiting, visit and hold the baby animals, take pictures with the Holiday Bunny, visit the farm store and check out the craft vendors. Admission is $8 adults, $6 children and seniors. Call 631-689-8172.

Easter Bunny visits Northport

The Easter Bunny will be visiting children in downtown Northport on Saturday, April 20 bearing treats from 1 to 4 p.m., courtesy of the Northport Chamber of Commerce. Great opportunity for photos. Free. Call 631-754-3905 for more info.

Easter Parade and Egg Hunt

Join the Greater Port Jefferson Chamber of Commerce for its annual Easter Parade and Egg Hunt on April 21 from noon to 1:30 p.m. The parade kicks off in front of Theatre Three on Main Street and finishes at the Port Jefferson Village Center on East Broadway. An egg hunt for ages 2 to 8 will be held on the Great Lawn at Harborfront Park at 12:30 p.m. No rain date. Call 631-473-1414.

Easter Egg Hunt

The Village of Northport will hold its annual Easter Egg Hunt on April 21 at Northport Village Park at 1 p.m. Rain date is April 28. Sponsored by the Northport/Centerport Lions Club. Call 516-380-6444 for additional details.

Sachem Public Library, 150 Holbrook Road, Holbrook will host a Suffolk County One-Stop Employment Center Job Fair on Wednesday, April 17 from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m.

Representatives from AFLAC, Allstate, Amneal Pharmaceuticals, Arrow Security, CIRCOR, DiCarlo Food Service, East End Disabilities, East/West Industries, Express Employment Professionals, Family First Home Companions, HEAP, Home Care Solutions, Home Depot, Home Instead Senior Care, HW Staffing, Integrity Home Care, Jefferson’s Ferry, LI State Veterans Home, Liberty Moving & Storage, Life’s WORC, Luitpold Pharmaceuticals, Marcum Search, NY Life Insurance, NYS Troopers, Options for Community Living, Precious Lambs Childcare, Rockwell Collins, SCOPE, SCWA, Splish Splash, Suffolk County Civil Service, Supreme Screw Products, SYSCO, Titan Global, Triangle Building Products, Walmart, Well Life Network and Windowrama are scheduled to attend.

All are welcome and no registration is required. Bring copies of your resume and dress to impress! Call 631-588-5024.

Belle (Emma Watson) comes to realize that underneath the hideous exterior of the Beast (Dan Stevens) there is the kind heart of a Prince in Disney's BEAUTY AND THE BEAST, a live-action adaptation of the studio's animated classic directed by Bill Condon. © 2016 Disney Enterprises inc. All Rights Reserved.

Stony Brook University’s Staller Center for the Arts, 100 Nicolls Road, Stony Brook will host a concert by the Stony Brook Wind Ensemble on the Main Stage on Wednesday, April 17 at 7:30 p.m.

Conducted by Bruce Engel, the program will include Samuel Barber’s “Overture to the School for Scandal,” Franz Schubert’s “Unfinished Symphony (1st movement),” “Bolero by Maurice Ravel, “An American in Paris” by George Gershwin, “Beauty and the Beast” by Allan Menken and “Pines of the Appian Way” by Ottorino Respighi/

Tickets are $10 adults, $5 students and seniors. For more information, call 631-632-2787 or visit www.stallercenter.com.

Stan Brodsky in his studio. Photo by Peter Scheer

By Melissa Arnold

For Stan Brodsky, painting was so much more than just a skill or even a career. It was a language, a love affair, a truly sensual experience. The artist shared those feelings openly with students over the course of a renowned teaching career that spanned more than 50 years. 

Several months ago, the Art League of Long Island in Dix Hills began to prepare Stan Brodsky and Friends, a springtime exhibit celebrating Brodsky’s work along with nearly 30 of his dearest friends, many of whom were former students and mentees.

‘Woman in a Car,’ oil/acrylic on canvas by Doug Reina

On March 30, just two weeks before the exhibit’s scheduled opening, Stan Brodsky passed away at the age of 94. He had continued to work and teach until the final weeks of his life, just as he wanted it. Brodsky’s students noted that the World War II veteran tried to retire a few years ago, but he couldn’t stand being away from doing what he loved. 

The Art League is moving forward with the show as planned, with the exhibit running from April 13 to 28. A reception on April 14 at 3:30 p.m. will allow the artists and those who loved Brodsky to honor his life and legacy.

Participating artists include Ennid Berger, Susan Bird, Susan Canin, Denise DiGiovanna, Simon Fenster, Stuart Friedman, Peter Galasso, Lenore Ann Hanson, Ginger Balizer-Hendler, Caroline Isacsson, Vincent Joseph, Deborah Katz, Marceil Kazickas, Denise Kramer, Barbara Miller, Catherine Morris, Pamela Long Nolan, Dianne Parker, Alicia R. Peterson, Doug Reina, Fran Roberts, Susan M. Rostan, Ellen Hallie Schiff, Laura Powers-Swiggett, Janice Sztabnik, Lois Walker and Hiroko Yoshida.

Stan has touched so many lives, inspiring them to pursue their passions,” said Susan Peragallo, coordinator and curator of the Art League’s Jeanie Tengelsen Gallery. “The exhibit will be a chance for everyone to celebrate him — the 27 artists in the show are only a small segment of those who were influenced by him over the years.”

A master abstract expressionist, Brodsky studied photojournalism and fine art before receiving a doctorate in art education from Columbia University in 1959. Originally from Greenwich Village, he moved to Huntington in 1965. Most of his teaching years were spent at Long Island University’s C.W. Post Campus in Brookville, and a collection of his notes and sketches from 1951 to 2004 can be found at the Smithsonian Institution.

‘Superficial Information,’ oil on canvas by Marceil Kazickas

Brodsky’s relationship with the Art League began in the late ’90s when he became an instructor. The classes were small in the beginning, with just five students enrolled in 1994, but grew rapidly, and eventually people had to be turned away from lack of space. “It’s not so much that he was popular, but he was inspiring and generous in his critiques, and people really responded to that,” Peragallo said.

Peter Galasso of Setauket remembers that Brodsky could often be found in the same way over the years as students arrived for class — sitting at his desk, usually eating an egg sandwich, always poring over an art history text.

“He had a contagious passion, and was constantly reading and continuing to study,” said Galasso, who began studies under Brodsky 20 years ago, eventually becoming a friend and traveling companion. “He was always looking to travel somewhere new or different. He wanted to be inspired by the local color of a place.”

Susan Rostan of Woodbury remembers entering Brodsky’s classroom for the first time while pursuing a master’s in fine art. Brodsky arranged the students in a circle and asked each one to introduce themselves. When it was her turn, Rostan simply told him, “I’ve heard I’m either going to love you or hate you, but I’m cautiously optimistic.”

‘She Wears Her Heart on Her Sleeve …,’ mixed media by Susan Canin

Many years later, Rostan was sitting in a different class of Brodsky’s, this one at the Art League. But she was stunned by the striking realization that nothing had changed: He still wore the same striped sweaters and paint-splattered jeans. She painted a full-length portrait of him that day that will appear in the exhibit.

“He taught us as much about ourselves as he did about painting,” said Rostan, who is now working on a biography of Brodsky. “He was an unusual teacher in that he approached his students as equals and opened himself up to be vulnerable and form friendships with them, which allowed him to encourage them particularly well.”

Brodsky’s friendship and deep encouragement were beloved by so many of his students, said Doug Reina of Setauket. In fact, some of them continued to take his classes for decades just to spend more time with him.

“Stan had this ability to make you feel special. He was genuinely curious about you, and that means a lot,” Reina said. “In the old days before taking his classes, I would look at a scene and just try to copy it. But through him I learned to paint in a way that also expresses how I feel about the subject and the sensuousness of the paint itself. Stan painted with his own language and created something truly unique for the world.”

Stan Brodsky and Friends will be on view at the Art League of Long Island’s Jeanie Tengelsen Gallery, 107 E. Deer Park Road, Dix Hills. Admission is free. For more information, call 631-462-5400 or visit www.artleagueli.net

Stony Brook Grist Mill

The Stony Brook Grist Mill, circa 1751, 100 Harbor Road, Stony Brook opens for the season on Saturday, April 13 and will be open weekends from noon to 4:30 p.m. through Oct. 31.

Long Island’s most completely equipped working mill, it is listed on the National and New York State Register of Historic Places. Visit the Country Store and watch the only female miller in the U.S. grind grain into flour just as it was done during the Revolutionary War.

Admission is $2 adults, $1 children 12 and under. For additional info, call 631-751-2244.

The Selden Fire Department remembered the life of a fallen hero by dedicating a new memorial park April 6.

Fifty years ago, Chief Arnold Seaman was killed in the line of duty while responding to a fire at Newfield High School. On the way to the high school April 10, 1969, Seaman was involved in a car crash. He was taken to the hospital but did not survive his injuries.

The park named in his honor was built on the corner of Hawkins Avenue and North Bicycle Path near the site of the fatal crash. Friends and family paid tribute to the late Seaman, hailed as a true American hero.

Jack Emr was the assistant fire chief of the department at the time of the crash and took over as chief after Seaman’s death. He said burying his close friend took a big chunk of his heart.

“Every April 10, I have a beer and I say, ‘Chief, save me a seat for me on the fire truck, I’ll be there soon,’” he said.

In the center of the park is a memorial honoring the late chief with a bronze helmet, an exact replica of the one he wore 50 years ago. The area around the park was designated as Chief Arnold Seaman Way.

Jim Seaman, Arnold’s son, thanked the crowd for coming to the dedication and said since the day of the crash 50 years ago, the Selden Fire Department has had the family’s back. “It is a debt we can never repay, and I thank them,” he said.

Jim Seaman reminisced about being named an honorary fireman back in 1969, displaying to the crowd the badge he was given all those years ago. He also mentioned an experience about ten years ago, when at an installation dinner he was called up and handed a fire chief’s jacket, calling it the greatest honor of his life.

“I know my father is looking down and is beaming ear to ear right now,” he said.

Later in his speech he added, “This [park] is something as a family we can be proud of. It’s something 10 years from now my father’s great-grandchildren can come and visit.”

BJ Intini and Lois Reboli of the Reboli Center accept the Community Recognition Award with presenter Beverly C. Tyler

CELEBRATING THE THREE VILLAGE COMMUNITY

The Three Village Historical Society held its 42nd annual Awards Celebration at the Three Village Inn in Stony Brook on March 27. The evening recognized volunteers, local businesses, society members and area residents who have made significant contributions to help preserve the shared heritage within the Three Village area. Honored guests included the Setauket Harbor Task Force, Michael Tessler, Leah S. Dunaief, Patricia Yantz, Morton Rosen, Steven G. Fontana, the Reboli Center for Art and History, Maura and Matthew Dunn of The Holly Tree House, Marcia Seaman and the Prestia family of Bagel Express. Legislator Kara Hahn and Councilwoman Valerie Cartright also attended to honor the winners.

All photos by Beverly C. Tyler

From left, curator Jud Newborn, Pantheon Books publicist Kathryn Zuckerman, author Victoria Riskin, and Cinema Arts Centre Director Dylan Skolnick Photo by Ryan T. Perry/CAC

Author Victoria Riskin, daughter of Hollywood film icon Fay Wray and legendary screenwriter Robert Riskin, signed copies of her latest book, “Fay Wray and Robert Riskin: A Hollywood Memoir” at the Cinema Arts Centre in Huntington on Monday. The book signing was held at a reception following a screening of the original 1933 “King Kong.” The event was curated and produced by Jud Newborn.

Estella Kennedy and Maddie Quigley are double cast as Ladahlord. Photo from Karen Van Houten

Simple Gifts Productions is proud to present “James and the Giant Peach” on April 11 and 12 at 7:30 p.m. and April 13 at 5 p.m. and 7:30 p.m. at Finley Middle School, 20 Greenlawn Road, Huntington. Based on the Roald Dahl children’s book, and with a great score by one of Broadway’s best duos, Pasek & Paul, this musical is a great event for the whole family. Tickets are $18 adults and $15 children (10 or younger). To reserve tickets, call 561-9522 or visit www.simplegiftsproductions.com.

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