Arts & Entertainment

Above, the repaired column is lowered onto its new base. Vanderbilt Museum photo

An ancient column from Carthage (modern-day Tunisia), toppled and broken during a fierce windstorm on Oct. 30, 2017, has been repaired and reinstalled at the Suffolk County Vanderbilt Museum.

The company that repaired the two-ton column reinstalled it recently on a new, reinforced-concrete base.

The stately, thousand-year-old column, one of six near the entrance to the Vanderbilt Estate, was damaged when the storm uprooted a massive tree next to it.

The falling tree knocked down the column, which hit the curving stone wall that overlooks the Vanderbilt Boathouse and Northport Bay. The impact broke off the carved top, or capital. Experts from the A. Ottavino Corp. used a crane to lift the column onto a large flat-bed truck and took it to their stoneworks in Ozone Park, Queens for repair.

Ottavino, a third-generation family business founded in 1913, has worked on significant projects that include the Statue of Liberty, the Korean War Veterans Memorial, the main branch of the New York Public Library, Columbia University Medical Center and Brooklyn Borough Hall.

Each column is 14 feet high, 59 inches in circumference and weighs 4,000 pounds. The Cipollino marble was quarried on the Greek island of Euboea. Sometime after William K. Vanderbilt II (1878-1944) began building Eagle’s Nest, his Centerport estate and the home of the Vanderbilt Museum, in 1912, he relocated the columns from his first Long Island home, Deepdale in Lake Success.

The Suffolk County Vanderbilt Museum is located at 180 Little Neck Road in Centerport. Winter hours for the museum, mansion and grounds are Tuesdays from noon to 4 p.m., Saturdays and Sundays from 11:15 a.m. to 4 p.m. and Monday, Jan. 20 from 11:15 a.m. to 4 p.m. For further information, call 631-854-5579 or visit www.vanderbiltmuseum.org.

Stock photo

By Linda Toga, Esq.

Linda Toga, Esq.

THE FACTS: My husband Joe and I own our house jointly. In addition to our joint checking account, Joe has a savings account with a balance of about $100,000. Joe suffers from advanced dementia and his health is failing. I do not know how much longer he will be able to live at home with me. I anticipate needing to apply for Medicaid down the road. I understand that Joe is more likely to be eligible for Medicaid if his assets are transferred to me. 

THE QUESTION: As his spouse, can I simply transfer Joe’s assets into my name?

THE ANSWER: Unfortunately, you do not have the authority to transfer Joe’s assets to yourself unless Joe has a power of attorney in which he names you as his agent and gives you authority to make gifts to yourself. Without the benefit of a power of attorney that includes a statutory gifts rider, you have no more authority to transfer Joe’s assets to yourself than a stranger would have.

Even though you and Joe own your home jointly, both you and Joe would need to sign a deed to transfer the property to you alone. If Joe’s dementia is advanced, there is a chance that he lacks the capacity to sign a deed. To find out if that is the case, you and Joe should talk to an experienced estate planning attorney. After speaking to Joe, the attorney should be able to tell you whether Joe has the requisite capacity to sign a deed. 

If the determination is that Joe lacks capacity, the only other option you have to transfer the property is to be appointed as Joe’s guardian in the context of a costly and time-consuming guardianship proceeding. 

Just as Joe’s interest in your house cannot be transferred to you without Joe taking action, the funds in his savings account cannot be removed without Joe’s active participation. Unless you are Joe’s agent pursuant to a valid, enforceable power of attorney or his legal guardian, Joe’s signature will be needed to close the account.

Fortunately, that is not the case when it comes to your joint account. You need not be Joe’s agent or his guardian to transfer the funds in the joint bank account to yourself. That is because joint account holders each have an ownership interest in the funds in a joint account. As such, any joint owner can either close that account or reduce the balance in the account to a negligible amount. If you close that account and put the funds in your name, the transfer will not be deemed a gift and the funds will be deemed not available to Joe in the context of his Medicaid application. 

Even if it is too late for Joe to sign a power of attorney giving you authority to handle his affairs and make gifts to yourself, it is not too late for you to delegate authority to an agent of your choice to handle your affairs down the road. To ensure that any power of attorney you sign is tailored to your needs, I urge you to retain an attorney who practices in the area of estate planning to explain in detail the current power of attorney and the various types of transaction and activities you may want to delegate, and to prepare for you a new power of attorney that reflects your wishes. 

Linda M. Toga, Esq. provides legal services in the areas of estate planning and administration, real estate, small business services and litigation from her East Setauket office. Visit her website at www.lmtogalaw.com or call 631-444-5605 to schedule a free consultation.

 

 

 

 

Teens from The Chai Center’s CTeen chapter in Dix Hills (CTEEN West Suffolk County) spent the holiday season giving back by collecting toys and wrapping them to be donated to children facing serious medical issues through the organization Chai Lifeline.

 CTeen, the fastest growing Jewish teen network in the world, inspires and facilitates teens who want to give back to their community and environment. Chai Lifeline is a preeminent international health support network for seriously ill children, their families, and communities

Photos from The Chai Center

 

From left, Emma Watson, Florence Pugh, Saoirse Ronan and Eliza Scanlen star as the March sisters in the latest adaptation of Little Women. Photo courtesy of SONY Pictures

By Jeffrey Sanzel

Louisa May Alcott’s semi-autobiographical novel Little Women was published in two volumes between 1868 and 1869. It told of the four March daughters: pretty Meg, tomboy Jo, delicate Beth and willful Amy. The book follows them from childhood to womanhood and was both a critical and commercial success. It spawned two sequels: Little Men and Jo’s Boys.

Over the years, there have been multiple screen and television versions and even a Broadway musical. Notable films have included the 1933 George Cukor version starring Katherine Hepburn as Jo; the 1949 one with June Allyson and Elizabeth Taylor; and the most popular, the 1994 version featuring Winona Ryder, Kirsten Dunst and Claire Danes. Best of all is the 2018 Masterpiece/BBC co-production that manages to find the balance between its original source and a contemporary audience.

Saoirse Ronan as Jo and Timothée Chalamet as Laurie in a scene from the film.

The newest incarnation is written and directed by Greta Gerwig, best-known for her breakout with 2017’s Lady Bird. There is a distinctly modern feel to the adaptation, and this is unmistakably intentional. The more progressive pieces in the story are emphasized, and it highlights the daughters’ independence. Certain departures from the original story shift some of the motivations and subsequent reactions, but, overall, the film is very true onto itself. It even manages to provide two endings that are able to live side-by-side so that Jo does not lose her individuality.  

Little Women is not necessarily long on plot. Instead, it is really a series of events that reveal character. At its heart, it is about a family dealing with the world. Even though it is set during the Civil War, this cataclysmic event stays on the periphery. It is the day-to-day world of the March family: financial challenges, separations, illness, marriage, career. It is the detail with which these struggles and triumphs are told that make the tapestry.

Undoubtedly, it requires a gifted cast, and this one does not disappoint. The quartet at the center all fair well. Emma Watson makes for a dimensional Meg, whose mild vanity does not overwhelm her good intentions. Eliza Scanlen as Beth is appropriately winsome without resorting to the usual caricatures of shyness and fragility. 

Timothée Chalamet and Florence Pugh play Laurie and Amy in ‘Little Women.’

At the center of any Little Women is Jo, a wonderfully complicated character, whose dream of being a writer drives much of the narrative. Saoirse Ronan is dynamic in her passions and vulnerable in her confusions. She holds center and keeps the story and the family together. But it is Florence Pugh as selfish Amy who finds a true arc and is the only one of the four to succeed in playing the character’s age range and subsequent growth; it is an unusual and artful performance.

Laura Dern’s Marmee is appropriately kind and matriarchal if the most modern of the players. Timothée Chalamet presents a more human Laurie, who, thwarted in his love for Jo, sinks into visible dissipation; it is a bold choice on Gerwig’s part, but it pays off in the resolution.  

Meryl Streep’s Aunt March lacks a true imperiousness; part of this is that the brittle and icy center has been softened with some odd choices that are so antithetical to Alcott’s vision, it makes her too knowing and less of an antagonist to both overcome and win over.  

Laura Dern, Meryl Streep and Florence Pugh in a scene from the film.

In smaller roles, Bob Odenkirk seems lost as the father while Tracy Letts, as Jo’s first editor, Mr. Dashwood, hits all of the right notes. Chris Cooper, as neighbor and later friend Mr. Laurence, never quite gets to underlying pain. James Norton’s John Brooke, Laurie’s tutor and eventually Meg’s husband, has been reduced to a cipher, which is a shame given his importance. 

The same could be said of Louis Garrel’s Professor Bhaer, Jo’s New York suitor: there just isn’t enough of him to make an impression. Jayne Houdyshell, as the family housekeeper, Hannah, manages to make the most of her scenes and avoids stereotype as best she can.

One element that has always been a challenge in adapting Little Women is the progression of the sisters from pre-/early teens to twenties. Most have not solved this problem, and this manifestation suffers worse than the previous versions. This is because of the film’s one major flaw: Gerwig chose to eschew a linear structure, instead shifting back-and-forth over about a 10-year period. With one very powerful exception, nothing is gained by this lack of chronology. Many of the shifts are clumsy, and the viewers must regroup to figure out where they were left in the previous time line. For those not well-versed with the story, it would probably make for a confusing and occasionally frustrating experience.

However, putting this aside, the final result is still worthwhile. There is an honest emotional core, and it is hard not to invest into this fresh new foray into the March family. While this might not be the definitive Little Women, it is certainly one for our time. Rated PG, Little Women is now playing in local theaters.

Kevin McEvoy's free art history lectures draw a crowd.

On the evening of Jan. 8, the Town of Smithtown held its first public hearing about the subdivision and development for the Flowerfield/Gyrodyne property on Route 25A in St. James. The plan, however, has already had a notable impact on the community.  

Prior to Wednesday night’s meeting, members of a vibrant local art community with studio space at Gyrodyne disbanded, leaving some artists searching for a new home.  

Kevin McEvoy, president and art director for The Atelier at Flowerfield, resigned Jan. 2. The studio’s operations director, youth program coordinator, two administrators and four teachers also resigned, he said, walking out along with more than 93 students. McEvoy is seeking new space in other towns. He was unable to respond to request for comments for legal reasons but did not deny that the subdivision and development situation was a factor. 

The Atelier trustee Barbara Beltrami, one of six trustees, said Monday’s classes were canceled, but the studio is still open for business. She expects operations to resume under a new director, when they find one.   

“Some classes are still functioning,” she said. “People should check with The Atelier for further information by calling 631-250-9009.” 

The Atelier website lacked information about the resignations. Its class schedule still lists McEvoy as instructor for 10 out of 21 classes in the winter schedule. Sources said that all but two teachers are gone.

Kevin McEvoy paints a portrait. The classically trained artist resigned Jan. 2 as president and art director of the Flowerfield Atelier.

 Paul Lamb serves as chairman for The Atelier at Flowerfield. He also has been Gyrodyne’s chairman of the board since 1999. Lamb, a lawyer with an office in Melville, was traveling and did not respond to messages left with requests for comment about the subdivision plans impact on the art community.  

Gary Fitlin, Gyrodyne’s CEO, president, CFO and treasurer, said in a phone interview the company is laying low until after the public hearings. He explained that the existing facilities will remain intact, when and if the project is ultimately approved by the town. Gyrodyne tenants, he said, will not be impacted by the subdivision development. The proposed 150-room hotel, two assisted living centers, two separate medical office parks and a new sewage treatment system, he said, will be located on the site’s undeveloped land.

“It is all very positive for our tenants,” he said. “The subdivision doesn’t impact them, its beneficial to our current tenants because it increases their opportunities.”

Sama Millwork, a fine quality handmade cabinet maker has been located at Gyrodyne for 28 years. John Sama said that he doesn’t expect any impact from the subdivision/development plans. 

“I’ve been hearing about this for a decade,” he said. “I’ll likely be retired by the time it happens.”

Vinny Galanti owns Picante Tex Mex, a Mexican deli and food truck kitchen that’s been located on the site for the last year. He said more development could be good for his operation. 

But for McEvoy and his following, doors have closed.

McEvoy and musicians perform in the atelier’s fine art library and cafe to celebrate its opening.

A native Long Islander, McEvoy was classically trained as an artist in the Charles Cecil studios in Florence, Italy. He opened the studio in the spring of 2016 with a vision to revive the classical drawing and painting techniques and traditions taught for centuries in Europe. In addition to offering instruction and hosting exhibitions of local, national and internationally renowned artists, he incorporated free art history lectures open to the community. The events typically drew large crowds. The studio recently renovated a portion of its space to create a library and café comprised of special collection of thousands of fine art books. McEvoy feverishly sketched in charcoal on the building’s cinder block walls the design he envisioned for the library space. Once the studio was gifted a collection of art books, construction was completed.

In previous interviews, McEvoy said that his hope for the library was to offer artists a space where they could share ideas and offer inspiration to each other. McEvoy also had architectural renderings created to convert the outdoor space surrounding the studio into a less industrial, more inviting garden space.

McEvoy paints with fellow artists while musicians perform at the Jazz Loft in Stony Brook.

It’s unclear how The Atelier’s unique original mission and vision will change with new leadership.  

The Atelier news comes at a time when the St. James community and its Celebrate St. James campaign is gearing up for revitalization by emphasizing the arts. Ironically, those plans hinge upon Gyrodyne’s development.  

Since the project would require the construction of a new wastewater treatment facility, town officials have been expecting to use the new plant to serve the Lake Avenue business district. 

“The town has had talks with the folks at Gyrodyne regarding their sewer treatment plant and the Lake Avenue business district, and they verbally indicated they would be willing to build their facility to accommodate Lake Avenue,” said Smithtown council member Tom Lohmann (R). “Additionally, the town received funding from Sen. [John] Flanagan [(R-East Northport)], $3.9 million, so we could install a sewer line when we start the Lake Avenue project, with the expectation we would be connecting to their plant.”

Representatives from Celebrate St. James, a group focused on the revival of the community’s art district, is also depending upon the Gyrodyne sewage treatment plant. 

“If we don’t connect, the town has to find a new location and get approvals from local, state agencies and health departments, which would take not months or years, it could take decades,” said its president, Natalie Weinstein.

Stock photo

By Matthew Kearns, DVM

I’ve always had trouble instituting New Year’s resolutions. Shortened daylight hours and colder weather make it sooooohhh difficult to get up early and exercise. I also instinctively look for starchy foods instead of fresh fruits and vegetables. Our pets face the same problems. 

Wild animals in colder climates slow down their metabolism and hibernate during winter months as temperatures drop and food becomes scarce. Domesticated dogs and cats are not so far removed from their wild ancestors that their own bodies react the same way. How do we avoid the inertia that inevitably sets in with winter weather?

The first thing is to keep an exercise routine in place. One of the few advantages of global warming is although temperatures drop, we don’t see as much snow and ice as in previous years. Sticking with daily walks helps keep their (and our) waistline at a manageable diameter. When the weather is not cooperating and our pets only go out long enough to do their business consider an indoor exercise routine. Rolling a ball to play fetch or using toys designed for cats to induce their stalking instincts are viable alternatives to playing outside. 

The second phase of our New Year’s resolutions is to take a closer look at calorie intake during colder months. I always recommend evaluating how many treats, rawhides, table scraps, etc. our pets receive. During the winter months we may need to decrease or eliminate these extras. 

I also see a lot of pets that gain weight the winter after they’ve been spayed or neutered and that can be difficult to take off again. Studies have shown that spaying and neutering dogs and cats does slow metabolism but, just because your pet was spayed or neutered does not mean that they will automatically become obese if we monitor their calorie intake and adjust properly. 

If we are exercising and reducing calories but not seeing a reduction in weight, it’s time to talk to our veterinarian about underlying disease. Glandular disorders such as underactive thyroid in dogs can lead to obesity and, without thyroid supplementation, no amount of diet and exercise will help them. Older dogs and cats frequently suffer from obesity secondary to arthritis. These pets exercise less because they are unable to move like when they were younger. 

Supplements and medications are available to help make them more comfortable and exercise more. Increased exercise and subsequent weight loss could reduce or eliminate medications (I recommend supplements lifelong).  

I hope this information is helpful in keeping our pets from gaining too much during the winter months. Now, onto my New Year’s resolution … UGH!!!

Dr. Kearns practices veterinary medicine from his Port Jefferson office and is pictured with his son Matthew and his dog Jasmine. Have a question for the vet? Email it to leisure@tbrnewspapers.com and see his answer in an upcoming column.

Artwork from local artists add beauty and warmth

By Heidi Sutton

John T. Mather Memorial Hospital in Port Jefferson recently completed an extensive renovation of its 2 South patient unit, designed to further reduce the risk of infection and increase patient comfort. The unit, which was named for New York Cancer & Blood Specialists thanks to its generous donation, officially reopened with a ribbon-cutting celebration on Jan. 6. The project was largely supported through community donations totaling close to $1.7 million.

Opened in 1973, 2 South, which primarily treats cancer patients, now features single-bed rooms for improved patient outcomes and privacy. Enhancements include new showers and enlarged bathrooms, a new nurses station, a patient family lounge and a serenity room for staff. 

One of the highlights of the newly renovated floor is the installation of 43 pieces of art that adorn the hallway walls. Titled “Wonders of Nature,” the pieces were chosen by curator Irene Ruddock. “My goal was to create a peaceful and serene environment that might provide a sense of spiritual healing. I looked for paintings that touched the soul and will provide comfort and solace for patients, staff, and visitors,” she explained. 

Twenty-nine local artists from LIMarts, the Setauket Artists and the North Shore Art Guild donated original works to add beauty and warmth to the unit including Ross Barbera, Shain Bard, Ron Becker, Joan Bloom, Kyle Blumenthal, Renee Caine, Anthony Davis, Bart DeCeglie, Julie Doczi, Lily Farah, Marge Governale, William Graf, Peter Hahn, Celeste Mauro, Judith Mausner, Lorraine McCormick, Ed McEvoy, Eleanor Meier, Rick Mundy, Karen Miller O’Keefe, Paula Pelletier, Joan Rockwell, Robert Roehrig, Joseph F. Rotella, Irene Ruddock, Ty Stroudsburg, Maria Lourdes Velez, Victoria Westholm and Patricia Yantz. 

“I will always to grateful to all the artists who, with their dedication to art, wished to share their gifts with Mather hospital,” said Ms. Ruddock.  

Evy McIntosh. Photo by Bryce Buell

By Melissa Arnold

A natural performer, Evy McIntosh is happiest when she’s on stage or in front of a camera.

The 16-year-old Ward Melville High School junior has already built an impressive resume in the entertainment world, appearing in several shows on the Investigation Discovery channel and Netflix, as well as in supporting roles in films. Beyond that, she’s been in a host of different theatrical plays both in and out of school.

For most teens, that’s where the story would end. But the Setauket resident has big dreams and a heart for others that she wants to share with the world.

Evy McIntosh. Photo by Bryce Buell

Beginning Jan. 17, Evy will join approximately 80 other girls from across the Empire State at Purchase College, where they will compete for the title of Miss New York Teen 2020. It’s the opportunity she always hoped for, but didn’t exactly expect.

“I was always singing when I was little, even if it wasn’t good. Then one day, I can remember watching TV and wondering, ‘How do they do that? How do they get there?’” she recalled. “I told my mom that was what I wanted to do.”

Mom Francine responded as most parents would: We’ll see.

“It was one of those things that just developed over time. Evy started acting when she was around 8 years old, and she became a part of the Performing Arts Studio in Port Jefferson, where she would do acting and voice lessons,” said her mother. “Eventually that led to acting work in Manhattan, and then this opportunity for Miss New York Teen USA fell into our world.”

With years of experience already under her belt and a blossoming professional career in the works, Evy said she was eager to try out modeling work. She thought that the pageant would be a great way to develop skills in that area while getting her name out to talent scouts, who are frequent attendees at pageants.

“I’ve really enjoyed getting to learn more about the pageant process, having my hair and makeup done, and picking out dresses. It’s a great way to meet people in the modeling industry,” she said, adding that she already attended an orientation for nearly 80 Miss New York Teen USA participants to learn the ins and outs of pageantry.

The process of narrowing the field to one outstanding teen actually takes three days. First, there’s a private, closed-door interview that allows the judges to get to know each girl in a relaxed, conversational environment. Girls wear professional outfits of their own choosing and talk about why they’re competing.

“You have to prove to the judges that you really deserve the crown. There is a time limit, and I know I’ll need to practice a lot with that because I can ramble sometimes,” Evy joked.

On the second day, all the girls are taught a dance routine and spend time rehearsing. It’s also when they’ll show off their activewear − the teen competition does not include swimsuits − and eveningwear. 

Then, on Jan. 19, approximately 15 semifinalists are revealed onstage during the crowning ceremony. One last walk in activewear and eveningwear will narrow the field to five finalists, who will answer interview questions. The winner will represent the state as Miss New York Teen USA for 2020 and receive a scholarship package.

Each girl has her own unique focus for the pageant that would become her platform if chosen as Miss New York Teen USA. For Evy, her mission is to create “One Community for All.”

“I have two older brothers, Francis and John Paul, who both have severe autism. I’ve also volunteered with the Dew Drop Inn in Patchogue, a place where kids with special needs can get together and have fun. I wanted to use my platform to stand up for everyone who feels different or insecure and give them a voice.”

Jackie Schiffer, founder of pageant consulting firm Commit to the Crown Coaching, has worked with hundreds of clients seeking to hone their pageant skills. Evy connected with Schiffer through an acting teacher in New York City.

“I’m so impressed by the presence that Evy has. Sometimes, teens can struggle with their confidence, but she has great poise, maturity and openness,” Schiffer said. 

With appearances in countless pageants, including top five finishes, Miss Congeniality awards and multiple titles, Schiffer has seen firsthand how participating in a pageant can benefit a young woman.

“Being in a pageant gives you the chance to get to know yourself and figure out how you want to present yourself to the world,” she said. “And goal setting is a big piece as well. It’s great if winning is one of the goals, but it’s also about individual, personal growth. It might be about becoming a better communicator, feeling more confident, developing body positivity or promoting a cause you really care about.”

Schiffer added that she’s excited to see how Evy will make an impact in the future.

“We need role models for young women. Women can sometimes be socialized to believe their voice matters less than others, and Evy wants to help give a voice to others. She’s a great role model for other girls.”

If you would like to support Evy, she is seeking business, professional and personal sponsors to help achieve her goal. Sponsors will be acknowledged in the Miss New York/Miss Teen New York USA 2020 program book. Visit www.gofundme.com/f/evy-mcintosh-miss-new-york-teen-usa-2020 or email fjpe3@yahoo.com for further information.

Stocking the fridge with healthy foods is a great way to start off the New Year. Stock photo

By David Dunaief, M.D.

Dr. David Dunaief

It is now the second week in January, and most of us have made a New Year’s resolution – or many of them. You’ve taken the first step, but how do you increase the “stickiness factor,” a term used by Malcolm Gladwell in his book, “The Tipping Point”?

Setting a goal that is simple and singular helps. We often overdo it by focusing on multiple resolutions, like eating better, exercising more and sleeping better. While these are all admirable, their complexity diminishes your chances of success. Instead, pick one to focus on, and make the desired impact part of your goal. For example, improve health by losing weight and reversing disease. 

Changing habits is always hard. There are some things that you can do to make it easier, though. 

Your environment is very important. According to Dr. David Katz, director, Yale-Griffin Prevention Research Center, it is not as much about willpower as it is about your environment. Willpower, Katz notes, is analogous to holding your breath underwater; it is only effective for a short timeframe. Thus, he suggests laying the groundwork by altering your environment to make it conducive to attaining your goals. Recognizing your obstacles and making plans to avoid or overcome them reduces stress and strain on your willpower. 

According to a study, people with the most self-control utilize the least amount of willpower, because they take a proactive role in minimizing temptation (1). Start by changing the environment in your kitchen.

Support is another critical element. It can come from within, but it is best when reinforced by family members, friends and co-workers. In my practice, I find that patients who are most successful with lifestyle changes are those where household members are encouraging or, even better, when they participate in at least some portion of the intervention, such as eating the same meals.

Automaticity: Forming new habits

When does a change become a new habit? The rule of thumb used to be it takes approximately three weeks. However, the results of a study at the University of London showed that the time to form a habit, such as exercising, ranged from 18 to 254 days (2). The good news is that, though there was a wide variance, the average time to reach this automaticity was 66 days, or about two months.

Lifestyle modification: Choosing a diet

U.S. News & World Report released its annual ranking of diets last week (3). Three of the diets highlighted include the DASH (Dietary Approach to Stop Hypertension) diet, the Ornish diet and the Mediterranean diet. These were the top three for heart health. The Mediterranean diet was ranked number one overall, and the DASH diet was ranked second. Both the Ornish and the DASH diets ranked in the top six. 

What do all of the top diets have in common? They focus on nutrient-dense foods. In fact, the lifestyle modifications I recommend are based on a combination of the top diets and the evidence-based medicine that supports them.

For instance, in a randomized crossover trial, which means patients, after a prescribed time, can switch to the more effective group, showed that the DASH diet is not just for patients with high blood pressure. The DASH diet was more efficacious than the control diet in terms of diabetes (decreased hemoglobin A1C 1.7 percent and 0.2 percent, respectively), weight loss (5 kg/11 lb vs. 2 kg/4.4 lb), as well as in HDL (“good”) cholesterol, LDL (“bad”) cholesterol and blood pressure (4). 

Interestingly, patients still lost weight, although caloric intake and the percentages of fats, protein and carbohydrates were the same between the DASH and control diets. However, the DASH diet used different sources of macronutrients. The DASH diet also contained food with higher amounts of fiber, calcium and potassium and lower sodium. 

Therefore, diets high in nutrient-dense foods may be an effective way to lose weight while treating and preventing disease. 

I will share one more tip: Take it day by day, rather than obsessing on the larger picture. Health and weight loss can – and should – go together.

References:

(1) J Pers Soc Psychol. 2012;102:22-31. (2) European Journal of Social Psychology, 40: 998–1009. (3) www.usnews.com. (4) Diabetes Care. 2011;34:55-57.

Dr. Dunaief is a speaker, author and local lifestyle medicine physician focusing on the integration of medicine, nutrition, fitness and stress management. For further information, visit www.medicalcompassmd.com.   

Donghui Zhu

By Daniel Dunaief

About 5 percent of people who suffer from Alzheimer’s disease have a genetic mutation that likely contributed to a condition that causes cognitive declines.

That means the vast majority of people with Alzheimer’s have other risk factors.

Donghui Zhu, an associate professor of biomedical engineering in the Institute for Engineering-Driven Medicine who joined Stony Brook University this summer, believes that age-related decline in the presence of the element magnesium in the brain may exacerbate or contribute to Alzheimer’s.

Donghui Zhu

The National Institutes of Health believes the former associate professor at the University of North Texas may be on the right track, awarding Zhu $3.5 million in funding. Zhu believes magnesium helps prevent the loss of neurons, in part because of the connection between this element, inflammation and the development of Alzheimer’s.

Numerous other factors may also contribute to the development of Alzheimer’s. Diabetes, lifestyle, a specific sleep cycle and low exercise levels may all play a role in leading to cognitive declines associated with Alzheimer’s, Zhu said.

According to some prior research, people with Alzheimer’s have a lower level of free magnesium in their body and in their serum levels than people who don’t suffer from this disease, he added.

In the short term, he aspires to try to link the magnesium deficiency to neuronal inflammation and Alzheimer’s disease.

Zhu plans to use some of the funds from the grant, which will run for the next five years, on animal models of Alzheimer’s. If his study shows that a lower level of magnesium contributes to inflammation and the condition, he would like to add magnesium back to their systems. Magnesium acts as an antioxidant and an anti-inflammatory agent.

“If we supply a sufficient amount of magnesium, can we slow down or reverse the process of this disease?” Zhu asked. “We hope it would.”

Any potential cognitive improvement in animal models might offer a promising alternative to current treatments, which often only have limited to moderate effects on patient symptoms.

In the longer term, Zhu would like to contribute to an understanding of why Alzheimer’s disease develops in the first place. Knowing that would lead to other alternative treatments as well.

“I don’t think my group or we alone can solve this puzzle,” he said. “We are all trying to chip in so the scientific community can have an answer or solution for the public.”

Like people with many other diseases or disorders, any two people with an Alzheimer’s diagnosis don’t necessarily have the same causes or type of the progressive disorder.

Women represent two-thirds of the Alzheimer’s population. Zhu said this isn’t linked to the longer life span for women, but may be more of a by-product of the change in female hormones over time.

In his research, he plans to study female and male animal models separately, as he looks to understand how the causes and progression of the disease may differ by gender.

In the human population, scientists have linked drug addiction or alcoholism with a higher risk of developing Alzheimer’s. He plans to perform additional studies of this connection as well.

“It’s the consensus in the community that alcohol addiction will increase the risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease,” Zhu said. People who consume considerable alcohol have reduced blood flow to the brain that can endanger or threaten the survival of blood vessels.

“This is another topic of interest to us,” he added.

Zhu is collaborating with other experts in drug addiction studies to explore the link with Alzheimer’s. 

In his research, he hopes to link his background in biology and engineering to tackle a range of translational problems. 

Stefan Judex, a professor and interim chair in the Department of Biomedical Engineering at Stony Brook, is excited about the potential for Zhu’s work.

Zhu is “a fast rising star in the field of biomaterials and fills a gap in our department and the university,” Judex explained in an email. “He is well-equipped to apply his unique research skills to a number of diseases, ultimately aiding in preventing and treating those conditions.”

In addition to his work on Alzheimer’s, Zhu also pursues studies in several other areas, including nano-biomaterials, biodegradable or bio-resorbable materials, regenerative medicine for cardiovascular and orthopedic applications, and drug delivery device and platforms

During his doctoral studies and training at the University of Missouri in Columbia, he focused on dementia and neuron science, while his postdoctoral research at the University of Rochester involved engineering, where he did considerable work on tissue engineering and biomaterials.

Zhu decided he had the right training and experience to do both, which is how he picked up on tissue engineering, regenerative medicine and neuroscience.

“They are not totally exclusive to each other,” he said. “There are many common theories or technologies, methods and models we can share.”

Adults don’t generate or create new neurons. He hopes in the future that an engineering approach may help to reconnect neurons that may have lost their interaction with their neighbors, in part through small magnesium wires that can “help guide their reconnection,” which is, he said, a typical example of how to use biomaterials to promote neuro-regeneration.

In his lab, he works on the intersection between engineering and medicine. The interdisciplinary and translational nature of the research attracted him to the new Institute for Engineering-Driven Medicine at Stony Brook.

He described Stony Brook as the “total package for me” because it has a medical school and hospital, as well as an engineering department and entrepreneurial support.

He has already filed numerous patents and would like to form start-up companies to apply his research.

Judex wrote that he is “incredibly pleased and proud that Dr. Zhu joined” Stony Brook and that it is “incredible that he received this large grant within the first few months since his start.”

In his career, Zhu would like to contribute to new treatments.

“Some day,” he said, he hopes to “put a real product on the market.”