Events

Gillian Winters

The Long Island Apple Festival returned to the Sherwood-Jayne Farm in East Setauket for its 30th year on Sept. 29. Presented by the Society for the Preservation of Long Island Antiquities and Homestead Arts, the fun event attracted over 2,000 visitors this year in celebration of the humble apple. 

Rosolino Gould
Susan Folan (left) and Katie Specht

One of the highlights of the day was the apple pie contest which was judged by Port Jefferson Village Mayor Margot Garant; Lisa Basini, founder of The Baking Coach Inc.; Chef Marc Anthony Bynum, restaurateur and owner of MB Concepts; Adam Devine, manager of Three Village Inn’s Mirabelle Restaurant & Tavern; Bernice Fehringer from Chocolate Works in Stony Brook; Chef Phil Morizio, chef and owner of Café Al Dente in Oyster Bay; Nick Acampora, president of Port Jefferson Historical Society; New York State Assemblyman Steve Englebright;  Town of Brookhaven Councilwoman Valerie Cartright; and Town of Brookhaven historian Barbara Russell. 

First place for Best Tasting Pie went to Gillian Winters of E. Setauket; Alice Glass of Setauket won second place; and Rosolino Gould of Kings Park captured third place. The Most Beautiful Pie award went to Susan Folan and Katie Specht of Setauket. Congratulations to all!

First ‘Market Day’ Fair the Old Field Clubhouse, Sept. 1929. Photo courtesy of Three Village Garden Club

By Arlene Oliver

When the Three Village Garden Club decided they wanted to present a history of the club for their 90th Anniversary Celebration, they started a scavenger hunt that unearthed priceless treasures. The members searched their attics and basements and turned to older friends and members. They found original minutes from the start of the club, as well as ancient photographs and newspaper articles from the 1920s,1930s, and beyond.

These sources told the story of a group of women who had just gotten the right to vote in 1920, and were now ready to take the bit in their teeth and tackle the problems they confronted in their community.

They were a diverse group of women. Some were used to wealth and privilege and social status. But many were ordinary village women, who cajoled their husbands into plowing up a vegetable plots and replacing them with flower gardens. They all took great pride in using their voices to tackle the issues of the day.

Some of these issues involved community beautification, such as planting flowers and trees in public spaces and removing unsightly billboards that proliferated on roads in an early advertising fever.

But they were also concerned with the plight of  the unemployed  during the  Depression, the  institution of garbage  removal and making safe public water available to  the community.  During World War 11, they engaged in War Relief efforts, grew Victory Gardens and manned the Lighthouse to watch for German planes.

After the war, the club focused on spreading the love and knowledge of gardening. They worked on wildlife conservation, environmental issues, and supporting students interested in these areas through scholarships to college and environmental camps.

As the years rolled on, the TVGC partnered with many other non-profit groups such as the Guide Dog Foundation, the Veterans Home, and Kings Park Hospital. Through their World Gardening Program, they supported indigenous people in the Amazon and helped provide safe drinking water through organizations in Africa and the U.S.

Through its membership in the Federated Garden Clubs of New York State, the TVGC is part of a larger community of dedicated gardeners in New York State. FGCNYS is very effective in promoting knowledge of gardening, horticulture and environmental awareness. The Three Village Garden Club is proud to have been cited by this parent group for its outstanding work toward these goals.

In 2019, our club is still made up of enthusiastic and hardworking members who are engaged in changing the world for the better, while quietly cultivating their own  gardens.

The spirit of the roaring twenties will come alive on Sunday, Oct. 20 when The Three Village Garden Club invites the community to its 90th anniversary celebration, “Welcome to 1929,” at The Bates House, 1 Bates Road, Setauket from 3 to 6 p.m. Guests will enjoy entertainment by musicians from Ward Melville High School; The Algorhythms, a barbershop quartet; and a dance demonstration by Arthur Murray Dance Centers.

Highlights from the club’s 90-year history will be enlarged on panels that will parallel global events and Elegant Eating will cater a  wide variety of  delicious gourmet food and dessert served with wine and non-alcoholic beverages. A roaring twenties theme will be highlighted by details in the decorations and guests are encouraged to dress in 1920s attire.

The cost of the event is $50 per person and reservations and payment must be made in advance by calling  631-751-2743 or 631-689-7186.

Arlene Oliver is a history enthusiast and member of the Three Village Garden Club.

Photo courtesy of St. Catherine of Sienna

“Life is like a disco, no matter how the music changes, you just keep on dancing.” The charmed quote is taken from the 2011 movie, Jumping the Broom, and captured the essence of St. Catherine of Siena Hospital’s 8th Annual Pink Ribbon Salute, held on Oct. 2. Each year, the breast cancer survivor event adopts a creative theme to add a layer of fun to the celebration.

This year, the event took on a disco theme — and more than 100 breast cancer survivors showed up in their best Saturday Night Fever attire ready to dance the night away as they triumph, despite the changes cancer may have brought upon their lives. 

“It was wonderful to see familiar and new faces in our growing family of courageous women celebrating their fearless determination to overcome,” said St. Catherine’s Administrative Director of Reconstructive Microsurgery Dr. Diana Yoon-Schwartz.

The event was moderated by St. Catherine’s breast health navigator Meiling Alsen, and a special welcome was given by chief nursing officer Mary Jane Finnegan. 

“When I look at all of you, I know I am surrounded by strong, courageous women, along with your family members and friends, who have survived or are in the process of surviving a fight that no one should ever have to fight — you truly are my inspiration,” said Finnegan. 

The welcome was followed by the latest updates in breast care by St. Catherine’s Medical Director of Breast Health Services Dr. Jana Deitch, who also took the opportunity to address survivors directly. “Tonight is a wonderful night about celebrating women who fight the tough fight every day — you are not only surviving, but thriving and giving back to other women who may need some encouragement on the journey to healing,” said Deitch.

The disco mood was further set with live renditions of the era’s top hits, played by Just Cause Band. The band, originated by attorneys, has grown into a diversified group, born from the love of music and a desire to help the community by supporting charity events at no cost. Thanks to the philanthropic and harmonizing skills of Just Cause Band, survivors and supporters danced and sang all night, and when the rendition of Gloria Gaynor’s “I Will Survive” was played, the room erupted in unified triumph. 

“It is a moment I will always remember — it was electrifying and inspiring,” said Deitch.

The Pink Ribbon has become a tradition that survivors and staff look forward to annually. “Our survivors and staff dance the night away in celebration — it is an evening we all cherish, filled with laughter and hope, share with family and friends,” said St. Catherine’s Medical Director of Breast Imaging Dr. Anne Green. 

“I’m proud to be a part of an exceptional group of compassionate breast health specialists who service patients from one location in their own community — we are a community that provides the true continuum of care for our patients — so, we will keep on dancing right beside them!”

The Pink Ribbon Salute is supported by St. Catherine of Siena’s senior leadership, and the event was co-sponsored with the support of Suffolk Anesthesia Associates, Genomic Health Inc. Myriad Genetics, New York Cancer Specialists, New Street Plastic Surgery and Square Care.

On Oct. 13, The Ward Melville Heritage Organization celebrated Hispanic Heritage Month, which runs from Sept. 15 to Oct. 15, at its Educational & Cultural Center with performances from Sol y Sombra Spanish Dance Company.

Attendees, including students from The Stony Brook School, were treated to an array of dances including flamenco, salsa, the Argentine tango, Mexican folk and more. Maria Loreta, founder and artistic director of Sol y Sombra, provided a brief history of the origins of the dances before each performance. After the presentation, audience members got up to try a few steps of salsa, and then sampled empanadas, churros and rice and beans.

Stephanie Carsten portrays Maria Smith Williamson at last year’s event. Photo courtesy of TVHS

By Melissa Arnold

Ah, October. The perfect time of year to grab a light jacket, sip a hot drink, and go for a casual walk through a cemetery.

For a quarter of a century, the Three Village Historical Society has invited visitors from far and wide to explore the lives of some of our area’s greatest contributors, both famous and little known at its annual Spirits Tour.

The interesting twist is that the event brings guests on a walking tour through two of Setauket’s historic cemeteries — Caroline Church of Brookhaven Cemetery and the Setauket Presbyterian Church Cemetery — to meet each deceased community member and hear his or her story firsthand.

It’s a unique, fascinating and engaging way to learn more about the area’s rich history, and none of it is scary or Halloween-themed. They promise.

The long-running event, held this year on Oct. 19, is primarily the work of historical society board member Frank Turano who creates detailed scripts for each character and has written more than 400 pages over the past 25 years.

The historical society works hard to ensure that the tour is different each year, with some familiar faces as well as new people to meet. This year’s theme, The Unforgotten, focuses on names you might not know from history class but who still made a significant impact on the area.

“There were a number of people I knew about that never got any sort of notoriety,” said Turano. “So I decided to go about the process of finding interesting but obscure characters. It took several months to write the scripts.”

Volunteers from around the community, many of whom are involved with local theater productions, suit up for the evening in period attire from Nan’s Antique Costume & Props Rental in Port Jefferson for a true-to-life experience.

The cast

Greeter

(Tim Adams)

Richard Floyd 

(Michael Freed)

Anna Kopriva 

(Karen Overin)

Myra Lyons 

(Stephanie Carsten)

Edward Pheiffer 

(Tommy Ranieri)

Justice Carl Rhuland (Steve Healy)

John Scott 

(Mort Rosen)

Gen. Francis Spinola (George Overin)

Caroline Strong 

(Karin Lynch)

Hilma Wilson 

(Tara Ebrahimian)

Sarah Young 

(Theresa Travers)

Henrietta Shipman

(Cathleen Shannon)

“I live in the area, and it feels great to be connected to the place where I live,” said Janet McCauley, a board member of the historical society who’s also served as co-chair for the tour for more than 10 years. “It’s so much fun watching the actors portray these different figures in our history, and to see people from the community come back year after year.”

The 90-minute guided tour will include a dozen historical figures, among them Brookhaven town founder Richard Floyd, World War I nurse Caroline Strong, and Sarah Young, a woman with a curious story and shocking devotion to the man she loved. For the first time ever, this year’s tour features more women than men, a difficult feat considering the majority of historical records were written about and by men, Turano said. 

Even Three Village Historical Society President Steve Healy is getting in on the action with a portrayal of Justice Carl Rhuland, a local businessman and justice of the peace.

“The Spirits Tour is one of the longest-running events of its kind and it’s close to my heart,” Healy said. “You can go on this tour every year and learn something new. Everyone is so passionate about bringing these stories to life, from the costumes to casting to script writing and the fine details. Frank has incredible attention to detail and this time of year provides the perfect atmosphere for the tour.”

McCauley urges all tour goers to arrive early, dress for extended time outdoors and to wear comfortable walking shoes. And of course, help yourself to apple cider and donuts donated from local supermarkets and Ann Marie’s Farmstand in Setauket. An exhibit with additional information will be on display at Setauket Presbyterian Church throughout the night.

The 25th Annual Spirits Tour will be held on Saturday, Oct. 19 (rain date Oct. 26). Tours, which are approximately 90 minutes long, leave from the Setauket Presbyterian Church, 5 Caroline Ave., Setauket every 15 minutes starting at 5 p.m. Each tour lasts approximately 1½ to 2 hours. The last tour departs at 7:45 p.m. 

Tickets in advance at www.tvhs.org are $25 adults, $15 members; $10 children under 12, $8 members. Tickets on the night of the event, if available, are $30 adults, $20 members; $12 children under 12, $10 members. For more information, call 631-751-3730. 

Middle Country Public Library in Centereach hosted the 19th annual Women’s EXPO on Oct. 3. Thousands came out to kick off their holiday shopping at the one-day event presented by the Middle Country Library Foundation and the library’s Miller Business Center.

More than 80 women entrepreneurs were given the opportunity to introduce their products, which included jewelry, children’s books, soaps, candles, chocolate, fall crafts, clothing and much more. Fifth Season restaurant offered lunch in the EXPO Café. 

This year’s lead sponsor was Bank of America. The event was also sponsored by Campolo, Middleton & McCormick, LLP of Ronkonkoma; People’s Alliance Federal Credit Union; BankUnited; TD Bank; Jefferson’s Ferry; and the Greater Middle Country Chamber of Commerce. Vendors interested in participating in next year’s event are encouraged to visit www.womensExpoli.org. See more photos of the event at www.tbrnewsmedia.com.

Photos by Heidi Sutton

The slight chill in the air Oct. 5 created the perfect feel for Bethel Hobbs Community Farm’s annual fall festival.

Hundreds joined the fun at the farm where there were bounce houses, pumpkins, music, tractor rides, face painting, vendors and more.

Country Line Dancing featuring Skip from Country Rhythms Long Island was on hand to provide line dancing lessons throughout the day.

Christian Taylor

In honor of the 75th anniversary of D-Day, June 6, 1944, the Stony Brook School, 1 Chapman Parkway, Stony Brook will host a screening of ​“The Girl Who Wore Freedom” ​on Sunday, Oct. 6 at 1:30 p.m. The documentary, written and directed by Stony Brook School alumna Christian Taylor, showcases the unconventional love story between the people of France and the American GIs who freed them from German occupation.

“[The film] features Danielle Patrix, who was just 1 year old when German tanks rolled into the village of Sainte Marie du Mont, France. Through her eyes, we experience the hardships and trauma of the four-year occupation, as well as the overwhelming joy felt when American GIs freed her city. Seventy years later, the people of Normandy still hold an annual celebration to remember and honor the sacrifices that American soldiers made to free them. This documentary keeps Dany’s story, as well as stories of her fellow French citizens, alive,” explained Taylor.

Admission is free but reservations are requested and can be made at www.normandystories.com/screenings​. For further information, please call 631-751-1800.

By Beverly C. Tyler

Many Long Islanders had the opportunity this past Saturday, on a beautiful fall day, to enjoy the stories of four Revolutionary War era women set in four historic buildings in Stony Brook and Setauket that are owned by the Ward Melville Heritage Organization. Titled Courageous Women of the Revolutionary War, the theatrical event presented a charming glimpse into the lives of these women portrayed by costumed professional actors.

Those who attended one of the three scheduled two-hour tours met at the WMHO Educational & Cultural Center in Stony Brook, received a bag containing program and historical details, WHMO materials and a snack and were directed to board one of four trolleys.

Assigned Bus A for the 11 a.m. tour we were greeted by Nancy Dorney, an active member of the Daughter of the American Revolution who explained the program and answered questions. At each stop we were greeted by another guide who ushered us into the historic building.

Our first stop was the circa 1725 Hawkins-Mount house in Stony Brook. We sat in the parlor and were soon greeted by Ruth Mills Hawkins who told us how difficult it was to raise her children, assist her husband Jonas in running the general store from their home, help cover his activities as a spy for the Culper Spy Ring, and do all of this with British forces in control of Long Island, watching their every move.

Outside the Hawkins-Mount house, WHMO’s Gabrielle Lindau showed tourgoers photos of the paint samples tried out on the walls of the upstairs room where William Sidney Mount worked on many of his paintings.

Next was the circa 1665 Joseph Brewster house where we met his wife Rebecca Mills Brewster, a fiery Irish lass who helped her husband run their tavern and inn while being reviled and insulted by British authorities.

In the circa 1709 Thompson House, we met Phebe Satterly Thompson, wife of Dr. Samuel Thompson, who was quite ill and described her symptoms, her husband’s work as a doctor and how she was dealing with her disease at a time when many of her neighbors were also infected.

Our last stop was the circa 1751 Stony Brook Grist Mill where we enjoyed the byplay between Miles the miller and Katie, an indentured servant from Cork, Ireland, who was living rough after the home she lived in was taken over by British troops. Everyone on our trolley thoroughly enjoyed the pleasant, instructive and well-organized tour, and the weather was delightful.

All photos by Beverly C. Tyler

By Heidi Sutton

Christmas came early for many little girls and boys as two members of the Radio City Rockettes, Mindy Moeller (left) and Taylor Shimko, stopped by the Smithtown Library’s Main Branch on Sept. 25 to meet their fans and take part in a kids craft program.

Each child took an instant photo with the Rockettes that was placed in a keepsake snow globe. The globe was then decorated with stickers.

Smithtown Supervisor Ed Wehrheim presented the two dancers with a proclamation thanking them for their time and “the joyful memories made today with the children and families of Smithtown.”

The day was especially meaningful for the supervisor’s 6-year-old granddaughter Danica (in the pink ballet outfit) who loves to watch the Radio City Christmas Spectacular show and aspires to become a Rockette when she grows up.