By Nancy Burner, Esq.

Nancy Burner, Esq.

Concerns about accessing long-term care in the community is something we often discuss with our clients. How will they access the care? Who will pay for it? Is the care reliable? Can I safely and affordably age in place? 

The positive news is that there are many options for care in the community. We are fortunate to live in an area where care is accessible, reliable and affordable. Many of our clients are surprised to learn that Community Medicaid is a way to access care in the community. 

Unlike Chronic Medicaid, which requires a five-year financial look back as a prerequisite for eligibility, Community Medicaid does not have any look back. This means that with some relatively simple planning (in most cases) the financial eligibility requirements can be met with little to no waiting time.

It is important to note there are strict asset and income limitations for applicants for Community Medicaid. An applicant is permitted to have $15,150 in liquid nonretirement assets in his or her name (in New York for 2018). They can have an unlimited amount of qualified (retirement) accounts in their names so long as they are taking the required distribution as set out by the local Medicaid program. 

The primary residence is also an exempt resource, provided the Medicaid recipient remains in the home. It is advisable for all Medicaid recipients to do some estate planning with their home to ensure that it will remain protected should a need arise for care in a facility. Additionally, such planning can ensure that the home is protected from potential estate recovery after the death of the applicant. The applicant is also permitted to have an irrevocable prepaid prearranged funeral account.

With respect to income a single Medicaid applicant is permitted to retain $862 in monthly income. Any income amount over this allowance is considered “excess income.” The good news is that all of the Medicaid applicant’s excess income can be redirected into a pooled income trust, which is a type of special needs trust established and managed by nonprofit organizations for the benefit of disabled beneficiaries. The excess income transferred into a pooled trust can be used to pay the Medicaid applicant’s monthly household and personal expenses.

As you can see, with some relatively straightforward planning most people can qualify for Community Medicaid benefits. Once you have applied and been accepted under the Community Medicaid program, you can access a variety of services that will help you to remain in the community. 

For most of our clients the greatest benefit is the availability of a care provider who can come into their home and provide assistance with activities of daily living such as dressing, bathing, light housekeeping and meal preparation. 

Community Medicaid will also cover the cost of certain approved assisted living facilities and some adult day care programs. The availability and accessibility of care in the community is oftentimes far more available than most of our clients think. 

The community-based Medicaid program is invaluable for many seniors who wish to age at home but are unable to do so without some level of care and certain supplies the cost of which would be otherwise too expensive to sustain on their own. With some careful planning aging in place is certainly a viable option for most clients we meet.

Nancy Burner, Esq. practices elder law and estate planning from her East Setauket office.

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